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Goddard

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About Goddard

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    goddard007

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  1. I am planning on working on GemRB and will experiment on that, but conceptually it is not complicated. I will let you know when I get the chance, Mind flayer.
  2. You are taking simulation too literal. We are talking about a fantasy land simulation with magic, monsters, and dark passage ways. What my example is referring to is the most basic of intelligence emulation. I even included a related emulation in preventing theft by having the creatures agro if the player is caught stealing. The lines of distinction are pretty clear. We aren't talking about a physics simulation for the annihilation of a bridge at hurricane speeds. I am saying I could create general intelligence for all creatures in the game. It would just be apart of their m
  3. Ah, that is another topic. Changes to number and statistic aren’t all at exciting in an electronic game, where those calculations are happening “under the hood”. Adding +2 after doing physical roll of dice doesn’t have the same impact when those things are done for you. I think Deadfire made a step in a right direction by unifying a lot of statistics between classes and trying to differentiate them through active abilities. It reminds me of Tim Cain’s talk that was posted a while ago on these forums. An example he gave was shotgun: rather than increasing base damage of a shotgun you can allow
  4. I get it from the standpoint of a business. It reduces the hours for development time. It is much easier to just disable something that has many variables. I don't get it from the stand point of trying to make a truly innovative experience which I really admired about BG. ...... “It’s not the same as a game I played 20 years ago” so it’s not “Innovative”. :-D It’s nothing to do with complexity of design, or creativity or being innovative. It’s just some people don’t like going through checklists before every fight. But we have been through all of that before. It(BG) was
  5. I get it from the standpoint of a business. It reduces the hours for development time. It is much easier to just disable something that has many variables. I don't get it from the stand point of trying to make a truly innovative experience which I really admired about BG.
  6. The idea of eating food before combat is the same as pre-buffing except without the cool magic and visual effects.
  7. Kind of fun to just take out a pencil and draw it as well. The simulation of a real adventure.
  8. When I went through CDL training, part of it was about a week just being taught all the ins-and-outs of how to use a road atlas. There's so much more to it than most people know! Each and every symbol has meaning on those things. If you know what each colored triangle means, what the code is for the interstate numbering system, stuff like that you can plot a detailed course at a glance. I had a bit of experience with that as well when I was young as a traveling salesmen, but then later in geography and surprisingly geology class. Those maps are so very dense and interesting. I was to
  9. I remember playing Zelda in the regular Nintendo days and we created our own maps. In some older D&D/Strategy games you would also keep your own journal. While these things might not be for everyone it would be awfully fun to compare journal notes on the first go'round with a friend. Anyone actually ever used a real map to travel in real life? It is actually pretty easy and fun although when driving solo can be hazardous.
  10. So... if you put gelatin into a "potion," and make it a solid that you could then eat, is it food, or is it a potion? What makes a potion magical and food not-magical, in a world in which magic exists and ingredients/reagents can have magical properties? Also, just FYI, you're sending mixed signals by saying you haven't a care in the world about this, then proceeding to present arguments about it. o_O Being a little too literal with your FYI. You know what he means even if for whatever reason you dislike his opinion.
  11. That was BG2's answer to the problem that the player regularly enters a fight pre-buffed while the NPCs can't, as they only activate their AI routine upon sight (or more precisely, when being in range, leading to exploits like activating them stealthed and letting their buffs run out). For technical reasons, it was difficult to have actual pre-buffing (and still is, seeing how video game AI still works on enemy aggro ranges) so they tried to emulate it to level the playing field and make the encounter more believable: On activation, the enemy mages applied their buffs through scripted insta-c
  12. I feel like people are really attempting to just shut the conversation down by suggesting questioning the game mechanics is toxic, or comparing PoE to D&D is bad, but I am not sure if you guys understand that claiming a game is a spiritual successor and then expecting people not to discuss the game and this game is suppose to have the spirit of and its system is pretty strange. If you have your feelings hurt by this discussion then you don't have to reply. I really just want to discuss the two systems. I am more or less trying to debate not fight. @smjjames yes the original discu
  13. 1. Plenty of surprise elements in combat. BG2 is a prime example. I'd love to play with you and see you beat every encounter on your first try on core D&D rules or better with a legit character. The idea that a person can't get good at a game is pretty lame. 2. In order for you to be prepared, as much in real life where you pack a coat, you would need the spell, a mage, or the like, in order for you to have the petrification buff ready. It makes those things useful. So you think do I sell this protections from petrification, learn it, or use it. Protection against fear is much
  14. Just because everyone jumps off a bridge does that mean you will as well? Well, that implies that pre-buffing is objectivelly better than buffing during combat. Also things change over time. Not nescessarily because some say so but because better ideas are introduced and collectively we decided they are for the best. Yes and I am attempting to objectively look at those changes and talk about them and you are talking about what the crowd is doing, or your personal feelings. That is why I made a list. 1. You don't need to cast all your pre-buffs at every encounter. 2. Removin
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