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The drinking thread


ShadySands

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I really like red and the occasional white. Been more of a beer drinker, and wine tends to give me headaches more. I can't say I follow certain wine brands yet.

 

I tend to like cabs.

 

I should get wine more often though, solely for cooking purposes.

Sauces based on wine can be amazing yeah. I often use white wine when making risotto as well (a dish that incidentally pairs amazing with reds). In general I try to avoid it though as cheap wine is pretty damn expensive here.

 

As for headaches, I get those too, but only when I don't drink enough water.

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https://vinepair.com/wine-101/wine-and-headaches

 

Culprit One – Tannins: 

As we discussed in our tannins post, tannins are naturally occurring compounds that exist inside grape skins, seeds and stems. You experience the effect of tannins any time you drink a wine that creates a drying sensation in your mouth, and for the majority of us, tannins create no headache at all. In fact, tannins are a great antioxidant source.But, if you seem to get headaches from wine more often when you drink red wine, such as Cabernet Sauvignon or Malbec, you can do a quick test to see if tannins are the source of your headache trouble. Brew a cup of black tea and let the tea steep for five or ten minutes longer than the package suggests. Black tea is strong in tannins and over-steeping the tea will ensure they are all released into the water. Drink the tea and see if you get a headache. If so, you are susceptible to tannins and avoiding red wines will solve your headache issue.
 
Culprit Two – Sugar:
Alcohol and sugar are two substances that when combined can create a powerful headache. When your body consumes alcohol or sugar, you need lots of water in order to help process the substances. If you are not well hydrated, your body starts to pull the necessary water it needs from other parts or your body, including your head. As the liquid in your head starts to deplete, a headache forms.To prevent this problem, avoid sweet dessert wines and white wines such as Riesling that are labeled semi-dry or sweet (if you enjoy Riesling but don’t want the sugar headache, make sure the wine is labeled as dry). Also to be avoided are cheaper wines, which tend to have more sugar due to the fact that mass producers add sugar during fermentation in order to boost the alcohol.
 
Culprit Three – Histamines:
Histamines are chemicals that are released when we have an allergic reaction and can cause symptoms such as a runny nose, dry eyes and a headache. Recent research has found that food and drinks that have been aged, such as dry aged meats and red wines, can cause our body to release histamines and create these allergy-type symptoms. To prevent a histamine headache, simply take a histamine blocker such as Claritin prior to having a glass of red wine.
Let’s repeat: for most of us, the cause of a wine headache is simply drinking too much wine and not enough water. The mythical wine headache cure? It’s simple: the cure for a wine headache is to stop one it before it ever starts. 
Edited by ShadySands
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Free games updated 3/4/21

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Yeah, I have a lot of allergies and have been amply loaded up on gobs of anti-histamines when drinking a class.

 

Tannins might be a culprit, I mostly only drink herbal teas now. That is also due to them being caffeine free and the diuretic nature of caffeine + the lowkey anxious buzz just means I can't get cozy to normal tea anymore.

 

Water? Yeah, I drink a lot of water but a little too much salt hear or forgetting to drink for 2 hours there can really **** me up. I don't remember needing this much water as a kid. I don't mean by volume, I mean the constant need to have a water bottle on hand.

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I've noticed I'm getting sucrose intolerant in my old age, like, I need less and less sweet stuff and stuff too sweet tastes yucky. Meaning I cannot enjoy Hoegaarden no more, too sweet. :(

 

While I myself have problems with sugar just like yourself, I recall Hoegaarden being pretty tasty the few times I got to drink it.

 

 

That's exactly why I am sad -- it used to be so tasty for me until it wasn't anymore.  ;( I miss that feeling.

 

As for wines, the colour red is obviously the culprit of headaches. Never get them from whites, never get them from black tea that I drink by gallons, only red wine, the redder, the acher. Kinda bummer, since I prefer Shiraz to Cabernet or Merlot, but eh. Totally can do without wines whatsoever (bastards also give me heartburn), just lemme at my beers. 

 

Beers can be used for cooking purposes too -- stouts make for super tasty sauce with beef.  :yes:

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I had a Portuguese white a couple of days ago called Xisto Cru 2016 by Luis Seabra. Pretty much the best white I've ever had in that class ($30-35). Delicate nose of apples and beeswax. Balanced, fresh, concentrated fruit, minerals, long dry ending with notes of grapefruit. Recommended strongly if you can get a hold of it. The winemaker also makes a damn good Alvarinho. Wasn't as impressed by his red wines.

 

Going with a Portuguese red today, by Luis Pato. Gonna try to pair it with Entrecote and bearnaise sauce. Generally you want wine with tannins to go along with red meat, but the sauce won't match well with that at all. So I'm gonna go with a wine that supposedly has both the fruit and the acidity to stand on good legs alongside the dish.

 

The grape is called Baga, one of the most up and coming of the 250ish (!) grape varieties from Portugal.

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My favorite gin drink is something I like to call the Bombay Sapphire and you don't have to use Bombay Sapphire gin either. Gin and a dry ginger ale and just enough blue curacao to make it the same color as the bottle the drink is named after. Sweet without being cloying and as strong as you want to make it. I generally serve it on the rocks. 

Edited by ShadySands

Free games updated 3/4/21

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I'm having some Motörhead rum. The bottle is gorgeous and the rum is actually quite good. I normally like my rum a bit more sweeter and "deeper" in its taste, this is more on the kinda fruity or citrusy side of things, a bit more bright, but it's pretty nice.

Listen to my home-made recordings (some original songs, some not): http://www.youtube.c...low=grid&view=0

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  • 2 weeks later...

Coppertail Brewery will now deliver beer to you by drone. At long last the the beer run has been reversed! http://coppertailbrewing.com/drone?fbclid=IwAR2txA4ztIrc71craZvMD-cI9PWA4SPGdDmD9IvwbOforyNpL4QLyV4L8nc

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3yCcXgbKrE 

Edited by Guard Dog
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"What can't be changed must be endured"

Robert Jordan

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Never met a stout that I liked but Ill keep my eyes peeled based on your recommendation. 

 

qid-collage.png

 

Don't know if Iron Horse distributes in your area, (they're local for us) but this is one of the best stouts we've tried that isn't our own. Very smooth. They make a seasonal stout too, Cozy Sweater, that's even smoother.

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I haven't had much alcohol until recently and I've noticed that I'm having a hard time getting a light buzz. I've nearly killed a bottle of Malibu Black (regular Malibu rum is too sweet) and a bottle of Kraken. I'm not trying to brag about tolerance or anything as I'm still getting some of the negative effects of alcohol just not getting any of the good ones except for the delicious taste of both coconut and spiced rums.

 

Could it be some interaction with medication?

Free games updated 3/4/21

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  • 2 weeks later...

we do not drink alcoholic beverages, so posting in this thread may be quixotic, but...

George Washington’s “To Brew A Small Beer

Michael Stein and Peter Jones

Ingredients

4 lb Light Dry Malt Extract
1 lb flaked oats
.5 lb two row malt
12 oz molasses
1 total ounce of cluster hops
 

Heat 3 gallons of water to 155 degrees.
Add flaked oats and .5 two row malt in malt bag to water. Steep for 45 minutes.
Remove grain bag. Start heating to boil. Add “first wort hop addition” .25 oz Cluster hops to kettle
Stir occasionally as rise to boil. Add Dry Malt Extract. Note time of first boil.
Add .25 oz Cluster hops 30 minutes after first boil.
45 minutes after boil- let chiller sanitize, add molasses.
55 minutes after boil, add .5 oz Cluster Hops.
60 minutes after boil, turn off heat. Add one gallon of water.
Start chilling. Chill to below 90 degrees. Take specific gravity reading. Add water until you hit your desired gravity reading.
Transfer to carboy, add yeast to wort (under 80 degrees, lower the better). Install airlock.
Relax, Don’t worry, have a homebrew.
Check fermentation after 1-2 weeks for krausen or lack thereof. Check gravity.
Check gravity 3 days later. If the same, you can safely bottle.

https://www.si.edu/sidedoor/ep-2-red-white-and-brew

"of all the founding fathers, he was the beer geek."  speaking of thomas jefferson.  jefferson's brewmaster were peter hemings, the brother of the famous sally hemings.

regardless, if hurl wants to recreate george washington's beer, he may do so.

HA! Good Fun!

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"If there be time to expose through discussion the falsehood and fallacies, to avert the evil by the processes of education, the remedy to be applied is more speech, not enforced silence."Justice Louis Brandeis, Concurring, Whitney v. California, 274 U.S. 357 (1927)

"Im indifferent to almost any murder as long as it doesn't affect me or mine."--Gfted1 (September 30, 2019)

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I'm enjoying my third glass of Garrison Brothers Whiskey. It's a Texas version of good ole Kentucky sour mash. It has a much more robust taste than regular bourbon. The whiskey "burn" is pronounced and the aftertaste has definite notes of cinnamon. I guess at least. I've lost my ability to taste somewhere between this glass and the last. Can't wait to see what happens after glass four. 

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"What can't be changed must be endured"

Robert Jordan

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  • 3 weeks later...

After doing some garden work this morning I made a ice cold whiskey sour using my latest sampling:

 

american_freedom_sbw_bottle_26bbd11f-a8c

 

I've had more than half the bottle neat. If you are interested in my opinion I'd describe the taste as rich and "toasty" with a good hint of oak from the aging (a fresh but slightly smoky taste) with hints of molasses from the wort. The afterburn is long (owing to it high alcohol content for bourbon) that favors the barley from the mashbill. In short... it's pretty good for a non-Kentucky bourbon.  I'd put it above Maker's Mark and Knob Creek blended but below other small batch brands like Woodbridge and Four Roses. On a scale of 1-10 I'd say 8.6

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"What can't be changed must be endured"

Robert Jordan

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