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What's the most interesting science?


Cwicseolfor

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Actually, medice is a science. 

 

Computer science is not really "science".  There are other "real" sciences that go into creating computer components and such, but none of them are called "computer science".  Computer science is not much more than a MCSE type degree with some soldering shop classes thrown in.  At least that's what it's been at every college I have associations with.

 

 

I would suggest determining what it is you are primarily concerned with, the size of your paycheck or the size of your ego.  This will help you decide which to stay away from.  Some pay very well, some don't.  Some give you a gargantuan ego (surmizing you do well and publish some well received works).  A few give you both.

 

 

So I guess Game programming doesn't fall into the realm of computer science? Because from what I've read of the courses at Digipen, they're just about as math intensive as any physics course I've ever read about, quantum physics excluded. :unsure:

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Actually, medice is a science. 

 

Computer science is not really "science".  There are other "real" sciences that go into creating computer components and such, but none of them are called "computer science".  Computer science is not much more than a MCSE type degree with some soldering shop classes thrown in.  At least that's what it's been at every college I have associations with.

 

Depends on what you define as "science". I tend to agree though, that "Software Engineering" might have been a more descriptive term (having spent 5 years at university doing computer science and electronics a long time ago)

;)

“He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would surely suffice.” - Albert Einstein

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However, only physics really goes through the entire range of high level math; group theory, complex analysis, differential geometry, linear algebra, multivariable calculus -- it's all here.

not true... many engineering disciplines have the same. particularly electrical and even more particularly communications/signal processing.

 

btw, there are also many more engineering jobs than physics jobs out there. they tend to pay better on average, too.

 

taks

comrade taks... just because.

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computer science is not software engineering is not science.

 

computer science is mostly related to database and programming structures. software engineering is a term created to describe the engineers that program micro-chips of some sort to solve engineering problems (normally comm or signal processing apps... networking and such included). i.e. software engineers tend to be other types of engineers that use software solutions to solve their problems. i have actually filled the role as a software engineer on many occasions and actually have degrees in electrical engineering (most software engineers i've worked with are electrical, btw).

 

none of these is a true "science" in the strictest sense of the word. science is more about discovering the secrets of our world whereas engineering tends to be more about making things work within our world. i.e. engineering is considered an inexact science (if it works, don't dork with it). computer science in particular seems to have a very odd moniker since it is even less "sciencey" than many other engineering disciplines... oh well.

 

do what you like. take a few classes for review only then decide. i mention the comm/signal processing EE thing above since that is extremely math intensive and more closely related to higher level math than any other discipline i've encountered. that and i'm a career EE working on a phd in comm/signal processing :)

 

taks

comrade taks... just because.

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computer science is not software engineering is not science.

 

computer science is mostly related to database and programming structures.  software engineering is a term created to describe the engineers that program micro-chips of some sort to solve engineering problems (normally comm or signal processing apps... networking and such included).  i.e. software engineers tend to be other types of engineers that use software solutions to solve their problems.  i have actually filled the role as a software engineer on many occasions and actually have degrees in electrical engineering (most software engineers i've worked with are electrical, btw).

 

none of these is a true "science" in the strictest sense of the word.  science is more about discovering the secrets of our world whereas engineering tends to be more about making things work within our world.  i.e. engineering is considered an inexact science (if it works, don't dork with it).  computer science in particular seems to have a very odd moniker since it is even less "sciencey" than many other engineering disciplines... oh well.

 

do what you like.  take a few classes for review only then decide.  i mention the comm/signal processing EE thing above since that is extremely math intensive and more closely related to higher level math than any other discipline i've encountered.  that and i'm a career EE working on a phd in comm/signal processing :)

 

taks

 

Thanks Taks. Electrical engineering sounds itneresting. But I guess for all engineering degrees I've got this picture of technical drawings, autocad, welding, and metalurgy.

 

Time to take a closer look at engineering.

Anyone perfect must be lying, anything easy has its cost

Anyone plain can be lovely, anyone loved can be lost

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Thanks Taks. Electrical engineering sounds itneresting. But I guess for all engineering degrees I've got this picture of technical drawings, autocad, welding, and metalurgy.

 

Time to take a closer look at engineering.

oh no... not at all. technical drawings exist, certainly, but that's only part of the picture. autocad is more of a mechanical designer job, usually related to a 2 year technician type degree. metallurgy has it's own degree (metalurgical, aka "no-sweat-met") and welding is, well, a trade (union).

 

mechanical engineers tend to do a lot of load analysis which involves extensive finite element mathematics. HVAC is another major field as well as airframes, etc.

 

ceramic engineers exist in a similar world as chemical engineers (and even some metalurgical engineers) with the study of complex material interactions (i have a friend that designs the glass beads they use in reflective highway paints and signs).

 

civil engineers design roadways and bridges and stuff. they're also involved with building designs.

 

electrical is unbelievably diverse... computer engineering, software engineering (most are EEs), signal processing/communications (my field), analog circuit design, digital circuit design, radio frequency circuit design, antenna design, micro-chip design (analog and digital), control systems design (the systems that control large automated plants, etc. among other things), power design which could be power systems for a satellite or large power transmission systems for cities and towns... i could go on forever. the six major areas are dsp/comm, digital, analog, power, controls and computers.

 

since you already have a math degree, EE is actually a natural step. my particular interests, btw, revolve around orthonormal bases for various reasons. my theses (MS) was on a subject regarding wavelets, an orthonormal basis alternative to the fourier series providing simultaneous time and frequency analysis capabilities (fourier is only frequency). the theory was advanced primarily by a woman named ingrid daubechies at rutgers, a mathemetician.

 

my work is primarily detection theory (in a nutshell) for which reference #1 is Thomas Bayes, a statistician. his famous work "Essay towards solving a problem in the doctrine of chances" was published in 1764 (posthumously) and is the foundation for Bayesian statistics... my upcoming classwork (phd) includes complex variables and algebraic coding theory, both math classes and both semi-required (at my advisor's behest).

 

if you want a smattering of theory that i live in, do a search on the following: Fourier, Laplace, Hertz, Marconi, Swerling, Central Limit Theorem, Bayes, Nyquist, Claude Shannon, Heaviside, Viterbi (qualcomm founder)... and on it goes.

 

taks

comrade taks... just because.

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Thanks Taks. Electrical engineering sounds itneresting. But I guess for all engineering degrees I've got this picture of technical drawings, autocad, welding, and metalurgy.

 

Time to take a closer look at engineering.

oh no... not at all. technical drawings exist, certainly, but that's only part of the picture. autocad is more of a mechanical designer job, usually related to a 2 year technician type degree. metallurgy has it's own degree (metalurgical, aka "no-sweat-met") and welding is, well, a trade (union).

 

mechanical engineers tend to do a lot of load analysis which involves extensive finite element mathematics. HVAC is another major field as well as airframes, etc.

 

ceramic engineers exist in a similar world as chemical engineers (and even some metalurgical engineers) with the study of complex material interactions (i have a friend that designs the glass beads they use in reflective highway paints and signs).

 

civil engineers design roadways and bridges and stuff. they're also involved with building designs.

 

electrical is unbelievably diverse... computer engineering, software engineering (most are EEs), signal processing/communications (my field), analog circuit design, digital circuit design, radio frequency circuit design, antenna design, micro-chip design (analog and digital), control systems design (the systems that control large automated plants, etc. among other things), power design which could be power systems for a satellite or large power transmission systems for cities and towns... i could go on forever. the six major areas are dsp/comm, digital, analog, power, controls and computers.

 

since you already have a math degree, EE is actually a natural step. my particular interests, btw, revolve around orthonormal bases for various reasons. my theses (MS) was on a subject regarding wavelets, an orthonormal basis alternative to the fourier series providing simultaneous time and frequency analysis capabilities (fourier is only frequency). the theory was advanced primarily by a woman named ingrid daubechies at rutgers, a mathemetician.

 

my work is primarily detection theory (in a nutshell) for which reference #1 is Thomas Bayes, a statistician. his famous work "Essay towards solving a problem in the doctrine of chances" was published in 1764 (posthumously) and is the foundation for Bayesian statistics... my upcoming classwork (phd) includes complex variables and algebraic coding theory, both math classes and both semi-required (at my advisor's behest).

 

if you want a smattering of theory that i live in, do a search on the following: Fourier, Laplace, Hertz, Marconi, Swerling, Central Limit Theorem, Bayes, Nyquist, Claude Shannon, Heaviside, Viterbi (qualcomm founder)... and on it goes.

 

taks

 

 

My brain hurts. ;)

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Thanks Taks. Electrical engineering sounds itneresting. But I guess for all engineering degrees I've got this picture of technical drawings, autocad, welding, and metalurgy.

 

Time to take a closer look at engineering.

oh no... not at all. technical drawings exist, certainly, but that's only part of the picture. autocad is more of a mechanical designer job, usually related to a 2 year technician type degree. metallurgy has it's own degree (metalurgical, aka "no-sweat-met") and welding is, well, a trade (union).

 

mechanical engineers tend to do a lot of load analysis which involves extensive finite element mathematics. HVAC is another major field as well as airframes, etc.

 

ceramic engineers exist in a similar world as chemical engineers (and even some metalurgical engineers) with the study of complex material interactions (i have a friend that designs the glass beads they use in reflective highway paints and signs).

 

civil engineers design roadways and bridges and stuff. they're also involved with building designs.

 

electrical is unbelievably diverse... computer engineering, software engineering (most are EEs), signal processing/communications (my field), analog circuit design, digital circuit design, radio frequency circuit design, antenna design, micro-chip design (analog and digital), control systems design (the systems that control large automated plants, etc. among other things), power design which could be power systems for a satellite or large power transmission systems for cities and towns... i could go on forever. the six major areas are dsp/comm, digital, analog, power, controls and computers.

 

since you already have a math degree, EE is actually a natural step. my particular interests, btw, revolve around orthonormal bases for various reasons. my theses (MS) was on a subject regarding wavelets, an orthonormal basis alternative to the fourier series providing simultaneous time and frequency analysis capabilities (fourier is only frequency). the theory was advanced primarily by a woman named ingrid daubechies at rutgers, a mathemetician.

 

my work is primarily detection theory (in a nutshell) for which reference #1 is Thomas Bayes, a statistician. his famous work "Essay towards solving a problem in the doctrine of chances" was published in 1764 (posthumously) and is the foundation for Bayesian statistics... my upcoming classwork (phd) includes complex variables and algebraic coding theory, both math classes and both semi-required (at my advisor's behest).

 

if you want a smattering of theory that i live in, do a search on the following: Fourier, Laplace, Hertz, Marconi, Swerling, Central Limit Theorem, Bayes, Nyquist, Claude Shannon, Heaviside, Viterbi (qualcomm founder)... and on it goes.

 

taks

 

 

My brain hurts. :wacko:

 

Mine doesn't. :p Engineering sounds pretty sweet, especially ceremics and materials engineering.

Anyone perfect must be lying, anything easy has its cost

Anyone plain can be lovely, anyone loved can be lost

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Thanks Taks. Electrical engineering sounds itneresting. But I guess for all engineering degrees I've got this picture of technical drawings, autocad, welding, and metalurgy.

 

Time to take a closer look at engineering.

oh no... not at all. technical drawings exist, certainly, but that's only part of the picture. autocad is more of a mechanical designer job, usually related to a 2 year technician type degree. metallurgy has it's own degree (metalurgical, aka "no-sweat-met") and welding is, well, a trade (union).

 

mechanical engineers tend to do a lot of load analysis which involves extensive finite element mathematics. HVAC is another major field as well as airframes, etc.

 

ceramic engineers exist in a similar world as chemical engineers (and even some metalurgical engineers) with the study of complex material interactions (i have a friend that designs the glass beads they use in reflective highway paints and signs).

 

civil engineers design roadways and bridges and stuff. they're also involved with building designs.

 

electrical is unbelievably diverse... computer engineering, software engineering (most are EEs), signal processing/communications (my field), analog circuit design, digital circuit design, radio frequency circuit design, antenna design, micro-chip design (analog and digital), control systems design (the systems that control large automated plants, etc. among other things), power design which could be power systems for a satellite or large power transmission systems for cities and towns... i could go on forever. the six major areas are dsp/comm, digital, analog, power, controls and computers.

 

since you already have a math degree, EE is actually a natural step. my particular interests, btw, revolve around orthonormal bases for various reasons. my theses (MS) was on a subject regarding wavelets, an orthonormal basis alternative to the fourier series providing simultaneous time and frequency analysis capabilities (fourier is only frequency). the theory was advanced primarily by a woman named ingrid daubechies at rutgers, a mathemetician.

 

my work is primarily detection theory (in a nutshell) for which reference #1 is Thomas Bayes, a statistician. his famous work "Essay towards solving a problem in the doctrine of chances" was published in 1764 (posthumously) and is the foundation for Bayesian statistics... my upcoming classwork (phd) includes complex variables and algebraic coding theory, both math classes and both semi-required (at my advisor's behest).

 

if you want a smattering of theory that i live in, do a search on the following: Fourier, Laplace, Hertz, Marconi, Swerling, Central Limit Theorem, Bayes, Nyquist, Claude Shannon, Heaviside, Viterbi (qualcomm founder)... and on it goes.

 

taks

 

 

My brain hurts. ;)

 

Mine doesn't. :p Engineering sounds pretty sweet, especially ceremics and materials engineering.

 

 

I was joking. ;) I understood most of it, except the bits that I haven't come across yet. I'll stick to Game Development, heavy on the math, heavier on the fun. ;)

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there aren't many ceramic engineering programs in the world, and i think met lacks a huge representation as well (plenty of chem, however). missouri-rolla (my school for BS and MS) does have all three as well as 16 other engineering related degrees.

 

taks

comrade taks... just because.

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there aren't many ceramic engineering programs in the world, and i think met lacks a huge representation as well (plenty of chem, however).  missouri-rolla (my school for BS and MS) does have all three as well as 16 other engineering related degrees.

 

taks

 

The schools I'm looking at have them all, too. I guess I'm lucky. :p

Anyone perfect must be lying, anything easy has its cost

Anyone plain can be lovely, anyone loved can be lost

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Genetics?You wouldnt believe the mathematics that are involved in this science!(not that is comparable with the other sciences that taks mentioned)

Especially the part that is called "structural biogenetics of the human species"

Life... is strength. That is not to be contested; it seems logical enough. You live; you affect your world

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hehe, genetics is probably more of a science than any i mentioned. completely uncharted territory whereas most engineering fields are about applying known theory to different situations. though maybe not as mathish, i'll agree ;)

 

taks

comrade taks... just because.

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Genetics?You wouldnt believe the mathematics that are involved in this science!(not that is comparable with the other sciences that taks mentioned)

Especially the part that is called "structural biogenetics of the human species"

 

Bioinformatics. :D

 

Considered it. Though concerned about variety of mathemaqtics, not jsut quantity.

Anyone perfect must be lying, anything easy has its cost

Anyone plain can be lovely, anyone loved can be lost

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