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hiptanaka

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About hiptanaka

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  1. There's definitely no real world argument for navigating via GPS in a fantasy game, though. The thing I don't get about this conversation is that there's literally nothing to lose for the people who like to use the quest compass. There's only something to gain for those who would rather turn it off. I don't see why anyone would be against that.
  2. Seems you skimmed rather than read those four pages. The problem, as repeated a few times in this thread, is when the game design doesn't support turning off the quest compass. (Even if there is an actual option for it, which yes, there usually is.) You should've kept watching. Later in the video he brings up another quest in The Witcher 3 that doesn't give you any directions, and he also highlights the fact that there are no printed names on the map, no road signs to read, or any other means to navigate, except for, well, using the quest compass and/or the dotted line. It's fine if you don't think of it as a problem, but please don't dismiss the arguments after ignoring half of what's being said.
  3. Again, I think it's good that the quest compass exists. I'm just saying the game should at least try to give me the information I need to make progress without the quest compass. The problem in my example from Dishonored is that the game didn't even tell me to "go into the kitchen", as it were. If it would've said "put the body in the container outside, below the window to the conference room" I would've been perfectly happy. Or alternatively, the quest could've been designed to allow me to put the body in any container in the vicinity. If I still can't figure it out, it's good to have the quest compass, but at least the game gave me a chance.
  4. Well, yes. But for that to work well the game must be designed so that you can figure out stuff without the quest compass. That was the whole point of this thread. Nobody asked for the complete removal of the quest compass. Let me give you an example from Dishonored. It was mostly playable without the quest compass, but at one point in an early mission, an objective was to hide an unconscious person "in a safe place", or something along those lines. I tried a bunch of things, like just putting him in a dark location outside, and putting him in various containers in the level. Finally I gave up and turned on the quest compass. It turns out the game wanted me to put him in a specific container identical to many others, but I had been given no pointers as to which one it was or why that one was better. When they designed the game, the probably didn't even think of this because they designed it with the assumption that the player has the quest compass to guide them. There are examples like this everywhere, like in The Witcher 3 or the modern Fallouts, where using the quest compass is the only reasonable way to find the solution.
  5. I dusted off this account just to agree with the OP. When a game is designed with the assumption that the player is using the quest compass, the quests usually become unsolvable if it's turned off. If the player magically learns the exact location of the next objective, there is no need for an NPC to give proper pointers to it. I find it a lot more immersive to turn off the quest compass and navigate by landmarks, hints, etc, but it demands the game is designed to be playable like that. Here is a great video that explains the concept in more detail: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FzOCkXsyIqo I assume there's little room for big changes in TOW at this point, but it would be great if they designed the game with these points in mind from the get-go. If not, then the sequel.
  6. Thanks for the input. I think I will try a cipher as my first character.
  7. Thanks for the guide, it had some useful pointers. I have a question regarding the role weapons play for the different classes. I'm assuming the weapon is an important part of the damage output for a fighter or a rogue, but what about more caster-type classes that still use weapons, like the cipher? Do abilities use weapon damage as a base, or is the weapon largely unimportant? I understand a cipher has to attack in order to charge his/her abilities, but as far as I understand the spells are what makes the class a heavy hitter. More generally, which classes should I consider if I want weapons be an important part of my build, but still enjoy spell casting?
  8. Yes, simply because I wouldn't want to interfere with their vision of the game and world, and Tim Cain already said it will have guns. I trust them to make a great game, from what I've heard so far.
  9. Very nice! Glad to hear Tim Cain is working on the game system. Everything about this game sounds great.
  10. I love everything I see here. You're on the right track, I can tell! Also, the attached concept art is very refreshing. It's great to see something that's not simultaneously ridiculously exaggerated and comical, like so many other games these days. This is believable, different, and seemingly made to fit into a coherent whole rather than just look cool (even thought it does that, too).
  11. Fully translating a (presumably) dialog heavy game with partial voice acting such as this sounds expensive. I'd rather see that money put elsewhere, actually. Not necessarily into player housing, though.
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