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Clawdius_Talonious

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About Clawdius_Talonious

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  1. If there are these sorts of animations we haven't seen them, but I don't believe there are kill cam animations for your player. There's an argument to be made about kill cams in e.g. Skyrim literally robbing you of kills by messing with the speed things happen and so the camera pauses and then shows you... your arrow miss. Fallout 3 had more of this problem, and while Fallout 4 avoids this by magicking a bullet into existence between you and the target and watching the bullet hit the enemy (avoiding the projectile hitting banisters, guard rails etc.) there are... a fair amount of issues that would have to be ironed out with this system. The current system seems to teleport your allies into positions where they can definitely hit enemies, and then play their animation. There's also the fact that they're not giving third person camera access to the player at any time, so there is ample reason to believe that they won't even animate a variety of player actions in a third person sense. There may be standardized canned animations for any humanoid that do apply to the character's third person model, but they won't be given the kind of QA and polish they would need for them to be the full focus of the entire game even for a few moments every now and then. It's not impossible that we could see these sorts of animations in the game by any means, but with a limited budget, cutting fluff like this is a good way to focus QA on unraveling bugs in the quest system and other things that are more important to the primary player loop than kill cam animations. The variety of weapons on offer is a blessing and a curse, in the sense that you limit what you can do in terms of universally applicable animations. This means that you'd need to have animations for various types and lengths of melee weapon, e.g. a bludgeon might be able to decapitate a foe but it wouldn't look the same as a bladed weapon, a two handed melee weapon would look different than one handed etc. Then you have ranged weapons, heavy ranged weapons will animate differently depending on how you hold them, are they underslung heavy weapons with a handle on top, a rifle you hold to your shoulder? Do they have a scope or iron sights? Then you have one handed ranged, pistols and such, which would benefit from animating vastly differently in situations the entire game pauses to focus the camera on you. Some of this can be reused for all human NPCs, some might not be able to be used as readily. Would it make sense for science weapons to animate the same as their equivalent counterparts? Do NPCs ever use the science weapons or just the player character? I don't think they would be playing this particular card close to their vest if it were in their hand, it would be a big flashy hollow display, which is perfect for marketing and demo reels. You get to show off all the flash and don't have to worry that you'll be giving up anything of substance in a game with a finite amount of story that you don't want to spoil when you can avoid doing so.
  2. If anyone at Obsidian was even aware of this as a possible thing that might happen, it was Feargus Urquhart, and he's not the most forthcoming boss. Just a week or so before the announcement Tim and Leonard were saying in interviews that they would be coming to Steam. The Steam store page was updated hours before the announcement, so it's probable that a lot of the people at Obsidian got wind of this the same way James Comey found out he was fired. I mean, it sucks they won't be on your favorite stores for a year, but Private Division wants to get every single dime they can out of this deal because they know The Outer Worlds and probably any DLC are the only time they'll even have access to this as a revenue stream. If a crazy number of people avoid the game, just because it's on the Epic store and Microsoft store and they don't like those stores (or can't access the M$ store for whatever reason) then it could readily affect things that I don't think people would really be happy about if they thought it through. Fewer, less complex DLCs, and a reduced likelihood of a sequel don't really seem like what we all want out of this IP. Microsoft has a crazy amount of money, as a publisher they've never really settled in to do things quite the way they seem to be handling InXile, NinjaTheory and Obsidian. It seems, to me without knowledge of behind the scenes info, like Microsoft may have embraced the idea of a more auteur theory based approach. In the past Microsoft acquired Bungie to make what was slated to be the first (or one of the first, not sure what the potential release schedule was vs Quake 3) multiplayer only PC FPS into a console exclusive. That said, when the companies parted ways 8 years later they did so in what seemed like an amicable manner, even if from what I gather they wouldn't continue to own their old IP. My point is, if you're not happy with Epic's store activities, I'd say if you're really wanting to play the game, get it from Microsoft. How many sales would it take to be the top selling PC game ever from the Microsoft store? It can't be a million, it's probably like a couple hundred thousand, but I have no idea whether you'd want to count "Candy Crush Saga" as a game. I certainly wouldn't call it a PC game, just because AFAIK it exists across a variety of mobile platforms as well. It should be easy to make The Outer Worlds the highest selling game from a Microsoft owned company at any rate. If you wait a year for the Steam release, barring some bizarre miracle, you'll barely be a blip on Microsoft's sales radar. If you want to do that, that's fine, but I'm not sure anything below hundreds of thousands of sales on Steam would even be a powerpoint slide presentation bullet point.
  3. What I find funny about all of this is, when Steam launched, I heard so many insane things about how bad Steam was and how anti-cosumer and just awful in every way Steam was, would forever be, and I was an idiot for preferring it to going into Gamestop and telling the employee what I wanted. They would stare at me like I had a second head, and then ask the second head if I wanted the game for one of the game consoles. Or, better, they would tell me that such a game did not exist. I would kindly tell them to look into their computer, they would snark off after they found it and I prepurchased it, and leave. Steam was met with not a small amount of pushback, Steam was pretty well loathed for years by many people who are now regular users. I mean, when Steam started their big push they had The Orange Box so I could not only play my games on Steam but also give a free copy to Half Life 2 to people since I had already owned it. The entire rigmarole was trotted out, what happens when their servers go offline permanently, what happens when the sky falls, what happens when we get hit by a gamma ray burst... like a software platform can deal with literally everything. I say more power to companies opting to go to the Epic Games store. Epic Games, while not the best storefront yet, is still in the stage where Steam routinely had the kinds of errors that made me avoid it for over a year until they gave me beta access to TF2. I don't like splitting up my library any more than anyone else, but the thing is, the Epic store being a storefront that other companies want to sell their titles on means that potentially even those morons in charge of companies that decided just their company alone was worthy of a storefront that barely works and has no effort put into it. So far Epic's storefront hasn't caused me any major problems (or any problems at all that I've noticed tbh) and their software WORKS. Meanwhile Bethesda got the "Boohoo they got mad at me for selling paid mods, this is your fault Steam!" affliction and rolled out Bethesda.net which is handily the worst piece of software for acquiring content that exists. Alt tab away from it and it pauses, because you WANT to watch that DL number get bigger. Shift tab into a browser window? It interpreted that as you backing out of the file you were looking at so now you just have to guess whether or not that file finished downloading. Lists of files being downloaded? What do you think this is? Some free software provided by modders(who BTW offered to currate Bethesda.net for free and were rejected)!? My point is that the Epic games storefront isn't offensive, it's at worst a bit bland and they could probably use more servers to avoid congestion at peak hours, in other words the kind of growing pains every single storefront encounters. To me all of this is just as laughable as everyone calling this an Epic exclusive when it has said in every single article that it is also going to be available at the Microsoft store as well as on M$' rival console. Exclusivity sure has changed since my day when it meant that you could only acquire the item in one location.
  4. I'll buy it on the Epic store, no problem. Epic gave me a number of games, and will likely be doing so for some time to come. The split for UE4 games is a lot better for Obsidian and the more money Obsidian makes from this the better potential for a sequel. Obsidian bringing in 23% more on every sale is huge for a company like Obsidian that has previously operated with thin margins. The Outer Worlds may have a potential user base higher than something like Pillars/Deadfire but even so the more of my money that Obsidian gets the better. I'd prefer it if I had it in my Steam library but I won't wait a year for that. At the end of the day, I'm an Obsidian fan, not a store fan (just someone with a huge Steam library) and I'll follow Obsidian's decisions as long as they don't e.g. become a M$ store exclusive which would be off-putting. I love Obsidian's work and the more money they get from each sale, the fewer sales they need to secure a sequel. Ipso facto: I'm pro-anything-that-gets-a-sequel to The Outer Worlds as that universe is something I'm really interested. Plus their DLCs may be able to have more resources spent on them, and have an easier time recouping the outlay and -at least- breaking even. I hope the DLC is amazing and sells like hotcakes, but Obsidian's luck with e.g. the White March, well that didn't recoup the costs from what I understand so I'm fine with anything that benefits Obsidian (even if it's benefiting Microsoft, Obsidian's income from sales being higher makes them look better for M$ as a new acquisition.
  5. A 980 might not be enough if it was a VR title, but for pancake games, it's going to depend on a couple of things. One, do you want to play the game in 4k? Resolution makes a huge difference in performance, to the point where a friend started to get snippy with me when I told him I got 30fps in Metro 2033 benchmarks despite my having a card that was a generation older than his. I ran at 1360x768 and he was running at IIRC 1600x1050 and that's a substantial enough difference that we both pulled about 30fps in the benchmarks. The difference from 1080p to 4k resolution is 4X as much to render. So, regarding your question, what kind of FPS do you need to get out of this and at what resolution? That same friend who was adamant that it was impossible I was getting 30fps in Metro began to believe that he could readily identify the difference between 90fps and 144 fps, so these days I'm sure he'd be very unhappy with the way a 980 performed in any modern game. I myself have tended to be happy with smooth performance, never dipping below 30fps is fine in 2D for me in many cases, as long as there isn't awful screen tearing to the point that I want to turn into a character from the end of Event Horizon I'm usually alright with graphics performance and will benefit more from having higher settings like bettter AA than I will from getting a solid 60fps, not that I can't tell the difference it's just that I don't really care. Since I've gotten into the VR community I've come to realize that what is acceptable with a monitor strapped to your face is very different, so if this was a VR title you'd need a solid 90fps with no dips below 60 and as few dips below 90 as possible so a 980 wouldn't be likely to pull that off with anything modern that wasn't using very stylized graphics and was performance oriented. For a flat game though, it's really all about your own personal preferences. If you've got to have a resolution above 1080p with all the bells and whistles the answer might be a newer card will help ensure that you don't end up having a disappointing experience. How do you feel about other UE4 titles? If for instance, Hellblade Senua's Sacrifice runs great at your preferred resolution and max settings you'll probably be fine, or will at least have a better idea of what to expect regarding performance. The 9 series cards were really the same chipset as the 7 series cards, but the huge performance gains listed prior to the 10 series launching are like the "6X performance increase* ** ***" from the 10 series to the 20 series, they exist almost entirely on paper. The real world performance is generally hampered by the fact that games want to e.g. run on AMD hardware too, so while you would see significant performance improvements at 4k resolution and max settings jumping from a 980 to a 2080 or something brand new, most people just don't need that kind of performance (or have the cash to drop on such an enthusiast tier bleeding-edge graphics card for that matter.) You're probably going to be okay if all you want is to run the game, but there are a lot of unanswered questions here, even your i7 and 16gb of RAM is a huge variable, although not one I feel the need to bring up so much given that the last several years of CPU improvements have improved the hell out of performance-per-watt but for a desktop gaming PC we've had a plateau in performance that has lasted longer than these things used to last. At the end of the day a lot of things depend on Obsidian, and how much optimization they do. Their priority may well be on game affecting bugs and crashes and such, so the game might not launch in a super optimized state (also the game might have AMD optimization focus even if they do optimize the hell out of it, for console purposes since these days those are all low end AMD APUs). Not even an Obsidian employee could tell you exactly what the game would get in average FPS at launch on a test rig with a 980 at this point (and real world rigs have so much more potential for weirdness that's just impossible to QA so no one can really tell anyone what kind of performance they'll get out of a title beyond what they would consider a reasonable margin of error), and if they could they almost certainly wouldn't. That said, it's not unreasonable to try and extrapolate and buying something like Hellblade Senua's Sacrifice could easily give you an idea of what a newer UE4 title does with your rig performance wise. I would say that at the price point Ninja Theory asked for that title it is an affordable way to gauge what you might anticipate from The Outer Worlds, at least in my opinion, but YMMV. TL;DR: Try a new UE4 title and see what that does for you, it may be able to give you some idea what you can anticipate from The Outer Worlds. Even if you had told us the resolution you're aiming for, your Frames-Per-Second preferences etc. it'd be a shot in the dark trying to guess what you'll think of how your rig performs with a game that isn't even out yet.
  6. https://youtu.be/I9ptiP6SOSQ?t=960 for anyone interested in hearing it straight from the source.
  7. August is mid q3 and a delay into even December just makes it a slip into Q4, Tons of these kinds of early leaked street dates leaked right out of someone's less pleasant orifices rather than any concrete source. That said, the Game Informer push could support a Q3 launch date but Obsidian would probably rather wait and get as much as they can to be perfect out of the gate as possible. MS and T2/PD both have skin in this game so a major QA push from one and a ton of advertising from the other wouldn't be unreasonable. I think the real question is when they will announce an official date, and even as recently as Pillars 2 Obsidian needed more time and took it. If Obsidian's first launch post MS acquisition and Private Division's biggest pc game to date afaik releases buggy af that would be very bad. Especially for me, because I want to spend a lot of money on Outer Worlds games in the coming millenia. All hail Spacer's Choice's right to 7 nonconsecutive minutes of leisure time per cycle!
  8. I will, I love Obsidian's work and while I haven't always loved every story beat of every game, the only Obsidian game I didn't buy was Dungeon Siege 3. I have the money to buy a collectors edition but I will probably just get a version off of Steam. I am really interested in the potential for expansion sized dlcs as well, the hard part will be not playing the game from start to finish 7 or 8 times before the dlcs come out.
  9. AFAIK there aren't any announced official plans for VR support. If you're able to stomach VR shooters, and play on PC, then you'll pretty much definitely be able to use VorpX to play in VR. That said, there will probably be some community effort put into something with a bit more to it than just playing an Unreal based shooter in VorpX. Given how many people have used UE4 for their own projects, this has the potential to become a fairly robust offering in time. Obsidian and Private Division have been clear that their budget for the game is limited and they are focusing what they spend it on, making sure the core game is as good as they can make it. This almost definitely means that there won't be official VR support for The Outer Worlds at launch, it takes a ton of work to really make VR elements feel right and they very likely don't have anything to spare for this sort of niche improvement. The things that tighten a shooter's gameplay and improve the feel of combat in pancake games don't necessarily contribute to those things feeling right in VR, so exactly how much work it may take to make the game have a proper risk/reward balance and e.g. make sure you don't have phobias/flaws that don't affect you in VR and equate to free perks (for ease of example let's say, if there was a flaw that slowed your run speed and a VR version lets you teleport thereby negating run speed modifiers entirely) or what have you. Now, how much of the game is 'future proofed' in regards to VR and a potential VR adaptation in the future is anyone's guess, but when the game comes out I'm sure a lot of VR communities will be interested in seeing just what they can do with it.
  10. By default number of flaws you can accept depends on difficulty setting, 5 on the hardest, 4 on hard, 3 on normal and I guess 3 on the easiest difficulty? I don't think they mentioned that one when discussing number of flaws specifically. That said I'm sure one of the first mods will be a mod to let you be more flawed or more flawed on lower difficulties.
  11. Personally I'm in favor of areas constructed with what would have been adequate signage at some point, and landmarks and the like with logical clues in logical places. Waiting for a pizza was no sure thing pre-GPS, but much of the time at most a paper map, and reasonable knowledge of the town was able to guide a pizza straight to people's front doors. People can be reasonably expected to follow certain environmental clues, and overall that kind of design is good for everyone from the person who got momentarily turned around to immediately recognize "No, I'm not heading toward the yellow tower" or what have you and correct that kind of mistake. In PoE2:Deadfire I set sail toward Neketaka after the first island in the game with very limited knowledge about the surroundings, but I gathered up a number of heads inside sacks. Don't know how I knew they had bounties, or that someone would want these heads. Mind you, Obsidian didn't want people backtracking or feeling forced to backtrack, they didn't want there to be a variable "how hard this area is with this bounty or without it" or any other number of potential variables so they drop their head quest item. It's not weirder than when I crack open Kellogg's head in Fallout 4 and take part of his brain (is the Sole Survivor constantly cracking open skulls to check for a synth component?) for sure, but it's still a little weird. To me, it would have been a nice bit of setup and payoff to have the mayor give the Watcher a miracle of animancy, a tablet that gives sensory clues to help watchers track down people in the Deadfire with a bounty on their head. Then at least I'd have had a reason for cutting off heads of people I just stumbled across in the wilderness and presumably the tablet would then give you an idea who to bring your new trophy to before it starts stinking up the joint, the only change this would make to the bounty system in Deadfire would be to make it where you could complete bounties in any order. My point is that Obsidian designs their content with uniformity of experience in mind, they didn't want you to have to backtrack if you had killed them, or have an easier time of it when an encounter wasn't there or was replaced with generic NPCs, or get double the loot when you killed generic NPCs and went back for a bounty, etc. etc. etc. These problems all were uniformly fixed with the "let there be heads" solution, even if it isn't ideal for the logic of some situations. "You want me to kill who? Let me look in my bag of heads. Him? Yeah he's here, here you go? And who now? Ohhh, cool, yeah he's here too, here. She's in here already, there you are. That's it? We're done here? Cool you have a good one too." like what kind of impression would that make on someone? It's one thing for a sea captain to sail around from island to island coming back with what were clearly the clothes of a bunch of people who lived on that island, no one pays you to ask questions. But when the hold starts smelling like your captain's decapitated head collection, everyone is going to regret it. I actually like the idea in New Vegas that you needed to preserve head integrity (although I don't think they ever rot or anything if you do happen to collect heads before having ever realized this was a quest, and maybe a dog brain for another quest because why not?) so there were times when I certainly wasn't awarded full payment for those heads. If designing with things that are easy to navigate by virtue of them being designed to be easy to navigate (not necessarily by them but a city planner or someone making sure their space station is up to ... vacuum code - fire code BUT IN SPACE!) or whatever that's a better design philosophy than "Just build cool looking stuff" because in real life form over function will drive people mental. I mean, say what you will about cities and buildings, they're pretty often laid out in a way that's easy to grasp. Personally what I would love to see them do is play with those norms a bit. Seeing a lot of Teal around town? You're in Auntie Cleo's turf, you might not want to look like you're in favor of some other corp if you want things to stay calm. If you've taught the player at the end of The Outer Worlds what Auntie Cleo's and Spacer's Choiceâ„¢ graffifti look like by the end of the game, congratulations, you could well see that scrawled in public for the rest of your life. TL;DR: I'm in favor of design that is easy to navigate by descriptions and landmarks, even if a navigation system in future tech is absolutely logical. I feel like Obsidian already likes to incorporate aesthetic and thematic changes in their level design, so we'll see.
  12. I always go to her before I mess with him, get her to promise to pay ME for helping her find him, and then I can rescue him without being on the hook for money he never had. 4k is like a decent magic item early game, a pretty decent pair of boots or gloves or something not super-common. I'm usually without that much liquidity early game anyway, but the first time I got him first and then went to her and she wanted me to pay her because I rescued a stranger and accepted him onto my crew I was baffled. "Look, if you like the old guy so much, why don't I just give him to you? He can't navigate worth a damn at night anyway, he's nightblind in one eye and can't see out of the other.
  13. I mean, they've already displayed that they'll be selling via Steam and have a Steam store page and so on. That said, Epic Games' storefront would logically be giving Obsidian a larger slice of the pie once that's an option. Steam's 70% isn't a bad cut, but since it uses UE4 and the Epic Games storefront takes a smaller cut from sales -and- doesn't charge the normal slice for using their engine as far as I understand it... I guess Epic Games' storefront would be the way to make sure the most money makes it into Obsidian/Private Division's hands.
  14. I wouldn't say interest in P:K dried up exactly so much as cooled off, personally I've told people with interest in it to keep it on the shelf, but I bought their Season Pass and really do hope Owlcat made enough that they come out with sequels and the like. It's both a good thing (for longevity) and bad thing (for early sales figures) that these kinds of RPGs not only don't age quite like other products but could be said to improve with age. Of course, Owlcat's first effort was bug riddled, but it was Owlcat's first rodeo. They did their eight seconds, didn't get kicked in the head, and I reckon seein' them come back for another in the future would appeal to me just fine. I hope that Owlcat did enough business that they can stay together as a company, of all the RPGs from first time companies that I've backed on Kickstarter despite the state it shipped in I feel like it was in a place where it -could- be improved to the point that it's considered a classic to fans of the genre. I'm hoping Owlcat gets that chance, because I feel like they deserve it. Obsidian's continued existence as a discrete entity operated by Microsoft is assured for a time at least, it's not EA so it's not a countdown to extinction. P:K may have been Owlcat's chance and if they managed to under-perform enough that they don't get another one that would be a real shame.
  15. I mean, we've got their Fig investor returns, we don't have access to Obsidian financials to see exactly how much of their own money was put up vs how much of the budget was purely from crowdfunding (a ton of crowd funded things use the definite interest of a few thousand to project sales figures and get more money from investors.) I mean short of Obsidian coming out and saying "We had 500,000 sales of Deadfire in 2018" I'm not sure what else we would see. We're kind of piecing things together from disparate facts. Steam has officially said that developers can release Steam numbers if they want (AFAIK we're not aware of anyone receiving any guff from Steam prior to this if they had discussed sales figures, but it's still an official seal of approval.) Still, companies aren't likely to necessarily discuss these kinds of financial details unless they're really really good or really really bad. If you extrapolate 200,000 sales at 60 dollars it's still 8.4 million in revenue for Obsidian, it's just that we don't know what the break even point was for Deadfire. We have reason to imagine that Obsidian didn't wildly hype themselves up for sales of Deadfire after The White March (As I understand it) didn't recoup development costs. I'm sure they were still disappointed, but how disappointed they were is unlikely to be answered officially. TL;DR: Long answer yes with an if, short answer no with a but.
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