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What Are You Reading?


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#1
Baley

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Seeing how the other thread has gone the way of the grave, or Obsidian Moderation in our case, same thing, anyway, I sure bet you're all avid readers, perfect, great, here we go.

I owe Pedersen some quick thoughts on Kierkegaard, and I will post them, I promise, once I get drunk enough and prepare myself for his existentialist dribble, I don't like alcohol all that much, but hey, me and ole' Soren spending a quick night talking in tongues and thinking out loud, for what more can a bloke ask?

Charles Bukowski -  The Last Generation



          it was much easier to be a genius in the twenties, there were
          only 3 or 4 literary magazines and if you got into them
          4 or 5 times you could end up in Gertie's parlor
          you could possibly meet Picasso for a glass of wine, or
          maybe only Miró.


          and yes, if you sent your stuff postmarked from Paris
          chances of publication became much better.
          most writers bottomed their manuscripts with the
          word "Paris" and the date.


          and with a patron there was time to
          write, eat, drink and take drives to Italy and sometimes
          Greece.
          it was good to be photo'd with others of your kind
          it was good to look tidy, enigmatic and thin.
          photos taken on the beach were great.


          and yes, you could write letters to the 15 or 20
          others
          bitching about this and that.


          you might get a letter from Ezra or from Hem; Ezra liked
          to give directions and Hem liked to practice his writing
          in his letters when he couldn't do the other.


          it was a romantic grand game then, full of the fury of
          discovery.


          now


          now there are so many of us, hundreds of literary magazines,
          hundreds of presses, thousands of titles.


          who is to survive out of all this mulch?
          it's almost improper to ask.


          I go back, I read the books about the lives of the boys
          and girls of the twenties.
          if they were the Lost Generation, what would you call us?
          sitting here among the warheads with our electric-touch
          typewriters?


          the Last Generation?


          I'd rather be Lost than Last but as I read these books about
          them
          I feel a gentleness and a generosity


          as I read of the suicide of Harry Crosby in his hotel room
          with his whore
          that seems as real to me as the faucet dripping now
          in my bathroom sink.


          I like to read about them: Joyce blind and prowling the
          bookstores like a tarantula, they said.
          Dos Passos with his clipped newscasts using a pink type-
          writer ribbon.
          D. H. horny and pissed-off, H. D. being smart enough to use
          her initials which seemed much more literary than Hilda
          Doolittle.


          G. B. Shaw, long established, as noble and
          dumb as royalty, flesh and brain turning to marble. a
          bore.


          Huxley promenading his brain with great glee, arguing
          with Lawrence that it wasn't in the belly and the balls,
          that the glory was in the skull.


          and that hick Sinclair Lewis coming to light.


          meanwhile
          the revolution being over, the Russians were liberated and
          dying.
          Gorky with nothing to fight for, sitting in a room trying
          to find phrases praising the government.
          many others broken in victory.


          now


          now there are so many of us
          but we should be grateful, for in a hundred years
          if the world is not destroyed, think, how much
          there will be left of all of this:
          nobody really able to fail or to succeed---just
          relative merit, diminished further by
          our numerical superiority.
          we will all be catalogued and filed.
          all right ...


          if you still have doubts of those other golden
          times
          there were other curious creatures: Richard
          Aldington, Teddy Dreiser, F. Scott, Hart Crane, Wyndham
          Lewis, the
          Black Sun Press.


          but to me, the twenties centered mostly on Hemingway
          coming out of the war and beginning to type.


          it was all so simple, all so deliciously clear


          now


          there are so many of us.


          Ernie, you had no idea how good it had been
          four decades later when you blew your brains into
          the orange juice


          although
          I grant you
          that was not your best work.



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#2
Hurlshot

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I'm currently reading a Bernard Cornwell book titled "The Winter King". Cornwell is one of my favorite writers. He focuses on historical fiction, and his Richard Sharpe Series follows the Duke of Welllington through his career. I also loved the Grail series with followed a Longbowman through parts of the 100 years war. The series had one of the best endings I have ever read, it was simply unique and entirely realistic.

He does a good job of conveying realism with his adventure, and "Winter King" is a bit more fantastical than the other two series I mentioned. It's on King Authur, so he's forced to rely on a lot of conjecture, whereas his other works are taken straight out of the history books.

#3
Pidesco

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Dostoievski - The Gambler

#4
Musopticon?

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Curious fact, my last drinking partner had Bukowski's Post Office in his bag. I thought he was a total jerkface at first but looks can be deciev...and you know.

I just finished reading Mika Waltari's The Etruscan(Turms Kuolematon), which surpisignly enough turned out to be a mild satire on epic, while the book started more like a typical growing up and getting kick out of swords and sorcery type of story. In an ancient greek/etruscan/persian milieu of course, but a fantasy story nonetheless.

Edited by Musopticon?, 26 July 2006 - 02:06 AM.


#5
kirottu

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The Belgariad by David Eddings.

Itīs kinda trip to memorylane when I was young boy and read these and liked them. I have always wondered why the finnish translator felt compelled to change gariad to garion.

#6
Musopticon?

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Oh god, The Belgariad were my first fantasy books. Such memories...


Now I can't even look at the books, since I found out that Eddings just repeats the same character personalities and plots over and over again. Although I think that after his wife came along the books have been gradually worse. I remember reading everything except that new Elder Gods thing. I tried them, but it was just too horrible.

A good name wasted. ;)

#7
Sturm

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Thing I'm reading at the moment, A minor interpretation of Karl Marx and the Commie Manifesto :(

And I had to read a book for english which I have to do an 1000 word essay on by next week (sounds easy and I suppose it is, I just cant be screwed doing it)

#8
Alec

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Crypto, the new book of Dan Brown

#9
Dark Moth

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Haven't started it yet, but have to read The Left Hand of Darkness. Is it any good? Or am I in for a real drag?

#10
Ellester

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Haven't started it yet, but have to read The Left Hand of Darkness.  Is it any good?  Or am I in for a real drag?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Another book I own and haven't read. But it won the Hugo and Nebula awards and is highly regarded. I would assume you won't be dissapointed.

currently reading:
Steven Erikson - Memories of Ice
Charles de Lint - Seven Wild Sisters
Stephen king - Night Shift
George R.R. Martin - A Rretrospective
Edgar Allan Poe's Dark Dreams

Edited by Ellester, 26 July 2006 - 05:12 AM.


#11
astr0creep

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I'm still in my yearly Lord of the Rings journey...

I find it lost a bit of its charms after the movies. :(

#12
Darth Drabek

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Lawrence Block - Stag Party Kill

It's in an anthology called "Pulp Masters" celebrating that gritty crime fiction we all know and love.

#13
Baley

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Curious fact, my last drinking partner had Bukowski's Post Office in his bag.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Heh. I do prefer his poems though. As for being a jerk, well, when you drink, you drink, some turn sappy and others don't, as long as your rectum's intact your friend's a bud. Unless of course you asked him, nicely or clumsily, to deflower it with ease of spirit and mind.

Now, on the other hand, if you thought Bukowski was a jerkface, you should read Women.

Haven't started it yet, but have to read The Left Hand of Darkness.  Is it any good?  Or am I in for a real drag?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Her ideas are good and her heart's in the right place, but Le Guin just ain't a compelling writer, sure, she's above average in the nerdish, bulky world of SF, but outside of it, she just doesn't cut it. The Left Hand does drag a bit, at least it did when I read it a few years back.

Edited by Baley, 26 July 2006 - 06:46 AM.


#14
Archmonarch

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The Belgariad by David Eddings.

Itīs kinda trip to memorylane when I was young boy and read these and liked them. I have always wondered why the finnish translator felt compelled to change gariad to garion.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


The series is called Belgariad, but the character is named Garion. No idea why, its just the way it is.

#15
Musopticon?

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Illias->Illiad
Belgarion->Belgariad

Makes sense, no?

#16
kirottu

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The Belgariad by David Eddings.

Itīs kinda trip to memorylane when I was young boy and read these and liked them. I have always wondered why the finnish translator felt compelled to change gariad to garion.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


The series is called Belgariad, but the character is named Garion. No idea why, its just the way it is.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


But the finnish translator changed it to Belgarion series. Thatīs what I ment.

#17
Musopticon?

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I think the translation thing is kinda explained by my last post. We don't have Illiad here, do we?

#18
WinterSun

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I've read the Iliad, but I thought it was named such for the area being called Ilium.

#19
Baley

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Ilium, Ilion, alternative names for Troy, yes.

#20
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Life of Pi .. by Yann Martel




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