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Greenvise

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About Greenvise

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  1. I know it'll never happen - I know it in my soul - but god damn it I would stalk and murder as many hobos as you command if you would use the grid-based combat system of the actual Pathfinder game.
  2. That's awesome. I desperately want this game to A.) incorporate co-op (which is the heart of the original cardboard game) so that my girlfriend and I can play together, and B.) make it to Steam (and then put out S&S, MM, etc). Any recognition or accolade that PACG garners is another step towards never having to shuffle again while still getting to share the game with the girlfriend. Woot!
  3. I'm not sure the OP's question is really being answered. Emphasis mine. From your post, OP, I think you've got one fundamental thing wrong: there very much are elements of randomness (and randomized sets of cards) in the Pathfinder Adventure Card Game. The cards you encounter are divided into decks, and the kinds of cards that you find in each deck are standardized and unchanging. Whenever you visit the Waterfront location, you will always find four monster cards, two barrier cards, one item card, two ally cards, and one henchman (or villain) card. But which monsters, barriers, items, and allies you encounter at each location are entirely random; it will be different every time you play. The cards that make up each deck are drawn from the whole of your collection - which is called "the box" in the physical game, and "the vault" in the app. The treasure chests add cards to your collection - your "vault" - and therefore add different cards and sometimes overall better cards to the pool of possible encounters that you can come across on any given playthrough. Also noteworthy is that the chests only contain "good" cards - which are called boons - to your vault. You'll never add more monsters or barriers to your collection by collecting chests, only cards that your characters might want to collect for their decks: armor, weapons, items, spells, blessings, and allies. In short: the bulk of the game is not "scripted" at all - the stuff you see in-game is pulled at random from a (much, much) larger set of cards. Hopefully that clarifies things for you!
  4. Fitting that the username of the first user to "like" this post is... jumpthegun.
  5. Thanks! So I go on vacation out of the country - no Wi-Fi for days - and I come home to a contest victory and the release of Deck 4? How sad is it that I am more excited about this than for the vacation I took?
  6. Tragic? It's a freaking game, for crying out loud. What's tragic is the 5 year old child with no food to eat today and the even younger child that calls a trash heap his bed. What you have is a first world problem, nothing more. Tragedy, like most things in this world, is relative. What's happening, in relation to the way this game has been handled, how the tablet players have been lied to again and again and how AD4 has been delayed for 4 months, is tragic. It's made worse with people like you who come here and act all tolerant with Obsidian's mistreatment of loyal and paying customers and pretend that their **** doesn't stink. Actually, most "things in this world" aren't relative. Things (nouns) in particular tend to be objectively well-defined. A sizeable number of adjectives are quite subjective, though - tragedy among them. You are absolutely correct in that tragedy is an entirely subjective term. For reference: trag·ic /trajik/ adjective: tragic 1. causing or characterized by extreme distress or sorrow. "the shooting was a tragic accident" suffering extreme distress or sorrow. "the tragic parents reached the end of their tether" 2. of or relating to tragedy in a literary work. If the delay of AD4 causes you extreme distress or sorrow, especially on the scale of a literary tragedy, then you are absolutely justified in describing the delays as tragic. You are, unfortunately, in a poor position to defend your problem as anything less than one of the "first world" variety. An aside: if you'd care to defend your use of the word tragedy as meaning something along the lines of "very bad" due to popular usage, I'd direct you to what the late and esteemed mister George Carlin had to say about popular usage.
  7. Here is my first submission for Contest #2, assuming that we can submit two entries per contest. (If the limit is only one per contest, please remove my Yellow Mold from consideration for the first contest.) Valeros Goes Shopping: An Encounter at the General Store (Inspiration for this story comes from this post on the BoardGameGeek forums - specifically, the part about encountering a Bunyip in the General Store.) The twinkle of a bell announces a customer; Vin Vinder - the local shopkeeper - looks up from his want-ads. Strolling through the aisles is that puffed-up warrior that helped out during the goblin raid at the Swallowtail Festival. Valeric is his name, or something like that. Valentine? Friendly enough, but always so smug and swaggering, this guy. Just a touch condescending, too. "Shopkeep!" intones the warrior. "Shopkeep, I wonder if you could help me out, here." Vin sets his newspaper aside with a grunt. "Aye. What is it?" Smiling knowingly, Valeros fingers the dull edge of a woodsman's axe, hanging from one of the racks. "Shopkeep, I'm -" "Vin." "Excuse me? "My name is Vin. Vin Vinder." Valeros smirks that infuriating smirk of his. "Ah, Vinder! Yeah, that rings a bell. Sorry, old-timer. Valeros. Anyhow - Vin - I'm wondering where it is that you keep the good stuff." Vin scowls. "The... good stuff?" "The good stuff, yeah." The warrior shifts his weight, just a little bit impatiently. Vin sighs. "I don't know what you mean." "Aw, come on old-timer. There's -" "Damn it, my name is Vin. Not 'old-timer.'" "Vin, right! Sorry. Anyway, listen. This is Sandpoint's finest general store, isn't it? At this, Vin Vinder puffs his chest up, a bit. "Indeed it is," he replies. "The best-stocked shop in Sandpoint, and the largest." "Aha," says the warrior, "then you must have some more exotic wares in stock." "Exotic...? I... I mean, we've got a few potio-" "Sure, sure, but, I mean, mattocks and spyglasses and watered-down healing potions are fine and all, but -" "Watered-down!?" "-but you've got to have something a little more exciting in stock somewhere. I mean, look, Vin - old buddy - I'm going out of my mind in this place, you know? Sandpoint is charming and all, but there's just not much to do when it's not under attack by goblins, you know?" Valeros pauses to nudge Vin in the ribs, with a wink. "Except for that one redhead. Shayla something. You know the one!" Vin seethes. "You... you mean Shayliss? Shayliss Vinder?" "Yeah, that's it! Shayliss Vin - oh! Vinder, yeah... yeah... gosh, that's awkward." The warrior barks a hearty peal of laughter. "Now that you mention it, she did say that she was a shopkeeper's daughter. Sorry about that, old-timer. Anyway, what I'm saying is -" And it hits him. Over the course of several long seconds, Vin's seething glare becomes a smug smirk of his own. As it happens, he does have something more exotic in stock. He thought he'd hold out for a buyer from Magnimar - alchemists and wizards could always fathom a use for such things - but maybe this Valeros fellow might like to see it. "I know what you're saying," Vin interrupts. "I've actually got something pretty strange in the back. It might be dangerous, though. It's not the kind of thing I usually sell here, but -" "Strange and dangerous! Now you're talking, old-timer! What is it?" Vin leads Valeros by the elbow toward the back of the store. "Well, I don't exactly know what it is. I bought it from a traveling merchant when it was still a juvenile thing. Kept it in the back here - it's gotten quite large!" The sound of splashing piques Val's interest - what could be splashing around in the backroom at a general store? With a feeble flourish, Vin Vinder draws back the curtain that separates the backroom proper from a smaller alcove. Behind the drape sits a great, iron bathtub... and floundering within it is an aquatic beast the size of a pony! A disturbing combination of shark and seal, the brown-furred creature's face seems to grin, it's mouth filled with razor-sharp teeth. "Cayden's mug! What on earth is that!" "Watch yourself, now," Vin grinned. "The floor tends to get a bit slippery from all the splashing..." With that, Vin gives the warrior the barest nudge toward the tub. Valeros' feet slip and slide beneath him - the warrior losing his balance as he tumbles into the overlarge bathtub! An uproar of splashing and yelling overtakes the backroom, as Vin looks on. "Oh dear," remarks the shopkeeper, as the bunyip and the warrior wrestle and splash. "A KNIFE! OR AN AXE! THROW ME ONE OF THOSE AXES!" bellows Valeros, as the bunyip's gnashing teeth grind and gnaw closer and closer. "Oh, those? Well those are four gold pieces each, and the knives are two apiece." "YEEAAAHHHHGGGH!" Valeros cries, as the bunyip's teeth bite into his shoulder. "Oh, gosh." Vin remarks. "Now, healing potions, those are a hair more costly. Even watered-down as they are. Afraid that'll bring your tab to fifty-six gold pieces." "AAARGH! FINE! WHATEVER THEY COST - JUST GIVE ME AN AXE, OLD MAN!" "Well, these really are a tad dull. But they're all we've got in stock. Now we do sell whetstones, you mind. Sharpen an axe right up, with one of those. Just four silver pieces each..." And so it came to pass that Vin turned a healthy profit on his bunyip, while Valeros paid a hefty price for an evening's dalliance with the shopkeeper's daughter. (And they all lived happily ever after; the end.)
  8. Assuming that we are posting submissions here, Here are my submissions for Contest #1: The Basidirond (from the first Bestiary), a monster with a uniquely obnoxious "before the encounter" rule: (click to view) The Yellow Mold, a barrier that rewards characters for carrying Fire-trait equipment (a job usually reserved for monsters): (click to view)
  9. This. I desperately want this game to live long enough to give me a Skull & Shackles (and the class-specific decks).
  10. This is exactly my fear, and it's why I created the "Health of the Game?" thread. It is not heartening that none of the devs have responded to it, to-date.
  11. You will never be able to skip the check. You will eventually be able to voluntarily FAIL the check - just like in the physical card game. But you're still stuck with difficult "acquire-or-suffer" situations, as is the case with Local Heroes. Being able to SKIP the check would make scenarios like that one trivially easy.
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