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Nefastus

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About Nefastus

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  1. Definitely not an expert, but for a company like Oblivion who is probably not teetering on the brink financially and, would it matter? If it's treated as front-loaded taxable income, then wouldn't the production debits in the following fiscal year would be deducted and they would save in taxes in the second year about what they lost the first?
  2. That's a fair opinion, but I doubt the inclusion of DRM 'allows' games to be made--it's a higher-level business decision that has to do with protecting subsequent IP rights. I'm sure there's licensing to use extant DRM systems and different other costs, like online registration and activation systems that require server maintenance. Not to mention that there is a HUGE variety of DRM and some forms are far more insidious than others; I am not against DRM per se, but I'm not touching SecuROM with a---any length of pole. I tolerate online activation or registration for most things because tho
  3. I think that's basically what will happen. The devs have already said that how many additional people they bring over to work on the game will depend on fundraising, so more content will likely be the major outcome of overfunding.
  4. I don't know, I like the feeling towards the end of the game that your character has really come a long way from his humble beginnings. It really lends a sense of epicness to the character development to parallel that of the plot line. Maybe starting out struggling with mutant bunny rabbits at the beginning isn't too realistic, but it's important to maintain a sense of progression.
  5. They're going to hit the goal today most likely, so we may find out soon what the stretch goals would be.
  6. Because it's generally childish and gratuitous and thus comes off like fanservice--something that doesn't belong in an immersive role playing game in my opinion. I'd rather not Lollipop Chainsaw up my RPG's if I can avoid it. Violence can certainly reach gratuitous proportions too. I'm not saying it can't be done properly, though I admit I'd still rather not have my wife come in and see a a topless elf on my screen People aren't usually looking for nudity in games in order to contribute to the plot or ambiance of the game. Yes but still having it is good. Why so prudish abous
  7. Because it's generally childish and gratuitous and thus comes off like fanservice--something that doesn't belong in an immersive role playing game in my opinion. I'd rather not Lollipop Chainsaw up my RPG's if I can avoid it. Violence can certainly reach gratuitous proportions too. I'm not saying it can't be done properly, though I admit I'd still rather not have my wife come in and see a a topless elf on my screen People aren't usually looking for nudity in games in order to contribute to the plot or ambiance of the game.
  8. Yeah, better safe than sorry I think. I actually think some (especially older) JRPGs have done romance decently, however. Like JRPGs in general they were highly scripted, but effective ones were developed slowly and generally told by the small things with an element of real, albeit sometimes somewhat childish, humanity. Lots of room was left for the imagination of the player. I don't think I've ever felt emotionally invested in a WRPG romance and often it's just the opposite--I'm frequently annoyed and distracted by them.
  9. As long as it's done tastefully and realistically. Far too often in recent games those types of characters seem thrown in there for the sake of satisfying a political correctness quota rather than to organically flesh out the world and story line and as such they often stick out like a sore thumb and ruin the immersion of the game in my opinion. Do you have any examples...? Recent Bioware games come to mind. I seem to recall FO:NV doing a much better job of it, but my memory is a bit more hazy on that one.
  10. As long as it's done tastefully and realistically. Far too often in recent games those types of characters seem thrown in there for the sake of satisfying a political correctness quota rather than to organically flesh out the world and story line and as such they often stick out like a sore thumb and ruin the immersiveness of the game in my opinion.
  11. I'm in favor of whatever allows games like this to be made from an economic perspective. If that's DRM, that's a fairly small price to pay in my opinion.
  12. I'm glad to read that J.E. I was a lot less worried given Obsidian's generally solid track record, but so often when I hear about a "mature" game, that's code for developers wanting to shove as much gratuitous sex, drugs and violence into a game (or other media) as they can, which, while it may earn them an "MA" rating, often comes off as a pubescent dream rather than something actually mature in a literal sense. Heavy themes and the darker side of humanity are important avenues to explore in making a mature game. Stilleto greaves and chainmail thongs? Not so much.
  13. Agreed Tigranes. The restriction of on the fly customization and freedom that comes with class systems is more than counterbalanced by the ability to manage and develop a party. And the restriction in playstyle for a given class actually enables developers to make more interesting and unique, recruitable party-members. Personality and class often go hand and hand, and so it's hard to write a compelling, robust character that one player could play as a mage/thief and another as a barbarian.
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