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3d shooter in 96K


nik_bg

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This is cool. Of course, I don't believe generating textures and sounds would ever be a viable option, for 2 reasons.

1. The amount of processing required to create good graphics this way will always exceed the amount doing it the tradiional way. Hence, the traditional way will always manage to look better.

2. This is a way to save space, and storage is getting ever large and cheaper, making it less necessary.

 

My hat is off to those guys though... Brilliant programming (I see a lot of people on the net saying how "easy" it would be to do or mocking them for not writing it all in assembly... I'd like to see them make something before criticising).

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No doubt it's a nice chunk of code. Procedural texturing is fairly common these days, but nothign to this extent. It's more of a proof of concept, but nice to see people taking on these challenges. I wonder if they are looking for work...=)

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I didn't even know it was possible to code a 3D-engine in under 100Kb! And they managed to cram in graphics, level design, weapons, monster design, weak monster AI, lighting effects (!), shadows, a few menu options and even a small demo running before the actual "game".

 

Well, I am truly impressed. 96kb. I've taken bigger pictures of my d!ck, and that's saying something!

Swedes, go to: Spel2, for the latest game reviews in swedish!

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Very impressive, I remember a found out about the 64k demo scene in a forum a couple of years ago and was totally amazed, back then it was flybys with the cool geometry and music, actually not much worse than what you see in this demo and now they've gone and done this heh, nice !

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  • 2 weeks later...

Wow that was awsome! 96k? I'm truely blown away. I could only imagine what that game could be inside of 10 meg! I dont understand how they got the Music compressed into such a small file? But then again I'm not a dev so I wouldnt know these things.

 

Anyhow GJ guys, that was truely amazing!

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Guest Surlent

JohnDoe

2. This is a way to save space, and storage is getting ever large and cheaper, making it less necessary

 

What about handheld gaming platforms ?

I think this idea would do well there.

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This is cool. Of course, I don't believe generating textures and sounds would ever be a viable option, for 2 reasons.

1. The amount of processing required to create good graphics this way will always exceed the amount doing it the tradiional way. Hence, the traditional way will always manage to look better.

How does 'reduced processing' mean better looking textures? The textures in this game are as good as most games out right now. These bricks, for example, though they are a little too specular. Things like faces and paintings on the walls would be difficult to model with this system, but for wall and floor textures, this is great.

 

The most interesting thing about this game is that the frikkin level geometry, models, and animations are procedural (and they have a demo that has procedural voicing). The sound and music aren't as hard to imagine (the sounds sound like fm).

 

If one can create level and model geometry this well algorithmically, then you can possibly create random levels (with mind-numbingly complex heuristics) that would look this good. Random towns you would encounter on a map would be different every time you played a game. In a galactic exploration game you could find a new world every time you landed, like you would if you were actually exploring the galaxy. Hell, the entire game might be different every time. This would be a lot of work, yes, and much more research needs to be done on this subject. Occasionally your generated medieval town might be a big cube with dodecahedron buildings and your generated aliens might be blue puddles that only talk about cheese, but if it actually worked reliably...that would cool.

 

This is something I've always wanted to do in a game ( my dream job -- random-procedural content generation, or so I call it ), ever since I played Planet's Edge. Nice to see it's being done so well without me. :(

 

Do any Dev's know about research on content generation? Any papers or articles? I'd appreciate it.

Oh Jimmy, you were so funny.

Don't let me down.

From habit he lifts his watch; it shows him its blank face.

Zero hour, Snowman thinks. Time to go.

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crakkie,

 

you are completely rigth. IMO this is the future of all games - dynamically generated random content. This is completely new universe compared with today's technology. We need much more time when it will be available. But even in today's games it is possible to add such - e.g. in KOTOR like games we may think about random placement of boxes/chests and their content, random placement of your opponents before fight, something like this.

 

I also woulk like to ask software developers (hey, FrankK, where are you :lol: ) if they could provide links to some articles on this subject. I've found only on procedural texturing.

 

Nik.

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I googled around and found a few.

 

http://www.centralpictures.com/ce/tp/paper.pdf

An academic paper on building procedural cities.

 

http://unreal.epicgames.com/Fire/AnimatingTextures.htm

Unreal's procedural textures

 

http://www.planetside.co.uk/terragen/galle...=8&ind=1&group=

A somewhat impressive procedural landscape design program

 

http://mrl.nyu.edu/~perlin/doc/hypertexture/

Noise, from Perlin

 

http://www.gamasutra.com/features/20010302/oneil_01.htm

Procedural planet generation

 

http://accad.osu.edu/~smay/al.pdf

A procedural modeling and animation language

 

http://liris.cnrs.fr/docs/RR-2004-008.pdf

Putting cracks in your models, procedurally of course

 

http://www.devx.com/Intel/Article/20182

Procedural content creation overview

 

Initiative! That's what I need more of. Hope this helps, nik.

Oh Jimmy, you were so funny.

Don't let me down.

From habit he lifts his watch; it shows him its blank face.

Zero hour, Snowman thinks. Time to go.

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crakkie,

 

Thank you for the list. I have found in a prevoius search most of these articles. Another interesting link is http://mandelbrot.dazibao.free.fr

 

Perlin functions are known since 1983 and they are really very usefull for generating textures and bump maps. Unfortunately this approach is very resource consuming and is not applicable at run time, but at design time great looking textures can be created by artists and designers. I myself plan to write a small texture/bump editor based on perlin functions - just for fun :rolleyes:

 

The more interesting is to create some modeling script engine. There are 2 links in your list on this topic I haven't found and I will read them very carefully, also will search for others.

 

Nik.

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