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Mikey Dowling

New screenshots! The Engwithan Empire (Part 1)

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Hey all, with now 13 days left until Pillars of Eternity launches, we have two new screenshots for you! Enjoy the awesomeness of the Engwithan empire!

 

Little is known about the long-lost Engwithan empire or its culture. Called the "Builders" by the tribes of Eir Glanfath, the Engwithans are believed to have created strange, elaborate structures over decades using shaped pillars of living adra to support the stone. Their language is barely understood by even the most well-read scholars, leaving many details of their society lost to the ages and hopelessly mired in rumor, folklore, and blatant lies.

 

11025935_10152755383076593_6564467140725

11025935_10152755383076593_6564467140725poe-engwithan-04.jpg

 

poe-engwithan-03.jpg

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I wish I knew why picture's always look 500x better on my phone than they do on my monitor. Which makes me wonder how the game looks on a retina display...?

Maybe your monitor just sucks?


35167v4.jpg

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I wish I knew why picture's always look 500x better on my phone than they do on my monitor.

 

Cuz higher pixel density.

 

Wish granted.

 

 

Which makes me wonder how the game looks on a retina display...?

 

You'll have to translate that from Apple marketing speak to real-world resolution for me. :biggrin:

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Apple displays that have a high pixel density, typically twice more than classic displays.

For example on my MBP Retina 13", my resolution is virtually 1280x800 but is actually 2560x1600 (which is 1280*2 x 800*2).

 

To my knowledge the only "mainstream" computer displays that have a higher density are 4K (and soon 8K) displays.

Edited by Rumsteak

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Apple displays that have a high pixel density, typically twice more than classic displays.

For example on my MBP Retina 13", my resolution is virtually 1280x800 but is actually 2560x1600 (which is 1280*2 x 800*2).

 

To my knowledge the only "mainstream" computer displays that have a higher density are 4K (and soon 8K) displays.

 

Pixel density is screen size combined with resolution. Your 13" MBP at native res has higher density than a 24" 4K.

 

Whether you'd actually want to play games at native res is a different story. Tiny UI elements and much GPU pain.

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Hey all, with now 13 days left until Pillars of Eternity launches, we have two new screenshots for you! Enjoy the awesomeness of the Engwithan empire!

 

Little is known about the long-lost Engwithan empire or its culture. Called the "Builders" by the tribes of Eir Glanfath, the Engwithans are believed to have created strange, elaborate structures over decades using shaped pillars of living adra to support the stone. Their language is barely understood by even the most well-read scholars, leaving many details of their society lost to the ages and hopelessly mired in rumor, folklore, and blatant lies.

 

 

11025935_10152755383076593_6564467140725

 

 

So, I'm going to assume that these guys are our Ancient Race That Ties Heavily Into The Plot given that they are an ancient race and

the machine bares a striking resemblance to the one that we saw very early on in previews.

 

Edited by Bryy

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@Flow You're right, current 4K and 8K monitors are not densest than Retina ones. I'm quite surprised then that Apple still has the densest mainstream computer displays. It's been 3 years since the first Retina macbook.

 

To go back to Falkon's question, PoE looks good on my MBP but I obviously don't have the graphic capability to play on native Retina res, so it looks as good as any other crappy laptop!

Edited by Rumsteak

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Apple displays that have a high pixel density, typically twice more than classic displays.

For example on my MBP Retina 13", my resolution is virtually 1280x800 but is actually 2560x1600 (which is 1280*2 x 800*2).

 

To my knowledge the only "mainstream" computer displays that have a higher density are 4K (and soon 8K) displays.

 

the Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro range has 3200x1800 resolution on a 13.3" screen.

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I won't be happy until there are 7 million pixels-per-millimeter of screen. Only when I need bionic eyes to see even 1% of the detail will I be satisfied with my graphics. u_u...

 

Love the screens, though, :). In playing the beta, I just keep stopping and thinking "WOW, the environments are SO detailed!" It's really hard to believe it's all just 2D in a lot of places, just looking at it.

Edited by Lephys

Should we not start with some Ipelagos, or at least some Greater Ipelagos, before tackling a named Arch Ipelago? 6_u

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@Flow You're right, current 4K and 8K monitors are not densest than Retina ones. I'm quite surprised then that Apple still has the densest mainstream computer displays. It's been 3 years since the first Retina macbook.

 

That's actually not very surprising at all because Windows doesn't scale well with higher resolutions than 1080p. Win10 will maybe change that but current Windows versions were never really made for high resolutions.


35167v4.jpg

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