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Dungeon Siege III DRM


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Since online-based DRM systems became common, asking about DRM of each new release I am interested in buying has become a necessity for me. So here comes the obligatory question: What type of DRM will be used with Dungeon Siege III?

 

I am particularly interested in whether it will be a disc check or if it will require some sort of online activity (activation, installation, phoning in, whatever else). I suspect it will be the latter, which will inevitably cause me to pass on the game, but I am hoping for the former, as the game looks like great fun.

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Digital Right Management. For example: If Dungeon Siege 3 will use Steamworks, you must create an online account during the installation (if you have not one account already). The game (Dungeon Siege 3) will be tied to the online account forever. Henceforward you can download the game as often as you like.

Edited by Bendu
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Digital Right Management. For example: If Dungeon Siege 3 will use Steamworks, you must create an online account during the installation (if you have not one account already). The game (Dungeon Siege 3) will be tied to the online account forever. Henceforward you can download the game as often as you like.

 

So why is that a problem? Because people can't download it illegaly? It doesn't really concern me because I plan on getting the PS3 version of the game.

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You can read the Steamworks brochure, if you want. It's somewhat relevant to a PS3 type as it's supposed to be 'ported' to PS3 at some point and with the PS3's own DRM being irretrievably compromised now chances are Sony will try and implement something similar at some point.

 

It won't be a problem for pirates in any case, Steam DRM hasn't stopped cracks since the game it was first used in, though it does stop pre day 1 piracy (as does every online verification system). There are a truly vast number of potential reasons to dislike it but most would probably cite it being a DRM- you're handing over access control of your software in this case to a 3rd party who can arbitrarily rescind it and whose software must be installed, running and monitoring your system if you want to play the game- as being the most significant.

 

Personally, while I have no problem with Steam itself- there are no circumstances under which I'd ever buy from them but I'm happy for others to if they want- I'd be ecstatic if Steamworks fell into a dimensional vortex and got retroactively deleted from reality.

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So why is that a problem? Because people can't download it illegaly? It doesn't really concern me because I plan on getting the PS3 version of the game.

 

There are lots of different versions of DRMs, which have a variety of restrictions. Sometimes you have to have an internet connection to play, which is annoying if your internet is spotty or if you're moving around. Sometimes you have to log into Steam, which sucks if you don't like using Steam, or if Steam bugs out on your computer all the time. Sometimes you have restrictions on how manyc omputers you can install it on, or other schemes.

 

Personally, I don't think online DRM is too bad yet, but it can certainly be annoying and it doesn't stop pirates, so I would hate to see it spread or get even more restrictive.

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It won't be a problem for pirates in any case, Steam DRM hasn't stopped cracks since the game it was first used in, though it does stop pre day 1 piracy (as does every online verification system). There are a truly vast number of potential reasons to dislike it but most would probably cite it being a DRM- you're handing over access control of your software in this case to a 3rd party who can arbitrarily rescind it and whose software must be installed, running and monitoring your system if you want to play the game- as being the most significant.

 

This. It leaves your access to the software at the mercy of a company even after you have already purchased the software. The company can go bankrupt or simply change its business policy or cease to maintain its activation servers or do a whole host of other things. This can leave you without access to the software you had purchased - especially if one looks many years down the road. Of course, the pirates will be pretty much unaffected by this, as they will simply play a cracked version of the game.

 

Anyway, as has been pointed out, there are many types of DRM. As far as I am personally concerned, I don't buy games with online DRM for reasons stated above (no exceptions - I even didn't buy games I had highly anticipated because of it, such as Starcraft 2 or Civilization V) and try to avoid buying such software altogether when I can do so (and with games I can always do so, as they are merely entertainment and thus far from essential). I have no problem with some other forms of DRM, such as disc checks. There are people, however, who prefer online DRM, since they don't care much about the above-mentioned issues and enjoy not having to have a disc in the drive to play the game. I am happy for them, but I still wish non-online DRM were still available for me.

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