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Favourite Development Language & Enviroment


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I always wondered what Visual Studio people use for version control. All other IDEs that I used have some kind of CVS or Subversion plugin, does Visual Studio have it?

 

Perforce, Alienbrain, Sourcesafe, etc.

How do they compare to CVS/SVN?

 

I would say Perforce > CVS/SVN > Sourcesafe. I haven't used Alienbrain, but from word of mouth I heard it's OK but really pricey. Perforce is nice, and it integrates into max as well. Sourcesafe is elderly, and needs to retire. It has tons problems with really large projects, however as expected, it integrates really well into visual studio.

Follow me on twitter - @adam_brennecke

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Vim ('vi improved') does use arrow keys. 'h', j', 'k', 'l' are for people who don't want lift their hands to reach them. Aside from it, what is so bad about vim?

 

 

And what is so great about Ted for that matter?

 

 

I have never used Vim.....but I loathe vi.

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Vim ('vi improved') does use arrow keys. 'h', j', 'k', 'l' are for people who don't want lift their hands to reach them. Aside from it, what is so bad about vim?

 

 

And what is so great about Ted for that matter?

 

 

I have never used Vim.....but I loathe vi.

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I have two main languages of choice C++ and Python.

When efficiency is a must, or for larger projects I like C++ and Visual Studio 2005. (haven't run into a scenario where C++ is to slow yet).

 

For prototyping and playing around with algorithms or if speed is not a problem, I usually use Python, mainly because i love pythons syntax and the freedom to combine functional and imperative programing styles. In this scenario I simply use the text editor of the moment to code in (haven't found one I'm perfectly happy with yet, the favorites so far are the above mentioned Notepad++ and ConText or CrimsonEdit).

 

As for versioning tool I have only tried CVS and SVN, but greatly prefer SVN since binary files aren't such a hassle when using it.

Question to all of you that have used some of the commercial alternatives: How does using them differ from using SVN, and what features do those packages have that SVN lacks?

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I really enjoyed C++, but my experience with it is still pretty limited. The overwhelming bulk of my programming experience has been with Java, which I find to be simply okay.

 

Java *Shudders*.

 

Did some HLSL coding today, really enjoied it, and it's fairly simple... And extremely powerful.

 

I find that writing shaders is easier straight into notepad opposed to using something like render monkey or FX composer, notepad provides better results, render monkey kinda screws up to the Shaders formating when you export, FX composer isn't very user friendly.

 

So for shaders notepad is teh win!!!

Edited by @\NightandtheShape/@

RS_Silvestri_01.jpg

 

"I'm a programmer at a games company... REET GOOD!" - Me

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This thread is getting stale.

 

Anyway,

 

(drum roll)

#! /usr/bin/perl

`$=`;$_=\%!;($_)=/(.)/;$==++$|;($.,$/,$,,$\,$",$;,$^,$#,$~,$*,$:,@%)=(
$!=~/(.)(.).(.)(.)(.)(.)..(.)(.)(.)..(.)......(.)/,$"),$=++;$.++;$.++;
$_++;$_++;($_,$\,$,)=($~.$"."$;$/$%[$?]$_$\$,$:$%[$?]",$"&$~,$#,);$,++
;$,++;$^|=$";`$_$\$,$/$:$;$~$*$%[$?]$.$~$*${#}$%[$?]$;$\$"$^$~$*.>&$=`

(it prints "Just another Perl hacker.")

Edited by Diamond

This statement is false.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I've been teaching myself Java and OOP (a huge change after nearly 30 years of procedural thinking) and it's a lot of fun. I use NetBeans and Sun's JDK, and I'm practicing on Near Infinity.

 

The thing about OOP is that it really isn't that far from procedural thinking (you usually end up with an object that controls all the other objects), the only difference really, is that you work with an object, which is basically a collection of objects, opposed to raw datatypes.

 

I'd never argue one approach is better than the other.

 

one of the reasons I like C++ is because you can approch it in a procedural way and an OO way, or just mix them both togeather and make an ugly mess that runs really fast :).

 

Edit: OOP languages do tend to have advantages in regards to working with multiple threads or CPU's in that the approch is simpler. Atleast in my experience.

Edited by @\NightandtheShape/@

RS_Silvestri_01.jpg

 

"I'm a programmer at a games company... REET GOOD!" - Me

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I'm having fun with Java and OOP. I found the Head First books to be great for someone trying to break into a new programming concept. I have Head First Java, OOP, and Design Patterns. They use many illustrations (both in word and picture) examples, puzzles, and exercises to help the reader understand the subject. I also have a complete Java Reference book for the latest J2SE edition, and of course Sun's JDK, docs, and NetBeans IDE.

 

I have Near Infinity's source code (thanks to Jon Olav following the GPL), and the more I learn, the more I can see where I can improve his code. NI was his learning experience; he's now writing Java apps commercially. Now NI is my learning experience. I'm editing it because I still use it regularly, and it has some serious limitations. Plus I want to add visual (wysiwyg) editors, and that'll be all new code.

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I'm having fun with Java and OOP. I found the Head First books to be great for someone trying to break into a new programming concept. I have Head First Java, OOP, and Design Patterns. They use many illustrations (both in word and picture) examples, puzzles, and exercises to help the reader understand the subject. I also have a complete Java Reference book for the latest J2SE edition, and of course Sun's JDK, docs, and NetBeans IDE.

 

I have Near Infinity's source code (thanks to Jon Olav following the GPL), and the more I learn, the more I can see where I can improve his code. NI was his learning experience; he's now writing Java apps commercially. Now NI is my learning experience. I'm editing it because I still use it regularly, and it has some serious limitations. Plus I want to add visual (wysiwyg) editors, and that'll be all new code.

 

That's pretty cool stuff.

 

I think the most bizzare way I have had to think, in regards to programming, coming from a sequencial procedural background myself originally, is multithreading a octree, but after that first experience, it's all be plain sailing.

 

That reminds me, microsoft did something really cool a while back... Free Visual Studio

RS_Silvestri_01.jpg

 

"I'm a programmer at a games company... REET GOOD!" - Me

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  • 1 month later...

I am looking into a programming language and i first had a look at perl. I know stuff like

my $variable = ("hello my name is ");
my @array = ("Glove","master");
print "$variable @array[0] @array[1]\n";

will print

hello my name is Glove master

 

So then i decided to look at C++ and i realised that it was almost exactly like the script we use in game modding. the layout is the same and most of the functions.

 

C++

#include "a_file"
int main()
{
//your code
}

 

KotOR Script (NSS)

#include "a_file"
void main()
{
//your code
}

 

I was wondering, which one would be better to learn out of C++ or Perl?

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