Jump to content
BruceVC

Why do you enjoy RPG?

Recommended Posts

Salutations All

 

The thread heading question occurred to me during the heated debates in the various Romance\Sex threads in the PE forum. I am an advocate of Romance\Sex in games and many opponents of this concept use to say things like "an RPG is not about Romance" or " if you want Romance\Sex in an RPG play a dating sim". The hubris of these types of comments always use to annoy me as I would think " what gives someone else the right to define what an RPG is for me".

 

Also have you ever tried to discuss what an RPG is to someone who has never played or understood the concept. Its not that easy. My current g-friend asked me recently "so what type of PC games do you play ?". I started trying to explain what an RPG is " well you have this character or party that go's around on adventures and kills monsters and gains experience. Also you get to determine part of the story".

Even though it made sense to me I could tell by her blank look that she was really confused by the idea and more importantly "why I loved the genre so much".

 

Most gaming genre's are easy to explain, an FPS is basically about killing things and proving you can kill other players in a PVP arena. A RTS is about conquering the map and the strategy that it involves, its an intellectual game generally. Its easy to see the appeal in those types of games, but a persons love of an RPG I think is a bit more difficult to articulate.

 

We are all different ages and come from different backgrounds but we have one common hobby, RPG. Having just finished Alpha Protocol and Risen 2 I analyzed introspectively why I love the genre. For me its about

  • Exploration of the unknown: I love not knowing what lies over that hill or what is in that ruined temple.
  • Fantasy element: as an old fan of D&D and the Fighting Fantasy books this type of entertainment appeals to me. Fighting dragons and diabolical witches is just my thing.
  • The Narrative: I like the concept of being part of an epic saga and being able to influence the outcome, a bit like the classic story of Jason and the Argonauts.
  • The immersive nature of an RPG: I like the fact I can learn about my character and my party and interact with them. I identify with them and I enjoy ruminating on decisions they need to make and how they are going to effect them. I see myself as a modern day Conan the Barbarian " saving the world" and yes Romance\Sex is part of this interaction.

 

So take the time to think carefully about why you love this genre. What compels us to spend hundreds of hours playing these games. There are many other points I haven't mentioned like the whole magic and crafting component. I am interested in understanding your reasons :)

  • Like 1

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.” -  George Bernard Shaw

 

"What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead" - Nelson Mandela

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had this long diatribe written, but I think it's more prudent to wait until I'm in a less diminished state to comment. I will say that you've certainly become one of the staples of this forum, ya doofus, and I look forward to seeing whatever crazy assed topic you pull out next.


Fionavar's Holliday Wishes to all members of our online community:  Happy Holidays

 

Join the revelry at the Obsidian Plays channel:
Obsidian Plays


 
Remembering tarna, Phosphor, Metadigital, and Visceris.  Drink mead heartily in the halls of Valhalla, my friends!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You (BruceVC, thanks for ninjaing me :p) raise interesting points. I've OD'd on Fantasy at some point, which is why games like Alpha Protocol, Deus Ex: Human Revolution and the Mass Effect trilogy (barring the last 15 minutes) have appealed so much to me lately.

 

I think your final bullet point is really "the thing" for me, the more complete immersion, yes, including interaction of all kinds, is what put RPGs in a league of their own to me.

 

(Also, In b4 "deus ex is not an rpg!") :p

Edited by Nepenthe

You're a cheery wee bugger, Nep. Have I ever said that?

ahyes.gifReapercussionsahyes.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it was the first bullet point. I love exploration. In real life and in video games. The "real" me has already expended all 9 cat lives and is in the red :grin:

 

It started out with the old rogue likes on X11/Unix machines and went downhill from there. First exploring dungeons and later exploring games that had larger maps. Not just limited to rpgs. I'm a great fan of the original Tomb Raider games and cringe at the thought of what they have turned into. I loved the IE games and Fallout when they appeared for the sheer scope of exploration of new people and experiences they offered. Just as fun as reading books (and I used to be a regular squatter at libraries in my younger days, exploring other peoples exploration through their writing).

 

I could continue to add to it, but it really sums it up. I love games that gives me a feeling of exploration and discovery :)

 


“He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would surely suffice.” - Albert Einstein

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*thinks a long time....*

 

To be honest, I don't think it's so much that I love RPG's as much as I love certain aspects of gameplay. These attractions can be found in more than one genre, altho they will often be found more regularly or more "deeply" in one genre over another.

 

--Exploration that has a "there might be something useful/cool over there, so I must go look!" compulsion (FPS rarely has enough of this for me, but strategy/adventure games might have it)

--obsessive task-orientation: alchemy, crafting, design, loot, flexibility and growth (learning efficiency or multiple ways to "win")

 

If I'm lucky, there will also be:

--non-PC characters that I can grow to love, or just amuse me (I rarely care about my own player-character itself, except in terms of how choices made affect other characters)

 

It's obviously more emotionally immersive to become concerned/attached to a fully formed RPG NPC with a nice background/story and its own personality, but I've been known to become very attached to RTS units, aRPG "pets" and drone companions (Majesty's monks, Stronghold's warriors and archers, Dungeon Keeper's imps and vampires, Torchlight's pets, etc)...in those cases, it's usually because of amusement, but it's an attachment nonetheless, that keeps me playing and tends to have me using those units almost to exclusion. :biggrin:

 

RPG's just have the potential to have these things with a higher level intensity.


“Things are as they are. Looking out into the universe at night, we make no comparisons between right and wrong stars, nor between well and badly arranged constellations.” – Alan Watts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had this long diatribe written, but I think it's more prudent to wait until I'm in a less diminished state to comment. I will say that you've certainly become one of the staples of this forum, ya doofus, and I look forward to seeing whatever crazy assed topic you pull out next.

 

I look forward to it, I know you are very skilled at comprehensive and detailed posts when you want to discuss something pertinent :)

 

@ Gorth and Nep

 

Yes our reasons will probably be similar. It also can raise some interesting psychological factors about about our personalities, for example some people will say "you like RPG because you want to escape from reality"

 

Now that may be the reason some do it but I am very happy with my real life. Also there is nothing wrong with escapism if its therapeutic?


"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.” -  George Bernard Shaw

 

"What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead" - Nelson Mandela

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked the genre because I enjoyed the stories. Nowadays the story doesn't seem to suck me in as much - I'm not sure if that's because I've gotten older or because they're not as well written.

  • Like 1

There are none that are right, only strong of opinion. There are none that are wrong, only ignorant of facts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

--obsessive task-orientation: alchemy, crafting, design, loot, flexibility and growth (learning efficiency or multiple ways to "win")

 

 

 

Interesting points raised, so for me the whole plethora of crafting components isn't really a big deal. But for some its huge. They take there non-combat skills very seriously. I remember in Ultima Online there was this guy that just use to logon and go and chop wood everyday, thats all he did. Everyday in the game. I never understood it but he enjoyed it. He would then sell the wood in the market.


"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.” -  George Bernard Shaw

 

"What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead" - Nelson Mandela

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Generally I favor RPGs because of the way the stories are presented. A lot of games now are starting to put more focus on story, especially a lot of action titles, but the way they are presented vs the way RPGs present it is different. Generally RPGs tend to have more interactivity in the story, and thats what draws me in.


The area between the balls and the butt is a hotbed of terrorist activity.

Devastatorsig.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's the latter Moose. I'm not a big fan of RPGs in any general way. RTS is more to my taste. However I was a huge fan of the Infinity games (BG 1 & 2, IWD, PS:T). Very few RPGs have drawn me in since and the reason really is the story and the interaction with the other characters.

 

I never really bought in to NWN 1 or 2, or even Oblivion or Morrowind for that matter because for the most part the story lines for the game were just not that well done and for the most part you are going through it alone. In NWN your henchmen were not interactive so they were little more than healers/cannon fodder. NWN2 was a little better with this but only two or three of them was interesting or compelling. The rest were sort of vanilla. Oblivion & Morrowind were beautiful to look at but sort of empty too. I have not tried Skyrim yet. It was the same with Fallout 3 & New Vegas.

 

What I loved about BG & BG2 and PS:T was the other party members really felt like real characters. They spoke, interacted, commented on how things were going. It draws you in, gives the illusion they are more than just sprites on your screen. I'm playing through Dragon Age Origins for the first time right now and I'm really into it for that very reason. So I guess my answer is good writing, and good characters. Where you can find them. It's the exception rather than the rule I'm afraid.


“I was not born to be forced. I will breathe after my own fashion. Let us see who is the strongest.” 
― Henry David Thoreau

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember in Ultima Online there was this guy that just use to logon and go and chop wood everyday, thats all he did. Everyday in the game. I never understood it but he enjoyed it. He would then sell the wood in the market.

Been there, have the t-shirt. ;)

It's not that I auto-like all crafting (Skyrim's did not interest me much) but sometimes the design of the crafting options hits the right mental trigger. Other times it's not actually the crafting itself, either, but more the process of hunting/finding the things you need to craft. In a way, a compliment to exploration perhaps.


“Things are as they are. Looking out into the universe at night, we make no comparisons between right and wrong stars, nor between well and badly arranged constellations.” – Alan Watts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like games to have a story. Adventure games are the obvious choice, RPGs a close second. While RPGs may be lighter on the story part, they allow (some more some far less) the player to be more actively involved in this story -> more engaging story.

 

Or at least that's what I like to pretend the real reason to be for me to play this genre.

The ruth is far mroe sinister and tragic: People got the whole Mayan "end of the world" prediction wrong. Somewhere in translation the fine print got lost: the whole prediction will only come true if and only if melkathi stops playing RPG games. That is why a secret order of world preservation mayans (scions of the mayan oracles who made the prediction and their students) has locked m away in a secret dungeon, forced to play rpgs non-stop.

  • Like 2

Unobtrusively informing you about my new ebook (which you should feel free to read and shower with praise).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

--Exploration that has a "there might be something useful/cool over there, so I must go look!" compulsion (FPS rarely has enough of this for me, but strategy/adventure games might have it)

--obsessive task-orientation: alchemy, crafting, design, loot, flexibility and growth (learning efficiency or multiple ways to "win")

 

If I'm lucky, there will also be:

--non-PC characters that I can grow to love, or just amuse me (I rarely care about my own player-character itself, except in terms of how choices made affect other characters)

See, those are the two things about the classic RPG way of doing things that absolutely bore me to tears.

 

I'd hazard a guess that the classic RPG formula is so successful because it offers something to so many different people. Tactical combat, the above, a deeper, more personal experience... Which also explains that some people feel a lot more disenfranchised than others with the way RPGs tend to get built these days.


You're a cheery wee bugger, Nep. Have I ever said that?

ahyes.gifReapercussionsahyes.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like games to have a story. Adventure games are the obvious choice, RPGs a close second. While RPGs may be lighter on the story part, they allow (some more some far less) the player to be more actively involved in this story -> more engaging story.

 

Or at least that's what I like to pretend the real reason to be for me to play this genre.

The ruth is far mroe sinister and tragic: People got the whole Mayan "end of the world" prediction wrong. Somewhere in translation the fine print got lost: the whole prediction will only come true if and only if melkathi stops playing RPG games. That is why a secret order of world preservation mayans (scions of the mayan oracles who made the prediction and their students) has locked m away in a secret dungeon, forced to play rpgs non-stop.

 

:grin: funny melk


"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.” -  George Bernard Shaw

 

"What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead" - Nelson Mandela

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only enjoy RPGs that allow me to be a psychopathic narcissist. I mean, why play an RPG if you can't play as yourself?

 

True :)


"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.” -  George Bernard Shaw

 

"What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead" - Nelson Mandela

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

:grin: funny melk

 

Here I am (though not knowing where here is, as this dungeon continuously shifts location through the space time continuum) chained to a PC in this aforementioned dungeon, playing RPGs just so the world continues to exist and so you can keep on laughing at my plight...


Unobtrusively informing you about my new ebook (which you should feel free to read and shower with praise).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it is all about escapism. I can go into a beautiful (often magical) world, and become someone of note. I can leave a legacy. And I can do it my way.

I get the ego flattery and validation that I so sorely lack in RL :p


Remember: Argue the point, not the person. Remain polite and constructive. Friendly forums have friendly debate. There's no shame in being wrong. If you don't have something to add, don't post for the sake of it. And don't be afraid to post thoughts you are uncertain about, that's what discussion is for.
---
Pet threads, everyone has them. I love imagining Gods, Monsters, Factions and Weapons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The setting/story being interesting to me is one source of enjoyment with RPGs, probably due to my starting off with adventure games mainly, heh. Just progressing and developing the PC skill-wise is also enjoyable as I enjoy tinkering with systems (probably why my first run throughs of KOTOR and Fallout ended up with garbage characters, heh.


Why has elegance found so little following? Elegance has the disadvantage that hard work is needed to achieve it and a good education to appreciate it. - Edsger Wybe Dijkstra

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i am essentially an immersion junkie, and i find that RPGs (well done ones, in any case) tend to lend themselves superbly to immersion. i also enjoy the management aspects in a lot of games, particularly RPG and strategy games, and there's a pretty big escapism element in there, basically inherent to the immersion angle. a well-crafted RPG is essentially an interactive story, so i'd say i like them for the same reasons i like fiction novels and movies, combined with the interactivity element. and if they're intellectually stimulating as well, all the better (planescape: torment cemented in me the interest in philosophy that i built by plaing sid meier's alpha centauri, for example).

  • Like 1

WWTNOD?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One has found that chopping people up with axes in reality leads to a certain amount of disgruntlement, thus the need for escapist virtual homicide.

 

Joking aside, for oneself it's probably a certain desire for escapism, necessitated by disillusion or perhaps boredom with the modern world. Life sometimes seems a little too easy and regimented, then again "may you live in interesting times" and all that.

  • Like 1

Quite an experience to live in misery isn't it? That's what it is to be married with children.

I've seen things you people can't even imagine. Pearly Kings glittering on the Elephant and Castle, Morris Men dancing 'til the last light of midsummer. I watched Druid fires burning in the ruins of Stonehenge, and Yorkshiremen gurning for prizes. All these things will be lost in time, like alopecia on a skinhead. Time for tiffin.

 

Tea for the teapot!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it is all about escapism. I can go into a beautiful (often magical) world, and become someone of note. I can leave a legacy. And I can do it my way.

I get the ego flattery and validation that I so sorely lack in RL :p

 

For me it's the exact other way around. I hate getting validation through games. I think our world is so full of need to get validation in any ways, so I'm glad if I'm a nameless knight without any significance - as shown in Mount & Blade or Dragon's Dogma for instance. Not that I deem those who like validation through games stupid - not at all. Validation is validation no matter how you get it. It's all about the feeling. So if it's through Facebook likes, through being a hero in a game to achieving something in school - it doesn't matter because feelings are relative.

 

I'd rather be an underdog that has to fight his way through.

 

I also love RPGs because of the exploration aspect (Skyrim has no real exploration in my opinion, because there is nothing of worth to be discovered - I'd rather have uncharted lands with ancient ruins and stuff like that). And of course the narrative, not necessarily the story but some sort of narrative. I care more for individual side-stories than for a grand vision.

 

Well, in total I think my love for RPGs cannot be underlined by certain aspects, it's more the whole experience. I just want to go on an adventure.

  • Like 1

Elan_song.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...