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Nidrolok

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About Nidrolok

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  1. That's not what people argue about, it's whether romances have a place is PE or not that's up for debate. Would they add something to the game and could they be done in an adequate manner? Do they detract from the narrative or cheapen it in some way? Do they fit within the focus of the game? Such are the questions that are being asked, it's not as simple as liking or disliking romances in general.
  2. Yes, it would surely do so. Connecting things to weather and date could also be done with very interesting results, it's almost certainly beyond the scope of Project Eternity but it is something that's not utilized often enough in modern CRPGs. The more the gameworld affects the gameplay the better.
  3. Shouldn't the player decide what the line means? A well written line in a Role-Playing game should be able to be delivered in a number of different ways. Trying to be as ambiguous as possible when writing dialogues has very bland results and that is not something I would like to see in this game. Anyway, I'd much rather see a wholly different approach to conversational skill checks all together than what's offered in the infinity engine games. One that would have mechanical transparency and made the player think about his decisions at the same. I'm not quite sure how this could be accomplished while keeping the costs down and the writing to Obsidian's usual standards though.
  4. I disagree, making currency harder to obtain seems like a much more sensible solution to the money abundance problem. Lowering the income curve significantly would keep things interesting during the whole game and not just the first half or so money wise. Instead of being able to spendthrift so much that you need some kind of artificial hole to sink all your money into you should be struggling to keep your equipment up to snuff even towards the endgame. When you're not able to afford all of the best equipment in the game there are interesting choices to be made and it makes the hunt for gold more rewarding. Making things harder to sell in general would be a good thing. After defeating a gang of bandits you could have gained a small amount of rare metals and minerals but all their equipment would only be useful for crafting or switching to it if what you had were worse. The demand for shoddy second rate leather armours with holes through them and rusty dull blades shouldn't be very substantial. Items of better quality on the other hand would be hard to get rid off since there are so few potential buyers around and plenty of skilled craftsmen that you would have to compete with.
  5. There are many ways to be creative with the journal, but I would prefer one where the player takes an active role. Geneforge did this in an interesting way, quests you got were automatically jotted down for you, but only the basic task and not anything surrounding it. Instead of being spoon-feed each and every step of a quest you had to manually write down important parts of conversations you've had yourself. Let me make up an example to better illustrate what this does in practice. A farmer is missing one of his hens and wants you to find it for him, you now have "Find hen for farmer x" among your quests. Next you speak to another farmer and he mentions in passing that he saw an suspicious individual carrying a hen heading towards the east, now in many games this would have updated your quest entry but this is not the case here. The quest entry doesn't change, but if you were attentive and read what he said you now have written down the relevant information in your journal for future reference and are hopefully one step closer to finishing the quest.
  6. Let me get this straight, you do not want an in depth written "romance" since it would compromise your imagined character and you keep championing shallow relationships that only consists of a couple of conversations because it leaves a lot of things left to the imagination. Lastly you must feel rather strongly about this to keep making these lengthy posts advocating it. You didn't even answer his question, why not just imagine the whole thing yourself? Write a line or two about it in the character's bio and you're all set, right? Because that's what you usually do anyway, you said so yourself.
  7. Could you please change the blue to some other colour, it's currently unreadable. Edit: Thanks.
  8. A great many TB games only use turns when the player is engaged in combat and are in real-time when not, it's not something exclusive to RTwP. Personally I would prefer a phase based combat system as I find it the most interesting kind, but since it is Obsidian that are developing this and their strong suite has never been combat I'd be happy with RTwP since the battles are over relatively quickly with it.
  9. The difference between jarpie's characters and yours is that yours are completely disconnected from the game. If neither the gameworld or other players/npcs react to your PC's actions/traits/etc they might as well not exist.
  10. No, I don't think so. But that isn't accurate anyway. Let me fix that for you. Male Warrior Character: Female Warrior Character: Monk Character:
  11. Could you expand on that? A food mechanic would mean that food either heals you when you eat it or you have a "hunger" meter or something. A food role-playing aspect means that you may get periodic quests pertaining to "find some food" or "running low on supplies"--it's not a quantitative thing. I do know what it means, I should have been more specific in my wording. I was wondering what you wanted role-playing wise. Should quests regarding food be timed due to the nature of it? How would you make it different than your standard fed-ex quest if not? Should food be treated just like any other item or should they be limited to unique quest items? How do you stop food from being an junk item if you do not limit it to quests?
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