Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Odoakar

Kinda dissapointed with PoE 2 :(

Recommended Posts

I'm trying to force myself to like the game, but there are issues that just won't go away. I really hope Obsidian can patch some of this, but some feel unfixable:(

 

Some of them:

 

1. Load times are still considerable and the game size is too big for SSD. Running through Nehetaka is a string of load time where I find myself starring into the black abyss of my monitor, thinking about how I'm sitting in front of my monitor and looking into blackness of it.

 

2. Companion romances are in need of dire fix. Cca 1 day and 4 hours of world time, having basically not spoken to Maya, she proclaims that she wants to pursue romantic relationship with me. I felt nothing, because there was no setup, no prior interaction. It's just poorly done.

 

3. Open world is a detriment to the tightness of the story. In PoE game flowed neatly, but never felt too narrow, as you had a lot of sidequest around your main quest. So you could do some sidequest, clean up your journal, progress a bit further with the story and then open new sidequests and so on. It felt natural. Here you are thrown into this huge open world, with a huge main city right at the start, and you basically forget what you are supposed to do. Chasing a statue? Why do I care about that? Yes, it has my soul, but no one mentioned that for the past 20 hours and there doesn't seem to be any urgency around that. You are thrown into political confrontations of three factions and that starts to feel like the main game, instead of progressing through the story. Here is 50+ quests you can do, and not one of them ties that much into the main story quest.

 

4. The quest seems bland. NPC's seem bland. After a while, I got lost in all the names I was finding in my journal and started just running quest without even realizing and caring why I'm doing them at all. It was all do some random thing for some random guy who is in trouble due to this other random guy.

 

5. I like going through textual interactions with only my keyboard, amico. You can imagine how infastido I got when every third frase has a world that breaks my immersion in the game mond, and forces me to move my topo to see what the word means, and then trying to put it in forma with the meaning of the sentence. Aic, amico. And then you kind dimentico what you just read 6 seconds fa.

 

6. Ship to ship combat is: 1. Get in desired range. 2. Turn left. 3. Hold. 4. Fire. 5. Jibe. 6. Hold. 7. Fire. 8. Jibe. 9. Hold, 10. Fire, Jibe.....really not feeling this part of the game. And it's a considerable part of the game.

 

Combat is good though. GFX looks sweet, especially spells. DW pistols fees awesome. Multiclassing is great.

 

But in the end, I'm kinda wishing there was a mod of PoE that adds multiclassing, DW pistols and improves the GFX a bit.

 

I'm kinda sad right now.

Edited by Odoakar
  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm trying to force myself to like the game, but there are issues that just won't go away. I really hope Obsidian can patch some of this, but some feel unfixable:(

 

Some of them:

 

1. Load times are still considerable and the game size is too big for SSD. Running through Nehetaka is a string of load time where I find myself starring into the black abyss of my monitor, thinking about how I'm sitting in front of my monitor and looking into blackness of it.

 

2. Companion romances are in need of dire fix. Cca 1 day and 4 hours of world time, having basically not spoken to Maya, she proclaims that she wants to pursue romantic relationship with me. I felt nothing, because there was no setup, no prior interaction. It's just poorly done.

 

Yes to load times. Perhaps give us something like a ton of stats to look at while it loads. If you can't fix the time, give us something to chew on as we wait.

 

As for the quick flirt. I have a family now of over 20 years and I met my wife out of the blue and it became romantic from the start, tons of people have similar stories. They don't all and in fact most don't fester like Sam and Diane (Cheers), love/lust at first sight is a real thing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for the companions dialogues , they are bugged . The coming patch should fix them . 


I'll bet ye've got all sorts o' barmy questions! (She mimics your heroic stance) Greetin's, I have some questions... can ye tell me about this place? Who's the Lady o' Pain? I'm lookin' fer the magic Girdle of Swank Iron, have ye seen it? Do ye know where a portal ta the 2,817th Plane o' the Abyss might be? Do ye know where the Holy Flamin' Frost-Brand Gronk-Slayin' Vorpal Hammer o' Woundin' an' Returnin' an' Shootin'-Lightnin'-Out-Yer-Bum is?

 

Elderly Hive Dweller

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fair feedback about loading times. Or Maia hunger.

 

Ship combat: "full speed ahead and deck combat"

There could be an item, ship improvment like "giant adra ram" which would allow to start deck combat with less hull dmg.

Or Barrels with Pig Products to drop behind when we run away.

 

But Open World sidequesting: at least there are no watchertowers. But i like it. It is part of genre of crpg that main quest is, but we are here for doing all fetch quests and rat killing, and intercourse with allien races.

It is desired to finish game, and reach max level without doing every quest. Just this which suit your watcher.

 

Ekera, i just adapt to vallian words, and assume the meaning.

Edited by evilcat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think the problem with the main quest is the open world at all. It's just not a very exciting main quest. Also the Valian words mostly work as embellishments to dialogue like you don't actually need to know what they mean. It's also pretty obvious what most of the words mean as the Vailian language is mostly just itallian with a few changes here and there.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Granted, a lot of how one perceives each quest and the likes is up to one's personal experience and reaction, but seriously I'm at a loss as to how you can look at a game like this and say the quests are "bland". To me they're anything but, if anything they've shown some of the finest quests I've run across with a staggering amount of choice and consequence, of potential resolutions and all manners of interesting details, twists and discoveries to be made throughout, which all feed their own new facet into the world of Eora. Early on we're already presented with a quest to seek vengeance against the pirate that assaulted our ship earlier, *if* we wish to do so, and upon looking for a way into the fort you are already given three introductory options from the get-go, each with their own specific challenge and catering to pretty different means of playing the game; within the fortress you can always opt to plow your way through, to sneak your way to the command room, or to attempt to lure out the character in several possible ways. The resolution I went for, ultimately, was immediately satisfying and one I've never come across in any of the games inspiring this same. It was a very fitting resolution for the overall quest and for that character particularly, and I was immensely pleased - I immediately saw Fort Deadlight as something of a further refinement on Raedric's Hold in the first game.

 

 

There's several quests whose role within the overall conflict is pretty complex, clever and really rather fascinating - as another example, it being one of the most recent questlines I've completed, there's the conflict between the Wahaki of Ori o Koiki and the slavers from Crookspur. You can choose to ally with either one and there are third parties interested on either side of the deal: on one hand the Vailian Trading Company sees profit from the slaving business as do the Principi, and the latter in particular seem to be doing so at the hand of the former, likewise working their way to a more legitimate business arrangement between both parties and so on (I didn't follow this path in particular so I don't know the exact interests and consequences here); the Kahanga tribe on the other hand seek to build a stronger liaison with the Wahaki for when the time comes to fight the foreign invaders, but so does the Royal Deadfire Company, arguably their strongest enemy, at least in military terms. I followed the latter, I helped the Wahaki because it seemed like the right thing to do and cleared out the fort of slavers - my assumption was that the Royal Deadfire Company seeked to destabilize the Vailian Trading Company through the move thanks to their intel on Castol's involvement with the trade. But then something else happened which to my mind was pretty unexpected and a twist that showed just how the Rauataians acquired a major advantage not only on the Vailians but the Huana as well - they occupied the fort. The *exact* fort that interrupts the direct route between Ori o Koiki and Neketaka, thus proving an immense positional advantage over these same. Previously we had acted against the Royal Deadfire Company's wishes by purifying the adra pillar at Poko Kohara, and likewise I was very surprised by Atsura's observation regarding the storms and their relationship with those in Rauatai. As a character he's really interesting and likable to me precisely because of this aspect of him, but I digress.

 

 

Now, really, moments like these may mean quite a bit to me and not much at all to another, but I think it's safe to say that the quest design in this game is generally of a level far beyond what we've seen in the first game. In comparison, the first game's quests by and large seemed pretty linear and bite-sized to me, they were interesting because I think they often added something to the world and themes at hand, but I wouldn't say any particularly stuck in my mind as a particularly exceptional questline. Here I've seen several so far to me really live up to the meaty approach of a game like Baldur's Gate II, and I love that about it. I just can't agree at *all* with that statement.

 

With regards to the character names I'm really loving the thought put behind the sound of each character name, each according to the various regions present in this world. I love the sound of the Vailian language and I think it's used with enough context to perfectly understand what is being said without need of the aiding hover. In this regard it is to me well ahead of practically all other fantasy games I can think of, but I can understand how, if you don't dig the sound or whatnot, this might just prove irksome instead.

  • Like 7

My Twitch channel: https://www.twitch.tv/alephg

Currently playing: Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The game fits nicely on my SSD. Loading times are very short for me.

 

The whole relationship system is bugged atm - hence the fast approaches.

 

I kind of agree to the rest more or less.


Deadfire Community Patch: Nexus Mods

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ekera, the open world feels a bit like an Elder Scrolls game. Just so much to do and explore all over the place. I actually had a small moment of "OMG. This is like a giant to-do list. Why is it that I play video games again?" ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the ship comabt and load times. I have to sit and stare for 30-45 seconds for every load screen.

That’s just crazy
  • Like 1

"Art and song are creations but so are weapons and lies"

"Our worst enemies are inventions of the mind. Pleasure. Fear. When we see them for what they are, we become unstoppable."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ekera, the open world feels a bit like an Elder Scrolls game. Just so much to do and explore all over the place. I actually had a small moment of "OMG. This is like a giant to-do list. Why is it that I play video games again?" ;)

 

I'm not sure what makes you say this, but I have so far not gotten this vibe at all myself - each quest I've gotten has had some aspect to it that's made it unique from the rest, save the bounties (though even so, Dessiral's bounties do come with a nice little addition of their own as well). An aspect I've been loving about the game is that contrary to most other open world games I've played, it seems fully committed into making its side content as meaty and narratively enticing as it can possibly be, and definitely that's how I've been finding all of the side content so far. The sheer amount of choice and consequence in the game is really impressive, which is not at all an aspect I'd highlight from the Elder Scrolls games I've played. This feels like a proper RPG and not merely a sandbox with RPG elements.

 

That said, if you're referring to how you can build a seemingly daunting list of quests to complete, I can agree. But I don't see that as a negative necessarily, I kind of appreciate that feeling actually. But that's me, perhaps. I like to be overwhelmed in that fashion.

 

To go back to the OP, I forgot to mention about this point that I don't disagree that the game does a fairly poor job at lending a sense of urgency to the soul-chasing. Then again it seems to me that this is a pretty typical issue amidst most open or semi-open world games, or at least the kind that have extensive side-questing: you want to keep the central conflict relevant somewhat and that is often through some sense of pressure or urgency; yet all too often is the openness of the game at odds with the same. For every sidequest you do in Baldur's Gate II you delay Imoen's rescue and place her in prolongued danger at the hands of the Cowled Wizards or Jon Irenicus for that matter; for every bounty you accept as Geralt in The Witcher III you delay your search for Ciri and risk the Wild Hunt getting to her first; for every side diversion in Skyrim, Dragon Age: Origins and Neverwinter Nights 2 you allow the baddie, be it a dragon or shadow or army or whatever, to continue wreaking havoc and threatening the lands and so on. Heck, for every quest you take in the first Pillars you risk insanity and the likes too. I'm not saying Deadfire is excused from this fault by other games committing it as well, but I wonder if Deadfire is particularly worse at this than the rest. I still reckon that one of the best games managing this issue by adding a tangible consequence to avoiding/ignoring the central conflict is Mask of the Betrayer, but then that game never strays particularly far from its central narrative (or so I recall it anyhow). Whether or not, by now I feel I've grown fairly accustomed to this "dissonance" as much as I can accept a wandering party carrying sixteen sets of full-plate armour in their backpack, but it's a legitimate issue if it proves distancing for others.

  • Like 1

My Twitch channel: https://www.twitch.tv/alephg

Currently playing: Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it's just a matter of the setting of Deadfire Archipelago being too well-known and not at all mysterious after a dozen of hours. When in Dyrwood, even if the quests were constructed in a more typical manner, I couldn't predict what would happen to me. In Deadfire I could see too many things coming, like when there was this quest with a guy who left something in Luminous Bathhouse, I had just from the journal context known that he is up to no good. There is a story in every Deadfire quest, but I can see the ending right away in too many instances (of course there are some great exceptions like Palleginas quest or the whole animancy project, but the wateshaper school quest is spoiled by the obvious clue from the staue ages before anything happens there and even what occurs in the end couldn't make it up to me).
The pirate setting has a far more generic feeling to it than the mysterious and dark Dyrwood which is ravaged by wars, lifeless children and ancient mysteries. The corrupted adra and all the engwithan stuff in the Deadfire isn't fleshed out. The main quest feels like another game to me, with it taking place mostly in designated areas rather than in the world organically. Why not leave more, even minor ties to the main plot in the whole big, open game world of Deadfire? In Pillars One there where ties to the hollowborn everywhere, you could feel it, while here you get the dissonance between 5 (or something like that) quests regarding the big walking adra giant statue wanting to change the world as we know it and the yarr-harr  :skull: piratey fun with mateys and savages and trading companies eluding you. 

Also there is no real dungeon in this game, like Caed Nua was in the first Pillars. The combat is great but the auto ai + unbalanced highest difficulties spoil the experience and take away the fun of experimenting with the multiclassing and different party compositions. When I try replaying the game I get tired of it too easily because of the scripted events that I know too well, but I suppose it's my fault because I already spent 100+ hours in the game :p
All in all I can't complain much, it's worth the money but sadly lacks the PoE 1 magic :( Bugfixes and additional content, mainly dungeons and memorable, big questlines could do this game a great service - PoE 1 also wasn't perfect at the release. Patches and DLCs I believe in your power!  :bow:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man, I just keep finding myself on the complete opposite end in this thread, it seems. I personally have not yet finished the game due to some unforeseen issues (i.e. my Windows ceasing to work), but precisely what I'm loving about the game at the stage I'm in is that I'm not sure what is going on, and while I have my assumptions and concerns I do not confidently stand by them either. The game's had me second-guessing myself very frequently, and plenty of questlines have led into very surprising outcomes for me. I came in with certain expectations about the story thus far and have been enjoying the means by which the depiction of each faction for example has to a greater or lesser extent diverted from where I assumed they would veer to.

 

 

And yes, there are some quests that play a certain story pretty straight like the task involving that kid at the Luminous Bathhouse, yet on the other hand we do have the likes of Aloth's companion quest, or Poko Kohara's (a damn fine dungeon too, I will add), or the consequences to the slaver's quest that I mentioned above and so on.

 

 

Also I do not see how all that one can take out of this setting is that it's a "pirate setting". Far as I'm concerned that's a fairly secondary element to the setting that sets the tone to a couple of quests but hardly to the setting as a whole. To say it's a "pirate setting" is to ignore the many other elements that are present and are arguably as important or more in defining the region's feel, such as the many colonial themes what with the cultural clash, the Dorado hysteria present in the search for Ukaizo, the pioneering drive and progressivism classic of the Renaissance era, all mixed too with the touch of metempsychosis and metaphysics that lend the settinga particularly otherworldly vibe... To say this is a pirate setting is about as reductionist as claiming the Dyrwood is just a medieval Europe fantasy land.

 

 

Likewise I do not believe Eothas' story is separate from the rest of the events and quests in the game. The end goal is pretty clearly Ukaizo, yet we have at least four different quests which each clue us into what Ukaizo is and what its relevance is to the story at hand. Similarly, the role of luminous adra as well as the "science" and beliefs of the soul, the states of existence and reincarnation are pretty heavily explored through various interactions and sidequests, and amidst all of this the conflict between the factions isn't incidental, nor does it not inform several other quests not related to the faction questlines specifically.

 

Edited by algroth
  • Like 2

My Twitch channel: https://www.twitch.tv/alephg

Currently playing: Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you guys realize that you can hover your mouse over the Valian words (among other things) during the dialogs and it'll pop up a little window describing the meaning of the word in question?   Very nice little feature that I didn't realize was there for quite a while until I noticed that certain words in the dialog text were of a slightly different color.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Also I do not see how all that one can take out of this setting is that it's a "pirate setting". Far as I'm concerned that's a fairly secondary element to the setting that sets the tone to a couple of quests but hardly to the setting as a whole. To say it's a "pirate setting" is to ignore the many other elements that are present and are arguably as important or more in defining the region's feel, such as the many colonial themes what with the cultural clash, the Dorado hysteria present in the search for Ukaizo, the pioneering drive and progressivism classic of the Renaissance era, all mixed too with the touch of metempsychosis and metaphysics that lend the setting a particularly otherworldly vibe... To say this is a pirate setting is about as reductionist as claiming the Dyrwood is just a medieval Europe fantasy land.

 

 

 

The piracy theme is just one party of the greater whole.  The setting sort of feels like the Caribbean meets the political intrigue of Renaissance Europe. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Also I do not see how all that one can take out of this setting is that it's a "pirate setting". Far as I'm concerned that's a fairly secondary element to the setting that sets the tone to a couple of quests but hardly to the setting as a whole. To say it's a "pirate setting" is to ignore the many other elements that are present and are arguably as important or more in defining the region's feel, such as the many colonial themes what with the cultural clash, the Dorado hysteria present in the search for Ukaizo, the pioneering drive and progressivism classic of the Renaissance era, all mixed too with the touch of metempsychosis and metaphysics that lend the setting a particularly otherworldly vibe... To say this is a pirate setting is about as reductionist as claiming the Dyrwood is just a medieval Europe fantasy land.

 

 

 

The piracy theme is just one party of the greater whole.  The setting sort of feels like the Caribbean meets the political intrigue of Renaissance Europe. 

 

I love the setting very much, it's immersive and exciting and tons of fun...but it's not terribly original, it's just the Maluka Archipelago circa the 16th century translated into a fantasy setting. That's all it is. I don't mean that in a derogatory fashion; these aren't themes that are commonly explored in video games and it's a setting that isn't commonly seen in a video game, both of which are really cool. I just mean that it isn't some masterpiece of uniqueness and originality.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Also I do not see how all that one can take out of this setting is that it's a "pirate setting". Far as I'm concerned that's a fairly secondary element to the setting that sets the tone to a couple of quests but hardly to the setting as a whole. To say it's a "pirate setting" is to ignore the many other elements that are present and are arguably as important or more in defining the region's feel, such as the many colonial themes what with the cultural clash, the Dorado hysteria present in the search for Ukaizo, the pioneering drive and progressivism classic of the Renaissance era, all mixed too with the touch of metempsychosis and metaphysics that lend the setting a particularly otherworldly vibe... To say this is a pirate setting is about as reductionist as claiming the Dyrwood is just a medieval Europe fantasy land.

 

 

 

The piracy theme is just one party of the greater whole.  The setting sort of feels like the Caribbean meets the political intrigue of Renaissance Europe. 

 

I love the setting very much, it's immersive and exciting and tons of fun...but it's not terribly original, it's just the Maluka Archipelago circa the 16th century translated into a fantasy setting. That's all it is. I don't mean that in a derogatory fashion; these aren't themes that are commonly explored in video games and it's a setting that isn't commonly seen in a video game, both of which are really cool. I just mean that it isn't some masterpiece of uniqueness and originality.

 

 

Originality in a traditional fantasy setting is going to be more or less impossible at this point.  Tolkien is the grandpappy of fantasy settings and you could say that between Greyhawk, Forgotten Realms, and Golarion we've seen all you can possibly see.  Taking disparate real-world cultures and civilizations from various points of history and transplanting them into the setting as discrete nations or realms is standard and expected.  Edo era or Meiji era Japan, various Chinese dynasties (typically Han, Qing, or Song), ancient Rome, ancient Greece, ancient Egypt, medieval Muslim regions (middle east, north africa, and west africa generally), medieval India and sometimes British Raj India, and of course Europe.  Renaissance is less common but can be found in settings that allow early firearms, Da Vinci's sketches made real, etc.  Eora is no different here; at best, we can compare it to Eberron, where the setting uses established tropes and cliches but manages to do a few things creatively with them (for Eora it's the concept of the soul, the wheel, animancy, etc.)

 

Planescape and Numenera are some of the only settings I can think of that I'd genuinely say are pretty original.  Monte Cook usually has THAT going for him, if nothing else.

 

More on topic, I think the setting of Deadfire is just fine.  I had a lot of fun exploring until I realized how little there was that was ACTUALLY INTERESTING when it came to exploring.  More boring ship battles, more bounty hunts that take place in a completely open featureless area, lots of little dungeons that are each quite lovely and beautiful but only few of which were of any real interest (not mentioning them here because no spoilers), etc.

 

I had a lot more fun with the setting of Deadfire than I ever did with Dyrwood.  Act 1 (Gilded Vale etc) was different enough to be interesting, what with the Hollowborn crisis and stuff, but by time I reached Act 2 I was like "oh this is just a Greyhawk/Forgotten Realms clone."  I think that was half the point of setting the game in the Dyrwood, though - to ease players into the setting with something that feels familiar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem with deadfire is the level of urgency that "should" be felt. You have very clear objectives and a very urgent problem. Which jars with all the side quests.

 

POE 1 sort of escaped this as you were following lead rather than a single clear directive. Plus the urgency Of, maybe goin insane at some point, isn't quite as high.

 

Same with BG1

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anytime someone calls story or characters "bland", I read "I don't really want to play this game". This argument is just so vague and subjective. It's alright, you are not supposed to want to play every game, all the time. When you get in the mood for it, the characters won't seem "bland" and then you'll start it again and get into it.

  • Like 5

A Custom Editor for Deadfire's Data:
eFoHp9V.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Also I do not see how all that one can take out of this setting is that it's a "pirate setting". Far as I'm concerned that's a fairly secondary element to the setting that sets the tone to a couple of quests but hardly to the setting as a whole. To say it's a "pirate setting" is to ignore the many other elements that are present and are arguably as important or more in defining the region's feel, such as the many colonial themes what with the cultural clash, the Dorado hysteria present in the search for Ukaizo, the pioneering drive and progressivism classic of the Renaissance era, all mixed too with the touch of metempsychosis and metaphysics that lend the setting a particularly otherworldly vibe... To say this is a pirate setting is about as reductionist as claiming the Dyrwood is just a medieval Europe fantasy land.

 

 

 

The piracy theme is just one party of the greater whole.  The setting sort of feels like the Caribbean meets the political intrigue of Renaissance Europe. 

 

I love the setting very much, it's immersive and exciting and tons of fun...but it's not terribly original, it's just the Maluka Archipelago circa the 16th century translated into a fantasy setting. That's all it is. I don't mean that in a derogatory fashion; these aren't themes that are commonly explored in video games and it's a setting that isn't commonly seen in a video game, both of which are really cool. I just mean that it isn't some masterpiece of uniqueness and originality.

 

 

Originality in a traditional fantasy setting is going to be more or less impossible at this point.  Tolkien is the grandpappy of fantasy settings and you could say that between Greyhawk, Forgotten Realms, and Golarion we've seen all you can possibly see.  Taking disparate real-world cultures and civilizations from various points of history and transplanting them into the setting as discrete nations or realms is standard and expected.  Edo era or Meiji era Japan, various Chinese dynasties (typically Han, Qing, or Song), ancient Rome, ancient Greece, ancient Egypt, medieval Muslim regions (middle east, north africa, and west africa generally), medieval India and sometimes British Raj India, and of course Europe.  Renaissance is less common but can be found in settings that allow early firearms, Da Vinci's sketches made real, etc.  Eora is no different here; at best, we can compare it to Eberron, where the setting uses established tropes and cliches but manages to do a few things creatively with them (for Eora it's the concept of the soul, the wheel, animancy, etc.)

 

Planescape and Numenera are some of the only settings I can think of that I'd genuinely say are pretty original.  Monte Cook usually has THAT going for him, if nothing else.

2b6zqs.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This game was utterly ruined for me with 2 primary things: Spoilers/Quest trigger problems and Import/World State problems.

 

When my import of the previous game was broken, and the World State creator thing in 2 didn't include many of the options you had in 1 I was massively disappointed.

 

Then, the game allowed me to go places and do things that I didn't have a quest for yet, and the quest would get all broken when I got it later. Including the final quest choices, which never triggered; so I wasn't able to complete the game with the faction I wanted to.

 

Then there's the journal spoiler; if you complete one of the companion quests before doing the story, which the game allows you to do, the journal update for that quest gives away the plot for the entire game. Before you've done any of the story missions beyond getting the boat fixed.

 

Oh, and don't forget that the destruction of the entire story/quest system was worth less than 1 minute in their dev discussion after launch. They appear to give zero ****s that the quest triggers are utterly ****ed, and that they spoil the game in at least one journal entry.

 

I haven't played this game in about 2-3 weeks. I have told everyone I know not to bother with it. The MOST important thing in this game, the story, was handled like it was done by monkeys at a zoo, and they haven't spent more than a minute that i've seen addressing that.

 

I also happen to think the combat is stale and far too easy, and the romance's are totally worthless; and not because the dialogue/rep system is broken: I completed a romance with someone, and they never mentioned it again. For 10's of hours in game, the person I love and who loved me treated me the same as if I had never started a romance with them. We had sex, then forgot we had a romance.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quest triggers are my biggest problem as well. I enjoy the exploring part, but it messes up both current quests and quests not yet discovered. Which is a bummer since the main quest isn't particularily exciting..

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you guys realize that you can hover your mouse over the Valian words (among other things) during the dialogs and it'll pop up a little window describing the meaning of the word in question?   Very nice little feature that I didn't realize was there for quite a while until I noticed that certain words in the dialog text were of a slightly different color.

 

 

He realizes that but he's complaining that you can't read the dialogue with only your keyboard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2: I wish to hell I could see all these romances... everyone keeps complaining about it happening too quickly, I haven't had anyone say anything remotely romantic - this is supposed to be a fantasy not my real life!

 

3: Not a fan of the open thing either... I have no idea if I should explore or just go after the god statue... and there are now so many quests and weird names of people that I just don't care much about them any more - I have lost track of who is who and why I should do what they asked. I just want finish them... any quest - just to remove it from my ever-growing list.

 

4: Some of the quests are boring but some are good... its not what I was hoping for though. I  really would have been happy with  a new quests and stories with the PoE gameplay and world (maybe with DC for those that need that - I don't). I'm sort of not bored, but I really don't have any desire to play it any more. The game is just too big, open and unstructured and the list of strange named people and places just puts me off. Maybe if I stick at it I will change my mind, I just don't know if I can be bothered to stick with it. I think maybe just watching a few youtube  games (immanuel can for example) would have been enough for me. I don't actually feel much like playing it myself - maybe pirates aren't just my thing

Edited by ArnoldRimmer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3: Not a fan of the open thing either... I have no idea if I should explore or just go after the god statue... and there are now so many quests and weird names of people that I just don't care much about them any more - I have lost track of who is who and why I should do what they asked. I just want finish them... any quest - just to remove it from my ever-growing list.

 

I also don't like these open games. Here I found a nice way to proceed - I try to go after the main quest only and I don't care about the side quests at all - until the next stage of the main quest shows 2 or more skulls. This is a signal that I should level up somewhat, so now I am motivated to do some sidequests. This approach kept me focused during my first playthrough, the game stayed challenging even though I played on classic and there are still many sidequests left for my next playthroughs that I haven't seen yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...