Jump to content

All you Spanish speakers out there


Pope

Recommended Posts

May 1st, 1806

Uno de mayo de mil ochocientos seis.

 

December 31st, 2004

Treinta y uno de diciembre de dos mil cuatro.

 

January 7th, 1942

Siete de enero de mil novecientos cuarenta y dos.

 

:p

- When he is best, he is a little worse than a man, and when he is worst, he is little better than a beast.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

May 1st, 1806

Uno de mayo de mil ochocientos seis.

 

Isn't it primero de mayo de mil ochocientos seis?

 

Maybe you only say primero for 1st in certain dialects of Spanish, but I know it's that way at least some places.

"Working for Davik was like driving a spike in the side of your head. Sure, you got something new up there, but in the end, you've lost something as well." - Canderous

 

"But I though Jedi weren't allowed to love." - Handmaiden

"But some do it anyway. We call it pulling a Bindo." - The Exile

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heh, I'd never imagined I'd take lessons about my mother language on these boards. Now I've seen it all. :D

 

You are right. Partially right at least. Primero is the ordinal form and it's more of an archaic/highly formal way of putting it, therefore not usually applied to dates. But yes, I've seen it and it certainly is correct. However I didn't think it would have much use outside of logs or official documents, and even then, I think it would be regarded as an archaism.

- When he is best, he is a little worse than a man, and when he is worst, he is little better than a beast.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isn't it primero de mayo de mil ochocientos seis?

 

Maybe you only say primero for 1st in certain dialects of Spanish, but I know it's that way at least some places.

 

Heh, I'd never imagined I'd take lessons about my mother language on these boards. Now I've seen it all. :D

 

You are right. Partially right at least. Primero is the ordinal form and it's more of an archaic/highly formal way of putting it, therefore not usually applied to dates. But yes, I've seen it and it certainly is correct. However I didn't think it would have much use outside of logs or official documents, and even then, I think it would be regarded as an archaism.

 

That's what I come here for - to give language lessons. :)

 

Thanks for explaining it though. I've been studying Spanish for several years now, but I'm been studying "formal" Spanish, so lessons like that in everyday speach are appriciated.

"Working for Davik was like driving a spike in the side of your head. Sure, you got something new up there, but in the end, you've lost something as well." - Canderous

 

"But I though Jedi weren't allowed to love." - Handmaiden

"But some do it anyway. We call it pulling a Bindo." - The Exile

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Being part english-spanish-italian I can testify that you learn the 'received pronunciation' equivalent of any language unless you learn from the people themselves.  Received pronunciation english is the dated BBC form, with no trace of idiolect or idiosyncratic language.

Yeah, I know that I'm not learning "everyday" Spanish. But I live in a part of the United States where there are few Spanish speakers, so it can't really be helped. I'm going to Mexico this summer to work on my Spanish skills with the native speakers.

"Working for Davik was like driving a spike in the side of your head. Sure, you got something new up there, but in the end, you've lost something as well." - Canderous

 

"But I though Jedi weren't allowed to love." - Handmaiden

"But some do it anyway. We call it pulling a Bindo." - The Exile

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, you won't be learning 'spanish' in Mexico. I mean, the language spoken there is a variation of 'regular' spanish but with a lot of changes, phonetical and lexical mostly. It's not like the spanish spoken in Spain. But since the variant of 'spanish' spoken in each country is different, it doesn't really matter much which variant you learn. I really don't like south american accents, but since I'm from Spain, I guess I'm just helplessly biased. :)"

- When he is best, he is a little worse than a man, and when he is worst, he is little better than a beast.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I learned Castillian, and I have had a time understanding people from Mexico. For some reason, even though Georgia has a significant Mexican population, the schools like to teach Castillian. Dunno why. Anyway, I work with a lot of immigrants and their children during my free time, and so I've adjusted, though I still sound like I have a lisp to them (which, of course, is appropriate), and they still sound funny to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, you won't be learning 'spanish' in Mexico. I mean, the language spoken there is a variation of 'regular' spanish but with a lot of changes, phonetical and lexical mostly. It's not like the spanish spoken in Spain. But since the variant of 'spanish' spoken in each country is different, it doesn't really matter much which variant you learn. I really don't like south american accents, but since I'm from Spain, I guess I'm just helplessly biased. :)"

Of course I won't be learning "Spanish" Spanish. But I wouldn't go so far as calling it "Mexican". Besides, living in the United States, Mexican Spanish will be a whole lot more useful to me than Castillian.

"Working for Davik was like driving a spike in the side of your head. Sure, you got something new up there, but in the end, you've lost something as well." - Canderous

 

"But I though Jedi weren't allowed to love." - Handmaiden

"But some do it anyway. We call it pulling a Bindo." - The Exile

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heh, I'd never imagined I'd take lessons about my mother language on these boards. Now I've seen it all. :D

 

You are right. Partially right at least. Primero is the ordinal form and it's more of an archaic/highly formal way of putting it, therefore not usually applied to dates. But yes, I've seen it and it certainly is correct. However I didn't think it would have much use outside of logs or official documents, and even then, I think it would be regarded as an archaism.

 

You wan to know whats really sad my sister in law's parents ar from mexico and speak very little english she translated for them most of her life. She took spanish in school and the teacher continuallytold her she was wrong that words she used didn't exist and that she used them wrong. Pretty bold considering she was second generation Mexican.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Understandable if her teacher actually taught Castillian and not 'spanish'. I don't know how it works over there, but we have something called 'Real Academia' which is somewhat of an unifying criteria for Castillian. They decide what words officially 'exist' and which don't. And believe me, a lot of words used by mexicans don't exist. By our book, at least.

- When he is best, he is a little worse than a man, and when he is worst, he is little better than a beast.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Understandable if her teacher actually taught Castillian and not 'spanish'. I don't know how it works over there, but we have something called 'Real Academia' which is somewhat of an unifying criteria for Castillian. They decide what words officially 'exist' and which don't. And believe me, a lot of words used by mexicans don't exist. By our book, at least.

Understandable but for all intents and purposes wouldn't mexican spanish and Castillian be the same as American english and Proper english? Only very minor differences kind of like an american talking to a brit we both speak english but don't always understand what the other has said, especially when slang is used. We being somewhat ignorant of other cultures lump it all together people from Mexico and Spain both speak spanish even if there are minor differences.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my experience, Dakoth, the difference is much more significant than the difference between American English and British English. I can always get the gist of what a Brit, Aussie, or Canadian is saying in English, but about 20% of the time I don't understand more than 2 words per sentence that a Mexican may say in Spanish (even with all my exposure, there are still words that I don't know).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Understandable if her teacher actually taught Castillian and not 'spanish'. I don't know how it works over there, but we have something called 'Real Academia' which is somewhat of an unifying criteria for Castillian. They decide what words officially 'exist' and which don't. And believe me, a lot of words used by mexicans don't exist. By our book, at least.

I know that France has a similar organization that decides what is "French". I know of no such organization in the United States. Do most European countries have such a group?

 

Clarification: I'm referring to a government organization, not dictionary publishers.

"Working for Davik was like driving a spike in the side of your head. Sure, you got something new up there, but in the end, you've lost something as well." - Canderous

 

"But I though Jedi weren't allowed to love." - Handmaiden

"But some do it anyway. We call it pulling a Bindo." - The Exile

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my experience, Dakoth, the difference is much more significant than the difference between American English and British English. I can always get the gist of what a Brit, Aussie, or Canadian is saying in English, but about 20% of the time I don't understand more than 2 words per sentence that a Mexican may say in Spanish (even with all my exposure, there are still words that I don't know).

Even in my little experience in Spanish, I find that this is the case, although most people I've talked to said they understood more that 20%.

"Working for Davik was like driving a spike in the side of your head. Sure, you got something new up there, but in the end, you've lost something as well." - Canderous

 

"But I though Jedi weren't allowed to love." - Handmaiden

"But some do it anyway. We call it pulling a Bindo." - The Exile

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...