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Amentep

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17 minutes ago, Lexx said:

Wasn't there a payout limit or something? Like, you can only sell x amount in time y?

Not that I’ve ever heard of. Wouldn’t know though. I’ve only made one transaction. I bought the one I have a never did anything with it or tried to sell it

"The man of virtuous soul commands not, nor obeys. Power, like a desolating pestilence, pollutes whate'er it touches; and obedience, bane of all genius, virtue, freedom, truth, makes slaves of men, and of the human frame a mechanized automaton."

P.B. Shelley

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26 minutes ago, Gfted1 said:

To be clear, you can login to your Ewallet, trade in the bitcoin for 20k, and they will wire the cash to your bank? 

No your account with whatever exchange you have will be credited. Minus a fee. Moving it elsewhere is something you’ll have to do yourself. 

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"The man of virtuous soul commands not, nor obeys. Power, like a desolating pestilence, pollutes whate'er it touches; and obedience, bane of all genius, virtue, freedom, truth, makes slaves of men, and of the human frame a mechanized automaton."

P.B. Shelley

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https://thehackernews.com/2020/12/exfiltrating-data-from-air-gapped.html

A security researcher has demonstrated that sensitive data could be exfiltrated from air-gapped computers via a novel technique that leverages Wi-Fi signals as a covert channel—surprisingly, without requiring the presence of Wi-Fi hardware on the targeted systems.

Dubbed "AIR-FI," the attack hinges on deploying a specially designed malware in a compromised system that exploits "DDR SDRAM buses to generate electromagnetic emissions in the 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi bands" and transmitting information atop these frequencies that can then be intercepted and decoded by nearby Wi-Fi capable devices such as smartphones, laptops, and IoT devices before sending the data to remote servers controlled by an attacker.

The findings were published today in a paper titled "AIR-FI: Generating Covert Wi-Fi Signals from Air-Gapped Computers" by Dr. Mordechai Guri, the head of R&D at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev's Cyber-Security Research Center, Israel.

"Cuius testiculos habeas, habeas cardia et cerebellum."

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That's certainly more fun than guessing what the CPU does based on the noise it makes. Easier to pull off too by the looks of it. :)

Give me the eyes, so I see
Give me ears, so I hear
Give me love, so I know what love is
Give me freedom to think, to believe
In something
                        -- Tony Kakko

 

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Microsoft unleashes ‘Death Star’ on SolarWinds hackers in extraordinary response to breach - GeekWire

This week Microsoft took a series of dramatic steps against the recent SolarWinds supply chain attack. In the size, speed and scope of its actions, Microsoft has reminded the world that it can still muster firepower like no one else as a nearly-overwhelming force for good.

Through four steps over four days, Microsoft flexed the muscle of its legal team and its control of the Windows operating system to nearly obliterate the actions of some of the most sophisticated offensive hackers out there. In this case, the adversary is believed to be APT29, aka Cozy Bear, the group many believe to be associated with Russian intelligence, and best known for carrying out the 2016 hack against the Democratic National Committee (DNC).

"Cuius testiculos habeas, habeas cardia et cerebellum."

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Yeah, nah, that ain't a great article to be frank.

Perhaps most indicative is that the 10 year MS veteran didn't mention that MS was involved in the hack distribution too. To use Star Wars parlance Imperial Shuttles had been distributing rebel strike teams all across the Empire for six months. Something something older code but it checked out. Reads pretty much entirely like corporate damage control.

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132199929_10225256277979115_730842437261

Text reads: "If you EVER think Anthony Head is anything less than an angel then you’d best remember that I have always been a huge fan of his and we’ve always had a little contact over the years and he heard I’d come out as Trans and was having a hard time and that I was kind of sad that the photos I had from conventions with him were of me with long hair and no binder and they were all signed to “Sarah” and so he invited me to spend the day with him at his farm and he picked me up from the station and we just hung out and had lunch and he insisted on paying and took loads of photos and had them printed on photo paper the same day so he could sign them to Jay, along with other photos of him as Giles and Uther and he literally spent five hours chatting with me and got all of the pronoun stuff right every time and then he dropped me off at the station, gave me a final massive hug, waved me through the ticket barrier and insisted I message him when I got home so he knew I got back safe."

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"Cuius testiculos habeas, habeas cardia et cerebellum."

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4 hours ago, Raithe said:

79ef28d98755682c7ae9592a4e130b8d.jpg

German astronomer Karl Schwarzschild computed the first exact solution of Einstein's theory of general relativity while serving on the Eastern front during WW1. This led to the derivation of the Schwarzschild radius of a non-rotating black hole. He developed pemphigus while at the front and died of it the following year. What a waste.

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"It has just been discovered that research causes cancer in rats."

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I wonder if this family is going to the suspect in every criminal case where there are "no fingerprints"?

 

"The men in Apu's family appear to share a genetic mutation so rare it is thought to affect only a small handful of families in the world: they have no fingerprints."

...

"n 2008, when Apu was still a boy, Bangladesh introduced National ID cards for all adults, and the database required a thumbprint. The baffled employees did not know how to issue a card to Apu's father, Amal Sarker. Finally, he received a card with "NO FINGERPRINT" stamped on it."

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-55301200

 

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“He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would surely suffice.” - Albert Einstein

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Why We Can’t Stop Longing for the Good Old Days

WSJ but no paywall on this article for some reason. @Gromnir has hit this point a few times and it made me think. I was reminded of it again reading this piece. People pine for a "good old days" that, objectively speaking, were not all that good.  But, individual frame of reference goes a long way to color your idea of what the "good old days" were. Especially if it's within your lifetime. 

Just curious though. If you could live anywhere and at any time other than this one, where do you go and why? For me it's a no brainer. I'd choose the life of a free trapper in the pre-civil war American west. Settlers had been drifting west the entire 19th century but after the end of the Civil War Manifest Destiny really hit the gas and f----d the whole thing up. I'd have loved to have seen it before that. 

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"The man of virtuous soul commands not, nor obeys. Power, like a desolating pestilence, pollutes whate'er it touches; and obedience, bane of all genius, virtue, freedom, truth, makes slaves of men, and of the human frame a mechanized automaton."

P.B. Shelley

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12 hours ago, Guard Dog said:

 

Just curious though. If you could live anywhere and at any time other than this one, where do you go and why? For me it's a no brainer. I'd choose the life of a free trapper in the pre-civil war American west. Settlers had been drifting west the entire 19th century but after the end of the Civil War Manifest Destiny really hit the gas and f----d the whole thing up. I'd have loved to have seen it before that. 

For me, I really need a time period with decent plumbing and toilet paper. Also, antibiotics are nice.

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15 hours ago, Guard Dog said:

Why We Can’t Stop Longing for the Good Old Days

WSJ but no paywall on this article for some reason. @Gromnir has hit this point a few times and it made me think. I was reminded of it again reading this piece. People pine for a "good old days" that, objectively speaking, were not all that good.  But, individual frame of reference goes a long way to color your idea of what the "good old days" were. Especially if it's within your lifetime. 

Just curious though. If you could live anywhere and at any time other than this one, where do you go and why? For me it's a no brainer. I'd choose the life of a free trapper in the pre-civil war American west. Settlers had been drifting west the entire 19th century but after the end of the Civil War Manifest Destiny really hit the gas and f----d the whole thing up. I'd have loved to have seen it before that. 

 

2 hours ago, Hurlshot said:

For me, I really need a time period with decent plumbing and toilet paper. Also, antibiotics are nice.

I'd be dead without modern medicine, but if I was able to control all variables? Maybe hunter/gatherer I suppose.

If not, I'd like to be born in about 40 years. Either we've advanced quite a bit or things have gone all way to post apocalypse. Either way, win/win.

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Civilization, in fact, grows more and more maudlin and hysterical; especially under democracy it tends to degenerate into a mere combat of crazes; the whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, most of them imaginary. - H.L. Mencken

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2 hours ago, Hurlshot said:

For me, I really need a time period with decent plumbing and toilet paper. Also, antibiotics are nice.

1929 checks those boxes LOL! Actually here’s how I know there’s no such thing as time travel. Nobody was short selling US steel and Standard Oil in August of ‘29.

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"The man of virtuous soul commands not, nor obeys. Power, like a desolating pestilence, pollutes whate'er it touches; and obedience, bane of all genius, virtue, freedom, truth, makes slaves of men, and of the human frame a mechanized automaton."

P.B. Shelley

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4 hours ago, ShadySands said:

I don't think I'd be able to get along in times much beyond maybe the 1970s. Beyond modern comforts I'd need a time and place where I could speak the one language I know and my race wouldn't be a factor. 

I think even the 70's might be too far back on that last count. 

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"The man of virtuous soul commands not, nor obeys. Power, like a desolating pestilence, pollutes whate'er it touches; and obedience, bane of all genius, virtue, freedom, truth, makes slaves of men, and of the human frame a mechanized automaton."

P.B. Shelley

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