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Borissimo

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About Borissimo

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    (4) Theurgist
  1. Oh, I didn't know about that! Thanks Ethics, this is perfect. I'll wait for the patch.
  2. I encountered a pretty bad bug after completing the first scenario of the Goblins DLC. It's preventing me from continuing the game. I'm playing on PC / Steam. After completing the scenario, I received a skill feat, then a card feat. Several of my characters chose to take an extra blessing. In the deck building screen, however, the collection doesn't have any blessings in it, so I can't continue. You can see everything here: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=PGQWeS3XvAg Any workarounds or patches to resolve this would be most appreciated!
  3. I'm personally willing to accept that forces beyond Flounder's control were behind the change. Given that the character alts were $60 on mobile, I'm pretty happy that I got them for $17 through the Ambassador Program, alongside the ability to play on the platform I always wanted to play on in the first place. The free dice (and the ability to buy 6 sets of dice directly for gold instead of trying to get them piecemeal through chests) were a nice bonus.
  4. I purchased the game on Steam and, through the ambassador program, got all of the DLC installed on my computer and successfully linked my iOS account. I can now finish my existing game on PC. Beautiful! I noticed, however, that the legendary dice provided by the "all alts" DLC are not available to me. They don't show up in my collection. When I go to the store in-game, I am given an option to "buy" the set of dice. When I click it, the Steam overlay pops up and puts the "all alts" DLC into the shopping cart. Steam helpfully informs me that I already own this DLC. So, the game knows that I should have the dice, but I don't actually have the dice. In case it helps, here's the order in which I did things: 1) Buy season pass on iOS and play a bunch. 2) Use PFID to generate 10% off coupon for Steam. 3) Follow instructions for activating Ambassador Program. 4) Purchase game on Steam. 5) Enter iOS code onto Steam to link accounts and get all of my save game data from my iPad onto Steam. Of course, this isn't the end of the world, but if anyone has found a workaround or if a solution is incoming, it'd be nice to know. The dice are my favorite purchasable item (and I love that in the Steam version you can buy specific dice with gold! Lord, that would have saved me so much gold on chests ...).
  5. This is the first good response to my original post. Fluoride, you're absolutely right that I overlooked an important factor. As for the posts above Fluoride, they're a rehash of reasons why a player shouldn't ASSUME that a game on one platform must be available on other platforms. And I say again, as I did in the first post here, that there are several galaxies of difference between an ASSUMPTION and an EXPLICIT PROMISE BY DEVELOPERS. I guess my first post was a little long and some people couldn't be bothered to read it. So let me spell it out: A prospective buyer of the game comes along and says, "Hey Obsidian, if I pay $25 to get the content on mobile, will I have to pay again to get the same content on the eventual future PC version?" Obsidian says, "Nope! Buy it once and you have it on all platforms!" Based on this information from Obsidian, the prospective buyer pays $25 to unlock the game on mobile. Now if you don't see how that is a problem, I honestly don't know what else to say.
  6. All right Ethics, I've gotta hand it to you. That is the first truly good argument I've seen in defense of charging for the PC version. My blood, which has been boiling with liquid rage for a few days now, is starting to simmer. Thank you.
  7. EDIT on 6/22/2017: I stand by the feelings that I had at the time I wrote this post, because given the information I had it was reasonable for me to feel the way I did. That being said, while I'm not going to alter the post that follows, I do wish to note that as a result of points brought up here and elsewhere, the developers of this game still have my support and trust. In the Ambassador Program thread, I asked why more people weren't angry about the fact that mobile users have to buy the same game twice to play it on PC. I was shocked when a slew of people answered my question very genuinely and in total defense of Obsidian. "Well, you can't just assume that if you buy the game on one platform you get it for free on another," the chorus went. And that's true. You indeed cannot assume such a thing. But there's a difference between assuming something and being told it is the case multiple times by the developers. Since at least some people here have evidently short memories, let me jog them. Flounder, in this thread: This strongly implies that when the PC version is released, mobile players will not have to pay to buy the game again. I could argue that it isn't ethical for Obsidian to let implications like this stand for months without ever doing anything to dispel them, but I don't need to, because there's also this: Universal, your purchases are tied to your PlayFab account. So there you have it. Obsidian explicitly stated that buying the game once on mobile meant you'd never have to buy it again, and that was untrue. I could have maybe pardoned this untruth if Obsidian didn't try to cover it up with steaming bull dung. As justification for why the Steam version costs money, Obsidian "explained" that the Steam version uses a different pricing structure. This makes it sound as though the issue was completely out of the developers' hands, and that is absolute **cking nonsense. Nobody in 2017 can possibly believe that it is beyond the bounds of current technology to put on Steam a free version of the game that acts as a demo and can be unlocked into a full version via a $25 fee, and then give players who paid $25 on mobile a code that bypasses the lock. In defending their decision to charge for the PC version, Obsidian mumbled out some corporate twaddle that is TRANSPARENTLY BULLSHlT. Giving out such an explanation and expecting it to be accepted as reasonable is insulting to their players. Had Obsidian simply said the truth — "Look guys, the mobile version wasn't as profitable as we'd hoped, so we had to charge for the PC version or it wouldn't have happened at all" — I might have been okay with it. But making a promise, breaking it, and lying about why they broke it is without hyperbole the first really awful thing Obsidian has done during this project. I love the Pathfinder Adventure Card Game and I love Obsidian for making a proper digital version. To me, Pathfinder Adventures is above all an incredible service to fans of the original card game — a service most fans of most adventuring games do not and will never get. Anyone who loves the PACG and wants to play it solo is lucky beyond measure that Obsidian exists and decided to take the project on. My overwhelming gratitude to Obsidian for undertaking this title made me forgive the 100% missed deadline rate, the showstopping bugs, the characters who lost feats for no reason, the cards that disappeared for no reason, the disappearance of quest-mode and the never-existence of multiplayer, the fact that I could only add basics to my deck in AD3, and on and on. Anyone who's watched my playthroughs on YouTube knows that they're a kind of Frankenstein's monster, a writhing mass of bugs and befuddlement stitched together by pure desperation. I don't care that every update had egregious, unforgivable bugs; I don't care that it took Obsidian four freaking months to put out AD4; I don't care that character progress got wiped; I don't care that I had to play Showstopping Bug Whack-a-Mole to finish several scenarios; and, frankly, in the end, I don't care about 18 f***ing dollars. But I do care that a company I love lied to me, lied about why they lied to me, and did so in such a blatantly transparent way that it is clear they either don't respect me or think I'm a god damn idiot. I am angry. You can be angry at the people you love. Obsidian, let's be real for a second. I know that you'll never be able to say this out loud, but we all know that you know that this game's development has been a total sh*t show. I'm sure you talk about this to each other all the time. And you have to know that the fans who've been here since the beginning have given you a lot of pardons that few other game developers will ever be given. So you're going through some hard times and you had to charge for the PC version. I get it. But if you can't spare a little honesty in a trying time for the people who supported you for over a year, defended and stood by you even when your game was a dumpster fire on wheels, then when can you?
  8. I dunno, Ethics, that seems a little rosy to me. The "only" reason? How about this other reason: there is a nonzero probability that it will take Obsidian literally months to implement this ambassador program. It's perfectly reasonable to wait for it to actually appear before committing $18 on a second copy of the same game. In my case, the only reason I'm buying the game on PC at all is that with the ambassador coupon it's actually cheaper to get the alts by re-buying the PC version than by paying the price on mobile. I'm planning to make a legendary play-through with six alts. Now, if Obsidian doesn't put together this ambassador program till ****ing October, then I sure as hell don't want to give them $18 now.
  9. I like the idea of capping cards — it's certainly easier to have the game salvage cards for you than to manually go into your vault and delete some of those 11 Foxes or whatever. I also don't mind legendaries being capped at 1, though I sympathize with players who got used to having bunches of them and are now sad. The problem with this system is that 4 copies of a card is A LOT. Most uncommon cards are not that great, so with this capping system, there will be way, way more crappy cards diluting the pool than anyone who used salvaging would have ever had on mobile. The game should still let players either (1) salvage individual cards, or (2) lower the cap size for uncommon and rare cards.
  10. I like the new capping system, and in fact I wish there was a way to set caps on mobile. But my vote is still a "yes" because MrBishop's post does not address the following: 1) When something is "just salvaged on the back end," do you get gold for it? If not, then you just paid gold to get nothing. 2) A great deal of uncommon cards are junk, and 4 copies is a pretty damn big cap for a card that's junk. Without a way to change the caps yourself or salvage individual cards, your game will become significantly diluted by uncommon cards.
  11. If Obsidian expects us to pony up the cash for a second copy of the same game before the Ambassador "reward" is ready, then the only thing I'm going to have at the ready is my pitchfork.
  12. When I go to the site mentioned in the first post of this thread, I'm still not seeing anything in my account. The Steam sale ends June 22, so the devs have about 2 days to implement this ambassador program before the introductory sale ends.
  13. I'm confused why everyone is so excited about the Ambassador Program. The program just upgrades the base version of the Steam game to a "deluxe" version. You still have to pay $25 (minus discounts) to buy the game on Steam even if you already paid $25 to buy the game on mobile. I mean, am I going crazy here or isn't that ... completely terrible? I was under the impression from the beginning that if you bought the season pass on mobile you'd have it when the game came out for PC. When I went to the Steam page, I was utterly befuddled by the lack of a "download" button. I came to the forums trying to figure out how to link my account to download the game on Steam, and all I found was this "ambassador" nonsense which to me just seems like wool over the eyes of the community. You bought the game on mobile when it first came out. You supported Obsidian while they spent a year working out the kinks on a product en route to releasing the PC version, which is the one that they've probably been hoping all along would be the one that actually makes them money, and when that version arrives, Obsidian says you have to buy the same game again. Why aren't more people mad?
  14. Let me preface this by saying that I absolutely adore Pillars of Eternity. Obsidian did an amazing job (among many other things) improving the player's quality of life, letting you focus on the fun of playing the game rather than fiddling with the inventory. So that being said, I simply do not understand the rationale for the camping supply limit. It would make sense as a measure to prevent rest-spamming if and only if camping supplies were an unlimited resource. But they are not. There is a finite number of them in the world, and there is no merchant that sells an unlimited number. A player who tries to rest-spam will literally run the game out of camping gear. Writing down where all of the camping gear is located so that you can come by later to pick it up after your pack isn't full is exactly the kind of tedious BS that Obsidian did away with in pretty much every other facet of PoE.
  15. Actually, if fighters in PoE are a problem, it's because they didn't follow their D&D legacy. PoE was clearly inspired by the 4th edition of D&D. The "encounter" concept, talents, and the idea of "engagement" all have clear analogues in that edition. Now in 4e, Fighters were an awesome class from day 1 and continued to be one of the funnest classes in the game even after many other classes had been added. Unfortunately, this coolness did not carry over to PoE. A 4e Fighter "marks" any enemy that he attacks, regardless if the attack hits or misses. Marked enemies have an accuracy penalty when attacking anybody other than the fighter, and if a marked enemy does decide to attack someone other than the fighter (and the fighter is in reach), the fighter gets a free attack against it. Furthermore, if an enemy "breaks engagement" with the fighter and the fighter's opportunity attack hits, the enemy stops moving. These mechanics are incredibly simple yet genius, turning the fighter into a credible tank that dishes out good damage and requires a lot of thoughtful play. Why Obsidian didn't borrow some of these ideas is a bit of a mystery, considering the designers clearly had an intimate knowledge of 4e. Perhaps they thought fighters would be good enough without these tanking tools and only hindsight reveals that they weren't. What I learned playing 4e is that "tank" does not have to mean "boring," and while I get that that having a limp turtle who does nothing but cower on the front lines is stupid, I do wish that the concept of tanking were more fully realized in PoE. As it stands, there are only two options for each character: ranged damage-dealer and armor-wearing melee damage dealer.
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