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Halric

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About Halric

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  1. I'm told that in the pinned FAQ they make mention of releasing a patch this week, so hopefully tomorrow (Friday April 3rd) we will get a fix for this. It's frustrating for sure, but once it is patched and people can resume playing the game, then hopefully we will all be too busy in the game to post on forums.
  2. I disagree, judging by the volume of people still asking when it will be released (I believe there was another post just this morning). You can stubbornly post it in one place and say, "that's good enough, just ignore all the other posts or chastise them for not finding it". Or you can say "If I have to keep telling people where to find it, perhaps I'm not communicating as well as I could." The goal posts have never moved, my point was always centered on communication as a tool to mitigate frustration. Previous examples would include such titles as Inquistion, Assassins Creed Unity, Watch
  3. They have! It'll be this week, which a pinned thread right at the top of the forum says! Yes, you are right, there is a pinned post describing the bugs reported so far. But it makes no mention of when a patch is expected, and doesn't solve the issue that a pinned support forum post shouldn't be the sole method of a major update to your customers for a product. I would expect them to post it on their front page, or contact Polygon/Kotaku etc with a follow up response to the articles those media outlets have run about the game's issues. More communication is always better than less
  4. I agree, that being said I think that they should be interested in the most efficient way to communicate due to their limited resources. Perhaps communicate using the games media, an email response to their articles would be enough to prompt the journalists to post an update. Also perhaps use the front page of their site. The most visible areas should be used to get the information out successfully the first time. Hoping that everyone will dive into the forums, and read all the pinned threads for information is wishful thinking. And ends up being more work for them in the end.
  5. They have! It'll be this week, which a pinned thread right at the top of the forum says! Yes, you are right, there is a pinned post describing the bugs reported so far. But it makes no mention of when a patch is expected, and doesn't solve the issue that a pinned support forum post shouldn't be the sole method of a major update to your customers for a product. I would expect them to post it on their front page, or contact Polygon/Kotaku etc with a follow up response to the articles those media outlets have run about the game's issues. More communication is always better than less
  6. Whether you agree that bugs are acceptable or not, one thing that I do think Obsidian needs to improve is communication. There have been many AAA broken releases in recent history, DAI: Inquisition suffered from frequent crashes to desktop and usability issues. Though Bioware made a public statement, through the games media, to let everyone know what the major bugs were, which ones would be fixed in the next patch, and a rough time frame for delivery of said patch. Customers shouldn't have to dig through support forums to search for posts from developers to try and estimate a delivery d
  7. Day/Night cycles really help the world seem real, and offer some intresting quest possibilities. If there are quests that required a certain time of day then there must be a mechanic to allow the player to easily fast forward to a desired time. Of course there will also have to be some design put into the quests so the player can't stall or muck up a quest because of the time of day.
  8. D&D Has a similar system that was the "Lengendary" items supplement for 3.5 It was built on the concept that some rare and powerful items actually gained levels with the character, but it wasn't guarenteed and the player had to make sacrifices for greater item power through rituals and the like (Some involved taking penalties to abilities). Sometimes, such rituals required certain conditions or reagents that were difficult to obtain like having to use the sword to kill a powerful demon or a rare gem not native to the prime material plane. These items spawned fun side quests to make
  9. I agree with Kane_Severance, while it would be nice to have randomness in storylines it will soon result in an exponential increase in possible paths making the task of writing the story a massive undertaking. In my experience, when developers decide to do this it usually results in a lessening of overall story quality in favour of quanitity. They start having to make assumptions in order to bring the story back on track that leave the player scratching their head wondering what just happened. If you want to peek at a guide and evaluate all the paths necessary, and that is fun for you, the
  10. I don't think you can take AC to that high level and not include HP in the abstraction. If what you said is true, and AC is only responsible for preventing damaging contact to the physical body, then it should be possible for me to do HP damage without hitting the target's Armour Class. Which we know is impossible because AC is the target number for an attack roll. Why should I be able to do HP damage? Hit Points, as we know, are not isoalted to a measure of one's health, they are also a measure of one's combat training and fighting ability. Which is why they increase with level, the chara
  11. D&D's AC mechanic leaves a lot ot be desired, and that stems from a fundamental problem with what Hit Points actually are, because they are a blend of several factors. There were a few posts that were a bit confused about AC in D&D, AC did not mitigate any damage at all. It was a mechanic that either prevented damage completely, or left it to the mysterious Hit Point pool to deal with. Once you got hit in D&D, that's it, you're taking damage. How much? well there were other things that allowed you to mitigate, like feats, and most importantly, what level you were. For instance
  12. I agree Two handed weapons were always a good option for someone who sacrificed defense or number of attacks for greater damage potential. Or someone who just likes large weapons. As long as the attack speed and damage are balanced and not too over the top it'll be fine. To add some food for thought on this topic, 3e offered a "Monkey Grip" feat that would allow characters with sufficient training and strength to wield 2 handed weapons as 1 handed. Going one step further, you would take a bunch of two weapon fighting feats and end up with a melee character who toted 2 two handers. Perh
  13. It sounds like your problem is more with being interrupted and not really to do with casting time. Remove casting time from your argument and put this in terms of table top turn based gameplay. You will still suffer the same fate if you lost the initiative roll, took damage, and failed the concentration check to cast your own spell. The difference here is that there are ways to make your caster harder to interrupt with Combat Casting feats and the like, or just having a good Constitution. This is also assuming the scenario is two mages that are just standing in the middle of a room playin
  14. Auto levelling characters not in the group allows the player the freedom to experiement with different group dynamics. My experience with this approach is, that it still forces some upkeep with those idle characters. While their level may increase their gear usually does not and thus you are still required to re-equip them. This may or may not be an issue if you have an abundance of coin and access to vendors that sell magical items. However, the best items are not usually obtained simply by walking into "MagicMart" and picking some up off the shelf, nor should they be. That cheapens the
  15. I suspect you haven't seen an RPG without them because some people like them =) I have a lot of characters I like to bring to life in an RPG, some of them are human, some of them aren't.
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