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Gatt9

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About Gatt9

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  1. Option 1 is perfectly fine with me. Though I understand where ThreeSon is coming from as I have a collection of boxed games, is it possible to allow people to "Opt-in" to waiting so that people like Threeson interested in collecting are able to do so?
  2. Just because they've never been fully implemented doesn't make them a waste of time. Ideally, a pet should mimic their use in a PnP RPG. A Mage's familiar should be able to act as a scout, or the mage should be able to cast spells through it allowing him to sneak attack an unsuspecting group with a crow or cat. He should be able to use it to eavesdrop on a conversation, or send it to trigger an unreachable area, or obtain a hidden or unreachable item. A Ranger's pet should be able to sneak around an enemy and flank them when combat starts, the Ranger should be able to have his p
  3. The devs -- especially JE Sawyer -- have discussed degenerate gaming at length and on multiple occasions. They do want to make it a design goal to make a game that discourages it. I agree with them. Degenerate gaming is symptomatic of a design flaw. Why? Because degenerate tactics are not fun. They're repetitive, compulsive behavior. It's characterized by Skinner box mechanics: pull a lever and sometimes -- but not always -- a pellet comes out. It's quite easy to design a Skinner box that traps people. Some do it on purpose, in order to squeeze as much money out of you as possible (slot ma
  4. Probably don't have to worry about this one. I don't think any of us want another Hawke. you think wrongly then while you may be right that many people on this board will share this opinion, i for one, and i'm sure i'm not alone on this, think that few things can lift a game up as much as a well voiced main character the mentioned dragon age 2 (at least the female hawke, which i played), aquanox2 and alpha protocol are only some examples that profited massively from well voiced main characters on the contrary, i would say the missing voice acting for the main char in games like disho
  5. That is self-insertion, a characteristic of a LARPS, not an RPG where you have a defined character. Everything you've outlined right there is straight out description of LARPS. You don't take on a role of a character in an FPS (Or in a game like Skyrim), the object on the screen is an avatar for the Player. The Player's skill determines success or failure, the Character does not exist. This is once again, self insertion, LARPSing. An RPG has a defined character with his own intrinsic qualties that affect success/failure and his own personality. Within the confines of those personalit
  6. I'd argue that kiting is actually the end result of RT implementations. The AI has to compete with player input, game state checks, some degree of sound/graphics processing* for a slice of each second. Each unit representing it's own AI. AI requires complicated algorithms to achieve good results, complicated algorithms require time and horsepower. So the AI in any RT system is going to end up with deficiencies simply because it's severely resource limited. Tossing some more processors at it helps, but ultimately, you end up bound by the amount of processing that can occur in around 1 secon
  7. I'd argue that kiting is actually the end result of RT implementations. The AI has to compete with player input, game state checks, some degree of sound/graphics processing* for a slice of each second. Each unit representing it's own AI. AI requires complicated algorithms to achieve good results, complicated algorithms require time and horsepower. So the AI in any RT system is going to end up with deficiencies simply because it's severely resource limited. Tossing some more processors at it helps, but ultimately, you end up bound by the amount of processing that can occur in around 1 secon
  8. If you don't mind, I'll get back to you tomorrow morning on that. It's pretty late here and my brain is starting to go all fuzzy. I should probably preface the following with: I'm not saying Mana-based is bad, doesn't work, or that I don't enjoy games that use it. I would say that Yes, modern PnP RPG's do use it, since 5th edition D&D is reinstating it as the default magic system (With alternate rules if House wants a different system). I would also say that the premium editions of 1st edition, 2nd edition, and 3rd edition are selling incredibly well, with 2nd edition reported
  9. What does it add to the game? The purpose of the mechanic is to provide the party with time to prepare their strategy for area they're entering. Whether it's a rougue/assassin preparing poison, a Cleric communing with his/her god to prepare spells, or a mage preparing his spells and components. The mechanic is meant to model things that logically take a significant amount of time. The CRPG eliminates most of the reasons for resting, any form of alchemy is a good example, because in a CRPG it happens instantaneously in any place, without any preperation. The CRPG eliminates components, prep
  10. You're right of course. My experience in this forum, and every other forum, has been that things fall apart when you have a topic that pits arch-types of Gamers against one another. Console vs PC, LARPSer vs RPGer, 4th edition vs every other edition of D&D, Vancian vs Mana, at that point you have a battle of philosophies which generally does not end well as at that point the posters are no longer trying to discuss a topic so much as validate their preference(s) involved. IMO, and no offense to the mods, but perhaps those kinds of topics should get one stickied moderated thread and kill
  11. Not trying to argue with you, I just feel compelled to state that what you describe is the result of CRPG's only partially implementing the RPG systems. Vancian systems were recognized very early on in AD&D's life to have a key weakness: The Mage's spell limitations could impede design. It was very difficult to implement a frenetic adventure without eventually relegating the Wizard to a sling and boredom. Worse, Random Encounters during resting with a spent mage could end up lopsided if they were balanced for a full party but the Mage & Cleric were out of resources. The solutio
  12. The other side of the coin is that now the designer has to design around the fact that you have access to virtually every spell at any given time without restriction, which makes many challenges redundant at best. A wizard locked door or chest isn't much of a challenge when a caster can spam magic missles one minute, knocks the next, without any tradeoff. Prismatic Wall/Sphere is completely pointless when the mage will always have the right combination to breach it at all times. These situations exist and present challenges only because of the limited resources found in Vancian system
  13. Overly complex math for the sake of having overly complex math isn't good game design. At most, a check should be a d100 roll with a Character's skill/modifiers added to it compared to a difficulty value. Anything beyond that is excessive, and starting to enter Simulation territory by trying to model unneccessary (In this context) variables. Going beyond that, requiring players to have advanced understanding of probability and math starts limiting your potential sales very rapidly. Once you get out of basic algebra land you're going to start limiting your potential market because
  14. Wow, someone knows absolutely nothing about game design. I don't care what the exp model is, if the game is built correctly the devs WILL be able to predict your level and general party "strength" at any given point in it. It is in fact REQUiRED they be able to do this to make a balanced fun game. Even most "grind games" eventually simply give you little to no exp for your grinding and force you to move on with the story where, low and behold, you are really only slightly stronger than someone who just did the quests was. In the end your grinding availed you basically nothing. In games
  15. I disagree. I haven't seen "better" solutions. And while you are so keen to lump every proponent of objective-based-XP into the "want to sour my fun" category, allow me then to lump you into "I-want-it-all ego gamer" category. Balance must be mantained after all. It's what people are posting. All of these defenses of Objective based xp are trying to manage some subset of Player's behavior. "Someone might go back and kill the guards and get extra XP after finishing the quest", "Metagaming", etc, how is this relevant to the topic of the best way to handle xp such that all solut
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