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paz12

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About paz12

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  1. Yes, currently it's overkill to go with a custom minmax group. It's not required. That's why the Endless Path is such a great idea. Had some fun and difficult battles there today.
  2. After patch: Same bug. I delivered the package, talked to Verzano, decided to defend him. Fought the killer commando. Verzano survived. Quest bugged: Verzano now tells me to deliver the package (which I already did). Seems like he HAS to die no matter what. Edit: The fight is also bugged in many ways: At the start of the fight I retreated to another room. I could hear the fighting in the other room. When I entered that room again to check whether or not Verzano had died, I realized that he was regenerating health ... The Doemonels were unable to kill him. (I didn't do anything. I basically just ran away, trying to wait for Verzano to die.) Edit2: I let Verzano die during the fight, killed the Doemenels, but Pellagina was nowhere to be found. Cannot recruit her. So tried again: I reloaded the autosave BEFORE ALL DIALOGS, just when entering the building after delivering the package. Then I played the whole scene again, chosing exactly the same dialog options. The fight started, I won, Verzano survived. Then I waited for about 10 seconds. *pling* Quest updated. There might be two possible causes for this bug: 1) Clicking on Verzano immediately after the fight, ie. before the quest updates. 2) Loading a manual save "inbetween". When I encountered the bug, I did both. I clicked on Verzano immediately after the fight, and I loaded a save from the start of the fight (a save from after the dialog, when the red circles appear at start of combat).
  3. I was under the impression that Thaos was directly responsible for Waidwen's behaviour. What if Waidwen was possessed by Thaos? This makes a lot of sense, because Thaos, as he brags in the end, has a habit of throwing entire nations into turmoil.
  4. I don't think I've seen something like this in a game for a while: The story has two layers: Surface world: Raedric, Defiance bay, the politics of a country and its recent history 2nd layer: The powers behind this country's fate. PoE manages to tell the story of a country in turmoil. The strong point of the story becomes obvious in Defiance Bay: There are three factions there: 1) Animancers 2) Knights 3) The Dozens In my playthrough, I ended (killed) the Knights for their plans to construct soul powered golems. I also killed the Dozens because they were involved in the slaughtering of innocent people after the war with Waidwin (Eothas). I also made animancy take the blame for the Hollowborn situation. Because they came across as dangerous and utterly incompetent on top of that. Why did I choose to oppose these groups? Because they did not have a clue. They were fighting each other. And they did not seem to be able to solve the crisis. Maybe I am wrong, but the story doesn't seem to present any reasons why you should help any of those camps. They seemed absolutely unfit to solve the crisis. As a watcher, I wasn't interested in using souls or their power. I wasn't interested in activating ancient machines, continuing any crusades, or strengthening the army. I was only interested in restoring the usual order of things. Which (during my playthrough) lead to a situation where I felt like leaving the city ASAP, because it seemed to be filled with lunatics. Of course they did not really behave like lunatics. They were just completely ignorant... PoE creates in interesting gap between the real world with its politics and factions, and the layer underneath it. The country is built on the ruins of an ancient civilisation, but the current inhabitants of that country have a very limited knowledge of the gods and powers that control their fate. They are just the surface layer, unable to touch or even see the powers that are controlling their fate. The real meat of the story, and the real rulers of their world, are underneath: Leaden Key, Adra Stones, and the Gods and devices of an ancient civilization. Hopefully the story will be continued. It was fun to save the world without the world knowing it.
  5. Because something that is not relevant needs to be ignored. Because changing the irrelevant makes it relevant. Taking offense in that poem serves only one purpose: Generating clicks (attention) for people who are unable to generate attention by doing anything relevant. Ignoring them is the right thing. Force them to do/say/be something relevant.
  6. Does upgrading the stronghold (laboratory, artificer, etc) have any effect on enchanting items?
  7. Yes, you use a disable or interrupt (or an escape spell, clone potion, etc). There are ways to leave a battle, no need for easy mode to hold our hands. False. Once aggroed, it's you or the bear. No escape. No indication to the player that you need to level up a bit before fighting it, yet there is a quest telling you to go in the cave. Game tells me to do something then punishes me for doing it. If the game tells you to jump from a bridge, are you going to do it? Feedback like this shows that most games have degenerated into something that comes with its own walkthrough built-in.
  8. I get your point. Although in my opinion not having the level information does actually add something to my playing experience. What does it add? It keeps me in the game world. When the game starts, I don't know anything about the land or its creatures. In the first couple of minutes I learn about spiders, then wolves. There's a bandit camp nearby. There's a bear cave. This first map exemplifies what I like about this game. Spiders can be beaten easily. Bandits are tricky. Bear is impossible at the start. All on the same map. Which is the only map that can be reached. When I died it wasn't because I was on the "wrong" map. It was because I was a level 1 adventurer who was stupid and a noob and didn't have a clue. What did I learn from this map? I learned that the world is dangerous. I learned this by dying in-game, not by looking at a number. After the first map I did accept the possibility to encounter something that is actually stronger than my party. This created suspense. What does this lead to? In my case, I read the monster descriptions in the 'pedia. I also did not dare to engage some scary looking creature, because I was semi-sure I'd get my ass kicked. When I fought that creature later, it was laughably weak. I also engaged a group of guys that I took for some generic, weak ass bandits. Turned out they were not and I burned through all my spells in one unexpected show of power. Suprises, suspense, triumph and fear would not have been possible if there was a level number. I'd know beforehand whether or not I am supposed to win this fight. On my 2nd playthrough I will know that spiders are weak to crushing damage and fire. I'll know that this group is dangerous and that group is not. I can focus on efficiency as opposed to exploration. To put it short: Having numbers takes away exploration and adventure. I like this on my first playthrough. Your logic is very flawed. The post you are arguing against describes exactly what you claim to want. I'm very confused about your position on this topic. Providing information about the difficulty of a mob is in-game information that your characters would get from evaluating a potential enemy. That is in-game information. Having to fight something, find out it kills you, and then reload is NOT keeping things "in the game world". Incorrect. You, as a player, may have learned this, but your character certainly did not. You have to reload to a time prior to when your character found this information out (i.e. before the fight). This is NOT keeping things "in the game world" as you claim to like. This is exactly the opposite of that. Having said that, it would be easy enough to implement the feature as optional, so why not suggest that instead of all the people saying "omg no I don't want this"? It's the difference between PnP roleplaying and CRPG. You don't reload anything in PnP. You either play like a cowardly chicken, or you will simply die and roll a new character, if you did not make sure to consider all availble options before fighting this or that monster. In a PnP game, I would never fight anyone on the first map. It's the wilderness. I am alone. I am on my way to the next city. Why would I want to fight random bandits 3 or 4 vs 1? But here I can reload, so I might as well try my luck. (Which is why I said that I was dying like a stupid, lvl 1 adventurer nub. It's a really stupid idea to consider fighting anything on that map.) If you take a CRPG seriously, that means if you consider it to be a role playing game, you'd have to adjust the playstyle and be very, very cautious. Giving away the level (or HP) of the monsters is information that is kept away from the players in role playing games. The GM won't tell you: you are facing a lvl 5 troll with 5d6 HP. He'll tell you: You are facing a troll. It's everybody's guess how strong that thing actually is in comparison to your party. You are right in saying that more information is needed about the monsters though. Because during the 1st playthrough I didn't have any idea how strong a shadow of phantom might be, and there was nothing that could tell me. No books, no characters, no nothing. However: If you take your time and play PoE on normal difficulty with expert mode "on", you will get something that simply isn't offered by games that give away level information (or colour coded mob names). Adventure. Because then you will try to avoid fights at all costs, meaning you will sneak through the wilderness, beelining towards the next quest objective, without trying to farm XP from monsters that you know to be weaker than your party. I am pretty sure PoE can be played without reloading if approached in a role playing way. That means: Sneak to Gilded Vale. Talk to everyone. Pick up 2 companions. Sneak south. Pick up 3rd companion. Sneak East, pick up 4th companion. Return to map north of Gilded Vale. Kill four bandits and a bear. You don't need level information or reloading to accomplish this. This playstyle actually works in PoE. Which is probably one of the game's greatest achievement. Apart from that: Role playing games work best, when the party knows that they are seriously underleveled. Because that's where exploring the game world starts, as opposed to going on a killing spree. But I get your point. Having level information has it's advantages. It's helpful information. But it has its dangers. And those outweigh the benefits, in my opinion.
  9. In my playthrough, I killed all three groups. I didn't want to help any of those crooks. Lady Webb congratulated me on that and said something about a "rare show of incompetence", but sent me to attend the hearing nevertheless. Killing all three groups + Lady Webb leads to madness and game over btw, which is great.
  10. IMO there are two things missing from the autopause settings menu. 1) Pause when action completed (character has no orders) 2) Pause when action cancelled/interrupted (character has no orders) It can be very hard to figure out how long it will take to simply drink a potion. It can also be very hard to figure out how long it will take to cast this spell / activate that ability. I think it would be a good idea to add before mentioned 2 options to the game. Anyone feeling the same?
  11. Zwei commits weiter ist es bereits korrigiert Schlüssel habe ich auch gesehen. Ich denke aber das ist sein Name und beabsichtigt. Black Hound finde ich in der deutschen Übersetzung gar nicht. Das _x000D_ ist ein Fehler, den Excel beim Importieren von Texten mit Zeilenumbruch produziert, wenn man keine Ahnung hat und/oder nicht aufpasst.
  12. Same here. THere's also a thread in the bugs forum about this. CUrrently putting my playthrough on a halt until the bugs are solved. Probably off to play BG1 now :D
  13. I get your point. Although in my opinion not having the level information does actually add something to my playing experience. What does it add? It keeps me in the game world. When the game starts, I don't know anything about the land or its creatures. In the first couple of minutes I learn about spiders, then wolves. There's a bandit camp nearby. There's a bear cave. This first map exemplifies what I like about this game. Spiders can be beaten easily. Bandits are tricky. Bear is impossible at the start. All on the same map. Which is the only map that can be reached. When I died it wasn't because I was on the "wrong" map. It was because I was a level 1 adventurer who was stupid and a noob and didn't have a clue. What did I learn from this map? I learned that the world is dangerous. I learned this by dying in-game, not by looking at a number. After the first map I did accept the possibility to encounter something that is actually stronger than my party. This created suspense. What does this lead to? In my case, I read the monster descriptions in the 'pedia. I also did not dare to engage some scary looking creature, because I was semi-sure I'd get my ass kicked. When I fought that creature later, it was laughably weak. I also engaged a group of guys that I took for some generic, weak ass bandits. Turned out they were not and I burned through all my spells in one unexpected show of power. Suprises, suspense, triumph and fear would not have been possible if there was a level number. I'd know beforehand whether or not I am supposed to win this fight. On my 2nd playthrough I will know that spiders are weak to crushing damage and fire. I'll know that this group is dangerous and that group is not. I can focus on efficiency as opposed to exploration. To put it short: Having numbers takes away exploration and adventure. I like this on my first playthrough.
  14. It's called evolution: amoeba enhanced amoeba very much so enhanced amoeba This all leads to the pinnacle of creation: mankind ultima I-V Diablo 1-3 WoW This all leads to the pinnacle of creation: cow clicker (At least from the PR&investment department's point of view)
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