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StreetBushido

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About StreetBushido

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  1. I really liked the portraits in the Baldur's Gate games, both Icewind Dale games and the first Neverwinter Nights. Basically, I'd like to see something similar in Project Eternity. It would be nice with a decent selection of portraits for each race, gender and class combination so that we don't end up with just one or two portraits for female orlan warriors, or male godlike monks for example. I realize that many portraits will most likely be class neutral, but still. Most importantly, I'd prefer it if the NPC portraits were kept separate from the PC portraits, and unselectable (or at least with some kind of warning). As Jarmo here above mentions, I too found it annoying that you could end up with a party member that shared your portrait.
  2. I agree with the general sentiment of this post, and the idea of characters carrying headgear under their arm. Once again, it's a question of minor details. But then, the devil is in the details. Yes, these are small things and many may not even notice them, but for those that do notice these little things, it'll help to make the world that much more alive and interesting.
  3. Please, folks, let's always remember for this game that cosmetic issues are going to be a LOT more minor because your character will be ONE. INCH. HIGH. You really won't be able to see details like this for 90% of the stuff. This has been a public service message. This is very true, and so it is quite easy to fix this "issue" (it's such a small matter). Simply show the characters not holding a weapon when in a peaceful area. Also, with the technical progress that has been made, I am sure that such details can be implemented without too much of a headache, even if the results will not be all that obvious. One of the games that really annoyed me with this was Knights of the Old Republic (1 & 2 actually). Characters would sometimes hold their weapons in (non-hostile) cutscenes and even when fiddling with locked boxes or computers. How do you type on a keyboard while holding two blasters at the same time?
  4. This is a very minor matter that is purely cosmetic, but still something that I would like to see. In the old IE games, and even in many newer games, characters always grip their equipped weapons. To me this was slightly jarring when the characters were moving in an obviously peaceful area. It was especially funny when a character had a flaming weapon and were toting it about town, and nobody batted an eye at it. I'm guessing this was due to technical limitations, as the added animations for drawing and sheathing would have taken too much time and energy to include. It would be nice if characters could put away their weapons. Maybe they'd only do it in "safe" areas, such as cities and towns. Or maybe they could do as they do in Dragon Age and put them away between fights. From a mechanical perspective the drawing of weapons could be ignored as a delay, as I think DA does.
  5. I usually make some kind of melee character since I've never liked vancian magic, or in general not wanting my character to be the support. If the magic system in this game is more interesting than usual, I might break out of my mold and make some kind of spellcaster. Otherwise I'll probably go for some suave, agility-based fighter. Godlike Fighter or Rogue, maybe. Or monk, because they are awesome.
  6. I haven't read the whole thread, but I'd like to add my opinion to this discussion anyway, based soley on the OP. I agree that it shouldn't be too easy, but at the same time it would be nice to be able to retreat if you find a need to, for whatever reason. Perhaps this megadungeon will contain various amenities (traders, temples, some form of inns, etc.), but some other reason may cause the player to to just want to leave. After a few levels maybe the player wants to engage some more in the story rather than just dungeoncrawl (some other story than that of the dungeon, then). Perhaps an exit every second level? I'd actually prefer an exit each level, but that may be seen as "too easy". I don't quite remember how Watcher's Keep in Throne of Bhaal worked, but it had an exit about every level or so, I think. I appreciate the freedom of choice: I could leave if I wanted to, but I could also keep going. I think that's the most important bit: give players the freedom of choice. The megadungeon will be one more thing to enjoy in the game. It's not about proving anything to anybody, it's about playing a game you enjoy to play. And giving me choices on how I can engage with the game helps me enjoy it. For those that want it to be more challenging or difficult, throw in an achievement for never exiting the dungeon on the way down, and maybe an achievement for only having left every 5 levels. Or something similar. After having crawled through four levels maybe I'm going "Gah, I don't even remember how the sun looks anymore. Let's get outta here!" and it would be nice if I could, after exploration, find a way out. When I'm ready for more dungoneering, I could come back to that exit/entrance and continue where I left off.
  7. Non-human races such as The Elder Scrolls' Khajit and Argonians could be interesting. On the other hand, fully animal characters with human level intelligence and sentience would be quite strange, and perhaps not fit the setting very well. As shape for a shapeshifter, yes. As a complete playable race? I don't think it would work all that well. But then, the number of playable races has been set now and I'm afraid that further discussion at this point will probably not budge that. Not that I mind: I think it is preferable to have a few well defined races than a huge pile of shoddily written ones. I agree that every weapon type should be useful. Including a type of weapon that is universally crap would be a bummer for players who want to specialize in that type of weapon. To me, an important part of these games is getting better equipment. In a fantasy setting, that most often means magical weapons. I agree with that, and feel that is what works best. A lot of fantasy literature follows this trope as well. If you are a good swordsman and your sword also helps you fight, you are going to beat a good swordsman with a regular sword. If you are a crappy swordsman with a helpful sword, you will at least level the field against the good swordsman. I think the best impementation of drugs of any kind is that used in the Fallout series: it gives you a temporary boost, but comes at a cost as you crash after a time. The Baldur's Gate games also handled drinking in an interesting way: every time (or every few times, maybe) you bought a drink you also heard a rumor. If drinking only means losing money and getting drunk, with no further interaction than that, I don't see why anybody would do it.
  8. I agree with the OP's initial statement, with the additions that have been made throughout this thread. A levelheaded exchange of opinions backed up with a bit of an explanation for said opinion is, in my opinion (heh), the preferable mode of discussion here (or anywhere, for that matter). At the same time I am inclined to at least partially agree with those that ideas that are completely "out there" and in general do not fit the scope and spirit of the project should be treated as such, if not with agression and hostility. In short, be cool. One love.
  9. That's just the thing. We're so used with first level characters being quite weak. As they should be, sure, but it's about the scale of the overarching conflict and the feel of the setting in general. Basically, we've already seen quite a few games where a low level character is killing puny creatures. It's more seldom that we see low level characters take on more impressive/interesting foes.
  10. It has been stated and confirmed that the game will have three different hardcore modes and I'm pretty sure that there will be the usual difficulty scale of Easy to Hard aside from that. I think the best method is to allow players to play the game as they want to. It's about enjoying the experience, not proving anything to anybody. While some may want to play the game in a certain way for the challenge, and perhaps the bragging rights, others may not. Having these readily available extra difficulty levels should be sufficient to satisfy most players, I think. This talk about "hardcore gaming" etc. is just another layer of exclusionary behaviour. Us against them. The tag "gamer" is bad enough as it already works to separate people (ineffectually at that, the word lacks a proper definition). Within that we then have people who want to go further with the "us vs. them" mentality by self-identifying as "hardcore". "I am hardcore, you are not". What purpose does that serve but to further separate people? Am I making too much of this? Yes, but it is an issue that is occasionally on my mind, and this seemed like a decent place to let it out a bit. Back on topic: http://www.kickstart...ty/posts/316398 this update discusses the extra game modes.
  11. While it would be funny to see some kind of subversion of the usual "newbie adventurer having to work their way up from fighting rats in a basement to sickly goblins with rusty forks" I would actually prefer a more serious subversion of that trope. Pit us against something that makes us feel like the protagonist of the story, and not the stablehand or errand boy! Maybe the basement is full of wererats that are currently in rat form? Nasty surprise that!
  12. 140$ + 20$ for transport. Give me the box, man! Daddy needs that box!
  13. Things are looking good in regards to that second city! This is gonna be great. It feels good to be a part of this phenomena, actually. I'm sure there will be some form of cool interconnections between the two cities. I hope the player's actions will be able to affect their relationship towards each other.
  14. For me, a good example of a game that was too big was GTA: San Andreas. I liked the game, sure. It had a ton of content and loads of stuff to do, but I think the problem was that the sheer amount of stuff in the game started to dilute the experience. As has been stated in this thread: filler is no fun. I'd rather eat a really tasty little sandwich than a bland and boring footlong. However, if the game manages to be engaging and interesting all the way, regardless of its length (or amount of content) then there is really no upper limit, I think. A strange comparison perhaps, but look at Portal 1. It's a short game, yet it is really good and engages throughout: it never overstays its welcome. EDIT: Grammar.
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