Jump to content

Thumister

Members
  • Content Count

    7
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

5 Neutral

About Thumister

  • Rank
    (1) Prestidigitator

Profile Information

  • Interests
    Old school RPGs: AD&D, Dark Sun, Mythus, Battletech, Storyteller, Traveller, Babylon-5
  1. I voted yes. If we're missing 3 companions and you need another stretch goal or 2 to round them out, then let's get them funded! I also enjoy the dungeon crawl as much as the next person, but what really caught me off guard in Baldur's Gate was the outdoor exploration which I thought was great. I'd be happy to see additional stretch goals to fund more outdoor areas. The worst thing that happens is that the community feels like it's not worth it and it doesn't get funded - no? I'm really intrigued by the idea that crowdsourcing the funding to the game can allow you to fully realize your ar
  2. Wow - I thought they looked great! I was really impressed by how cool the dynamic lighting and water effects looked vs. [for example] Baldur's Gate. If that's the alpha animation...
  3. Great update! I'm glad you're addressing the engagement issue: it was hugely annoying in the Infinity Engine games.
  4. I always liked the idea that gods exist because people believe in them. The more people that believe in a god, the more powerful that god is. Conversely, when the last believer of a god dies, that god also dies. I wrote an adventure once where one of the story lines revolved around a woman who was trapped in Limbo - between her life and her afterlife. In life, she was a preistess of a [very spiteful] minor god. She betrayed her faith, and her spiteful god killed her lover. To avenge her lover's death she killed herself - suspecting that as one of the last people who remembered this god i
  5. I don't really see where this statement fits into the rest of your post which seemed to root for taking the game in mature and unexpected directions. Yah - sorry - it was late. I started to ramble there towards the end...
  6. I enjoy stories that challenge preconcieved nottions about things (people, ideologies, history, etc.). As a GM, there's nothing I enjoy more than smashing my PCs preconcieved notions about a story elemet. We recently played a Babylon-5 adventure where the PCs had to infiltrate a cell of the Free Mars terrorist organization. They were expecting a bunch of rather stereotypical "crazy terrorists". Instead - I unabashedly ripped off part of the story line from Les Miserable which I knew none of them had seen and they were confronted with a bunch of disorganized college kids who saw themselves
  7. For me; I guess it depends on what you're trying to achieve. I probably most enjoyed the armor system in Mythus where you had "body areas" (chest, armor, head, legs, etc.) and you attached armor to those (curiass, greaves, helmet, etc.). Rather than 1 armor score for a player, you had an armor score for each area that was a total for all the armor on that body area. That was kind of a pain for humans to keep track of on a character record sheet, but something that a computer keeps track of very easily. I don't really feel like the goal needs to be to exactly recreate the feeling of D&D
×
×
  • Create New...