Jump to content

The 'Sidian Tyranny thread


Recommended Posts

I'm really beginning to grow tired of seeing that haircut, I realise fashion dicates a slavish devotion to conformity but surely we can see something a little different on the "tough girl" archetype?

 

Mind you I never particularly liked it when Phil Oakey was pioneering it back in the Human League, perhaps its just a personal thing.

Quite an experience to live in misery isn't it? That's what it is to be married with children.

I've seen things you people can't even imagine. Pearly Kings glittering on the Elephant and Castle, Morris Men dancing 'til the last light of midsummer. I watched Druid fires burning in the ruins of Stonehenge, and Yorkshiremen gurning for prizes. All these things will be lost in time, like alopecia on a skinhead. Time for tiffin.

 

Tea for the teapot!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like the bright red crest on top of the blue mullet myself. It reminds me of Sotek-aligned Skinks! And her hair is out of her face, so, improvement!

 

This prompts a question i've always wanted to ask: Dyes such as the young lady is wearing in her hair, and that are presumably used on clothing, how expensive are good ones in this Bronze Age setting? How many washes can they stand before fading? Are there specific creatures, ores or plants that are needed to cultivate the best dyes, and what prices do these command? Can an average citizen of Kyras' tyranny afford these in any quantity?

 

Also clothing, so far we have seen the usual CRPG rig, trousers, shirts, yadda, yadda. However what climate are the levels set in, is it Mediterranean, Scandinavian? What clothing is suitable here in what season, is a simple tunic enough like any Roman citizen would wear most of the year? Would an infantryman wear hobnailed sandals or boots, and why? Is their a particular or unique environment here, and if so why is it unique, or what is the best guess if a mystery?

 

I'd like to know a few of these things, as well as many more to be hones. I realise they are not important to many but I think depth and detail in a world can really pay off when developers try and flesh that world out and take advantage of such things to make exciting organic changes to a setting, its cultures and societies.

  • Like 1

Quite an experience to live in misery isn't it? That's what it is to be married with children.

I've seen things you people can't even imagine. Pearly Kings glittering on the Elephant and Castle, Morris Men dancing 'til the last light of midsummer. I watched Druid fires burning in the ruins of Stonehenge, and Yorkshiremen gurning for prizes. All these things will be lost in time, like alopecia on a skinhead. Time for tiffin.

 

Tea for the teapot!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I typically don't follow games before they're released. I might a little bit, but I like to preserve my enjoyment. I'm stopped smack dab in the middle of a Pillars game because I'd heard too much about the expansions. I'd finished it once and I was working on the path of the damned run when I stopped playing, but I look forward to finishing it after some of the basic plot twists have become lost to my aged mind.

 

I'm seriously jonesing for Tyranny, and my curiosity got the better of me, but I figure it's early enough in the development that I needn't worry too much. I like what I see so far. It could be merely good or it could be absolutely awesome. I guess I'll go back to Way Off Topic and get the joy of discovery whenever they ship the game.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I like the bright red crest on top of the blue mullet myself. It reminds me of Sotek-aligned Skinks! And her hair is out of her face, so, improvement!

 

This prompts a question i've always wanted to ask: Dyes such as the young lady is wearing in her hair, and that are presumably used on clothing, how expensive are good ones in this Bronze Age setting? How many washes can they stand before fading? Are there specific creatures, ores or plants that are needed to cultivate the best dyes, and what prices do these command? Can an average citizen of Kyras' tyranny afford these in any quantity?

 

Dyed by the blood of her enemies, naturally :D

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

I like the bright red crest on top of the blue mullet myself. It reminds me of Sotek-aligned Skinks! And her hair is out of her face, so, improvement!

 

This prompts a question i've always wanted to ask: Dyes such as the young lady is wearing in her hair, and that are presumably used on clothing, how expensive are good ones in this Bronze Age setting? How many washes can they stand before fading? Are there specific creatures, ores or plants that are needed to cultivate the best dyes, and what prices do these command? Can an average citizen of Kyras' tyranny afford these in any quantity?

 

Dyed by the blood of her enemies, naturally :D

 

Halloween release date confirmed

  • Like 1

Free games updated 3/4/21

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dyed by the blood of her enemies, naturally :D

Well to be fair, red-ish henna hair dyes were used all the way back in Egypt, so I suppose it's not that of a long shot. My question would be what kind of product she uses to get her hair to be so spiky, that has to be magic, right? :-P
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The product is called Cloudy Strife, it needs to be imported though.

Edited by Mamoulian War
  • Like 4

Sent from my Stone Tablet, using Chisel-a-Talk 2000BC.

My youtube channel: MamoulianFH Latest Let's Play Tales of Arise (completed)

Let's Play/AAR Europa Universalis 1: Austria Grand Campaign (completed)
Let's Play/AAR Europa Universalis 2: Xhosa Grand Campaign (completed)
My PS Platinums and 100% - 28 games so far (my PSN profile)

 

 

1) God of War III - PS3 - 24+ hours

2) Final Fantasy XIII - PS3 - 130+ hours

3) White Knight Chronicles International Edition - PS3 - 525+ hours

4) Hyperdimension Neptunia - PS3 - 80+ hours

5) Final Fantasy XIII-2 - PS3 - 200+ hours

6) Tales of Xillia - PS3 - 135+ hours

7) Hyperdimension Neptunia mk2 - PS3 - 152+ hours

8.) Grand Turismo 6 - PS3 - 81+ hours (including Senna Master DLC)

9) Demon's Souls - PS3 - 197+ hours

10) Tales of Graces f - PS3 - 337+ hours

11) Star Ocean: The Last Hope International - PS3 - 750+ hours

12) Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII - PS3 - 127+ hours

13) Soulcalibur V - PS3 - 73+ hours

14) Gran Turismo 5 - PS3 - 600+ hours

15) Tales of Xillia 2 - PS3 - 302+ hours

16) Mortal Kombat XL - PS4 - 95+ hours

17) Project CARS Game of the Year Edition - PS4 - 120+ hours

18) Dark Souls - PS3 - 197+ hours

19) Hyperdimension Neptunia Victory - PS3 - 238+ hours

20) Final Fantasy Type-0 - PS4 - 58+ hours

21) Journey - PS4 - 9+ hours

22) Dark Souls II - PS3 - 210+ hours

23) Fairy Fencer F - PS3 - 215+ hours

24) Megadimension Neptunia VII - PS4 - 160 hours

25) Super Neptunia RPG - PS4 - 44+ hours

26) Journey - PS3 - 22+ hours

27) Final Fantasy XV - PS4 - 263+ hours (including all DLCs)

28) Tales of Arise - PS4 - 111+ hours

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

I like the bright red crest on top of the blue mullet myself. It reminds me of Sotek-aligned Skinks! And her hair is out of her face, so, improvement!

 

This prompts a question i've always wanted to ask: Dyes such as the young lady is wearing in her hair, and that are presumably used on clothing, how expensive are good ones in this Bronze Age setting? How many washes can they stand before fading? Are there specific creatures, ores or plants that are needed to cultivate the best dyes, and what prices do these command? Can an average citizen of Kyras' tyranny afford these in any quantity?

 

Dyed by the blood of her enemies, naturally :D

 

 

You'd ideally need a thickening agent I assume as the head wounds i've sustained in Rugby, though bleeding profusely, tended to wash away very easily. Perhaps some kind of mud or clay? Trollslayers used bearfat in Warhammer as I remember as well as the orange dye.

 

I've noticed some amusing names surfacing, Gonzoella, Roostergirl etc, due no doubt to the crest.

Quite an experience to live in misery isn't it? That's what it is to be married with children.

I've seen things you people can't even imagine. Pearly Kings glittering on the Elephant and Castle, Morris Men dancing 'til the last light of midsummer. I watched Druid fires burning in the ruins of Stonehenge, and Yorkshiremen gurning for prizes. All these things will be lost in time, like alopecia on a skinhead. Time for tiffin.

 

Tea for the teapot!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing new, but I quite liked Vox Ludicus' summary of the roles our character and the (revealed as of this time) companions will play in the game :

 

https://voxludicus.com/2016/08/09/the-characters-of-tryanny/

 

Some Tyranny artwork apparently hung in the halls of Paradox's offices :

 

https://twitter.com/PdxInteractive/status/762638437975457792

Edited by Sannom
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So we have the Tin Man, Dorothy (who killed Toto,) and the Wizard now. All we need are a scarecrow, a cowardly lion and a couple of directional Witches.

 

We're off to see the Overlord, the Overlord Kyros.

Because, because, because, because...

Because of the terrible things he does.

Edited by Nonek
  • Like 2

Quite an experience to live in misery isn't it? That's what it is to be married with children.

I've seen things you people can't even imagine. Pearly Kings glittering on the Elephant and Castle, Morris Men dancing 'til the last light of midsummer. I watched Druid fires burning in the ruins of Stonehenge, and Yorkshiremen gurning for prizes. All these things will be lost in time, like alopecia on a skinhead. Time for tiffin.

 

Tea for the teapot!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interview that was accidentally published: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:0r2bcsRV7QAJ:www.gamerevolution.com/features/interview-writers-for-obsidians-tyranny-on-writing-evil-and-surviving-a-tyrannical-world+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=il

 

Developer Obsidian reintroduced the complexity and difficulty of classic cRPGs with Pillars of Eternity, which was just as successful upon release as it was with its Kickstarter campaign. Now that they have seen success with a cRPG, the team was eager to create another, but this time, there is no good vs. evil. In Tyranny, there is only the means to survive by being manipulative, strong, and staying somewhere between neutral neutral and chaotic evil.

Not long after presenting how the game will play at E3, the writing team began to publish short stories on the Tyranny blog. Their idea was to present a bit of what we can expect with the various factions in the game as well as just how dark the environment will be. I had an opportunity to talk with the Narrative Design Team about these short stories and about writing evil for Tyranny.

GameRevolution: What inspired the dark setting for Tyranny?

Matt Maclean, Lead Narrative Designer: The dark setting was one of the original pillars of the game’s design – ‘what if evil won?’ was the question asked in the earliest pitch documents. So ‘evil setting’ was an owner mandate from day one and as far as design constraints go, that’s a fun burden to have around your neck. Our inspirations included The Black Company, the Fallout series of games, and the ‘what if evil won?’ question was unavoidably read as ‘what if Sauron won?’ so there’s always a little Lord of the Rings in any modern fantasy, though I’m proud to say we don’t have elves or dwarves or a lovable midget race of any kind.

For my own interpretation of the question ‘what if evil won?’ I’ve always assumed the answer would be ‘sounds like real life.’ Evil wins when people learn (or are shaped by ignorance) to accept it as required and normal. So most of my own inspiration for Tyranny has come from real life. I’ve never read a book or seen a movie with a fictional villain as fascinating as Alan Dulles, Qin Shi Huang, or Kim Jong-Il.

GR: Did you take any ideas from books, games, or movies for this environment of evil winning? Which and how?

MacLean: The Black Company was very influential, with is excellent show of a world wherein the cast of characters know the stories and myths of the magical big wigs but are only semi-aware of how it all actually works. Black Company also had a great sense of soldiers-as-people and it didn’t fall into the brash hero/peasant savior nonsense that most fantasy novels can’t help but repeat to death. Myth: The Fallen Lords was also a big influence, with its grim take on the true cost of being a hero. Myth was also inspired by Black Company, and like Myth, Tyranny features magicalsociopaths with personality-driven powers set alongside grim, desperate regular folk trying their best not to die.
A world wherein there’s one big evil dude on top really only works when it’s sold with great big lies that get the average person invested in the evil (or just dependent upon it), instead of willing to resist it. And for evil to win long term, it also needs to be immune to self-implosion (since we’ve all read enough fantasy literature to know that the evil defectors are involved in 9 out of 10 evil regicides), so with that in mind, I’ve found most of my inspiration comes from non-fiction: fascism, American exceptionalism, drug cartels, capitalist corporations, and militaries through the ages have all provided a great deal of inspiration as to how evil wins.

Megan Starks, Narrative Designer: I really like the dark humor in many of the Orcs' lines in the Lord of the Rings movies. I also like to think a bit about some different bad guy groups like the Governor or the people running Terminus in The Walking Dead, the raiders inFallout 3, the reavers in Firefly, US prohibition-era gangsters, or hired gun type characters (whether it be a spy like Brock Samson from the Venture Bros or a sellsword like Bron from Game of Thrones). For examples of good people, or just normal people - both good and not-so-good, caught in situations they don't have much control over (you do what you have to protect your country and/or to survive), I looked at various war movies for inspiration. If these influences seem like they're all over the place, it's because they definitely are. It's good to consume a lot of different types of narratives and character portrayals and blend them together new and interesting ways, in my opinion.

Paul Kirsch, Narrative Designer: I take some inspiration from Michael Moor****’s Elric of Melnibone series – not as much from the sword & sorcery angle as the impression that the protagonist comes from a context so inherently dark that cruelty and atrocity are the benchmarks for normalcy. If doing something unspeakably awful is presented in a casual tone, chances are fair I’m tipping my hat to Elric.

Another of our big themes is power and how it gets wielded. We take a lot of inspiration from Soylent Green – specifically the scene where Charleton Heston is supposed to be investigating a murder and he spends most of the time looting the victim’s upper-class apartment. He’s operating within the rights that his station affords him, he’s being a huge **** about it, but he doesn’t spend a moment questioning the ethics behind this behavior. That’s a good roadmap for understanding how the Fatebinder expresses their authority.

Robert Land, Narrative Designer: I played a lot of D&D growing up and was the DM most of the time so I spent days designing my own worlds and filling them with both good and evil, so I usually tap into those stores if I want something particularly evil to write about. But I love sci-fi, horror, and fantasy, so there's a gigantic mess of twisted ideas roiling around in my brain.

GR: What made you decide to write these short stories for the Tyranny blog?

Kirsch: We wanted to present some emotional / intellectual context for the world of Tyranny, to offer a sense of familiarity when approaching the game as a newcomer. The protagonist of Tyranny didn’t just stumble out of Candlekeep, a blank slate afraid and alone. He or she is a firmly established name in a hierarchy of influential people. They know their way around the world and its many laws, they know how to navigate the power available to them, and this gives them something of an advantage over the comparatively less-experienced player. The stories help to even the playing field as it were, and set the expectations for whatever lies ahead.

Land: Sirin quickly became one of my favorite characters I ever had the chance to develop and as her backstory kept becoming more and more tragic, I wanted the opportunity to tell one of her stories in more detail. She is probably the most powerful Archon on Terratus and the story gives you a little taste of just how powerful she really is.

GR: What do you enjoy most about writing them?

Kirsch: I’ve been working on the game long enough that writing these stories feels like fan fiction. The themes and types of experiences Terratus has to offer are very familiar. That’s quite different from sitting down in front of a blank piece of paper and thinking to myself: “I wonder if this world has clocks. Would they have a bell tower, a sun dial, a cow that wanders by every fifteen minutes? Damn, what do they feed the cow? Where does their water come from? How expensive are candles? How do airships work?”

Land: When you develop a character and really get to know her, you want to tell as much of her story as you can. I loved giving everyone a little more insight into why Sirin is so messed-up.

GR: Do you have a favorite faction to write about/for?

MacLean: My favorite faction to write was the Scarlet Chorus, mostly because it’s a faction of grumpy jerks and I’m a grumpy jerk so it’s a perfect fit. More a lawless mob than a ‘proper’ army, the Scarlet Chorus is made up of folks forced to join or die, with the masses kept in check by aggressive gang leaders who rule as despots until they are challenged and dethroned. The folks in this bloody motley have to be rough, jaded, and darkly optimistic to make it through the day, so they’re all tinged with sass and deceit, and that’s far more fun than writing honest villagers.

Starks: Within each faction, I've grown really fond of several specific characters. As a whole though, I like writing for the Scarlet Chorus. Their unruly attitudes and lack of hygiene has been endlessly fun to imagine and write.

Kirsch: The Disfavored and the Scarlet Chorus are fun for different reasons. As the most militaristic and viciously patriotic, it can be enjoyable to test the Disfavored’s limitations – what a soldier will do for their unit, how they balance their emotions and needs against the needs of the legion, and how their personality measures up to the expectations of the legion.

When it comes to the Scarlet Chorus, this is more fertile ground for creative exploration. No form of psychological manipulation, physical torture, or all-around weirdness is off the table when the Scarlet Chorus is concerned. We’re talking a Fury Road magnitude of diversity and strangeness. Since every gang has its own rules and twisted leadership structure, there isn’t what you’d call uniformity in any gang of Chorus rats.

To answer the question... yes. But I suppose it depends on what sort of day I’m having.

Land: Specific faction? No. But I do love writing evil options. When I play games, I always decide, "I'm going to try the evil path," but when the first choice presents itself, I can't bring myself to do it. But coming up with twisted things for the player to choose? I love doing that!

GR: Are there any plans for extended lore? I need more of those short stories, especially about Crow Trap and the Trap Gang.

Kirsch: Thanks! A friend of mine read “Under New Management” and described the Trap Gang as human jackals. I was pleased that it read that way.

MacLean: Hopefully you’ll find the game to be the extended lore. Some of the folks in the short stories will have cameo appearances in the game and you could spend a good deal of time reading the game’s encyclopedia if your life depended on a serious lore fix.

GR: The short stories suggest there's more to these factions than just burning and pillaging. Will we learn their back stories in the game? And is this indicative of how the narrative and role-playing will run in Tyranny?

Kirsch: If you want to understand the armies of Kyros, there’s no better entry point than the soldiers and Archons. Talk to everyone, take the time to ask questions and figure out who these people are. Even the Chorus understand that their way of life is unsustainable, and that someday the survivors will have to pick up pitchforks and boat oars for their intended purposes. If you’ve explored every dialogue option, we’ll know that we’ve done our job.

GR: Will the stories also touch upon the choices available to players regarding the type of tyrant they can be?

MacLean: We don’t plan to spoil any of the quests in the short stories, but hopefully the short stories give you a better sense of the world, its characters, and its oddities.

Starks: A lot of our stories focus on different characters and groups within the world of Tyranny. As a writer, my hope is that in giving a glimpse into these characters, we're also providing readers with insight into how different people handle the amount of power they have - or don't have - in their daily lives on Terratus. Everyone has their own motivations which, in turn, informs their actions in the face of both conflict and opportunity. Some people are only out for themselves, while others might operate on moral ideals or have a person they want to protect or avenge. Players, too, I think will choose motivations for their character which will then influence the way they progress through their path to power in the Tiers.

GR: Will the gamut of role-playing options run from killing everything just because to strategically ruling the empire with an iron fist?

MacLean: This isn’t a game of running an empire, so it’s safer to say the choices are all about surviving in a world where being a decent person rarely gets you very far. So your options run from deceptive, to abusive, to professional, to charitable, to terrifying, to passively indifferent. Generally speaking, you can attempt to inspire love and loyalty in others, but often that means doing sick and twisted things to earn the affection of evil people. Or if you get sick of people taking advantage of you, you can inspire fear and hostility in others.

Kirsch: The Fatebinder is an extension of Kyros’ law, so their role necessarily covers a lot of ground – anything from the regulation of merchant selling rights to the defense of legal precedent. If “killing everything just because” achieves the goal of bringing Kyros’ Peace to the new frontier, the Overlord is not above offering it as an available solution.

GR: Is there an option to play "nicely"? One who tries to rule with love instead of fear?

MacLean: Rule with love instead of fear? So you mean emotional blackmail and guilt? You can play as a ‘nice’ character within reason, the game doesn’t really have a ‘save the orphanage’ side quest, so being good in Tyranny often means less glamorous acts of goodness, like showing restraint and not answering violence with more violence, or lying to save lives.

Starks: You can certainly try. icon_wink.gif Actually, I think there will be plenty of nice tyrants taking over the Tiers. My husband plays one for example (while I play the more evil route). The game forces you to make some tough decisions, but ultimately the decision is still yours. What are you willing or not willing to do for the greater good? What about for your own self-interest or even, maybe, for your own survival?

Kirsch: Just because the Fatebinder comes from a bad place doesn’t make them Alex from A Clockwork Orange. The difference here is that “nice” doesn’t necessarily correspond to “right” in the same way that “evil” doesn’t correspond to “wrong.” Being wicked to someone might just get you the better result because that’s what this war demands.

GR: What kind of tyrant would you be?

MacLean: I would tax/imprison/kill people for having children, using fossil fuels, and wasting resources. And I won’t force people to eat other humans, but it will be subsidized until we learn to live within the limits of the planet. And I'd establish a court wherein you can prove your innocence by fighting a polar bear.

Starks: When I play video games, I like to stick to a lightly principled "do good things to good people and do bad things to bad people," but I also find chaos and the unexpected to be really fun and interesting. Surprising characters is particularly enjoyable. So I would definitely play a chaotic neutral Fatebinder. I'm always out for myself above all else - if it serves my own interests, I'll go for it regardless of the consequences to other characters.

Kirsch: I would be the innocuous-looking page who stands beside the throne holding a candelabrum or a very long scroll. You would never imagine that I was the head of the empire, or that the person sitting the throne is effectively a scarecrow meant to deflect assassination attempts away from me.

Land: I'd like to think I'd be the tyrant with the heart of gold, but who knows what would happen if I were presented with real power. But if my game-play experience is any indication, the first time I had a chance to be evil, I'd take the good choice instead.

Thank you all so much for your time. I know I'm even more excited about Tyranny and the opportunity to play a game where being good gets you nowhere. Tyranny is set to release later this year in 2016.

 

Edited by Infinitron
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well some of the inspiration is quite promising I must say, Elric Kinslayer, Myth (and therefore the early Black Company novels) and Soylent Green especially. I'm not sure they can quite get away with the level of sadism that the Melniboneans were depicted as possessing, after all they had thousands of years and the assistance of Arioch in their depravities, but it's nice to see them reaching for and referencing that decadent, lazily malicious sickness.

 

The Fallen Lords being akin to the Archons really hadn't struck me 'til now, this definitely places the game on a more interesting plateau for me.

  • Like 1

Quite an experience to live in misery isn't it? That's what it is to be married with children.

I've seen things you people can't even imagine. Pearly Kings glittering on the Elephant and Castle, Morris Men dancing 'til the last light of midsummer. I watched Druid fires burning in the ruins of Stonehenge, and Yorkshiremen gurning for prizes. All these things will be lost in time, like alopecia on a skinhead. Time for tiffin.

 

Tea for the teapot!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...