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The whole problem with resting is that the discussion is taken completely out of context. The issue isn't 'resting' per se, the issue is whether or not you want to have meaningful mid-term / long-term resource management or do you want the player to be at full power before every single encounter. That is the core question the devs should ask, and then build the character system around those goals instead of starting with the details and hoping that the end product will resemble something. This isn't a 'choice' vs 'no choice' issue either, as there is balance to consider.

 

They should pick a goal, design with that goal in mind and stick to it instead of having this ridiculous back-and-forth with largely meaningless details. When you have a clear goal you can ask productive questions, such as "does this design serve the goal we have", and "are there other ways to accomplish this", and even "is this feature even necessary to achieve our goal". The feeling I get from the deadfire project is that no one has a clear picture about what they are trying to do and why, which is why I'm still very sceptical about the whole game. The first game suffered very much from the same symptoms, but the situation wasn't bad enough to spoil the experience completely, which is why I don't regret buying it.

 

True excellence requires leadership, not 'communication' and 'compromise' and 'talking'. Of course good leadership needs feedback, but it also requires a strong vision. When the vision isn't clear, the end product suffers, and where there's no clear and efficient leadership, the vision gets muddied under a thousand different voices and interpretations. To quote my favorite bad guys, 'One Vision, One Purpose'.

 

EDIT: what I mean with meaningless details is that without a clear vision the details are completely without context and thus there is absolutely no way to determine whether they serve the purpose of the vision or not.

Edited by Ninjamestari
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The most important step you take in your life is the next one.

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Guest Blutwurstritter

 

I guess i'm in the minority but i like time limits and always thought it is severely underused especially in games with resting mechanics. Fallout 1 and Fallout 2 had quests with time limits, which worked out well. I like time limits since it is a "hard" resource which you can't bypass and actually forces you to adapt. I am not arguing for time limits in Pillars since i don't think they would enhance the game as it is and resource management is only a very minor aspect of the game.

 

Time limits are the enemy of exploration. It just takes away an important element of the game, as I always feel like I have to blow through the plot without looking around. FO1 felt like that -- I couldn't just go randomly off somewhere, but had to constantly stay on mission. For me that ruined the experience, so I prefer to play it with the mod version that eliminates the time limit.

 

They could add time limits as a game option, with a default of off, but then they would need to include failure consequences.

 

The time limit then did exactly what it was designed to do, keeping you on track. And in the case of Fallout 1 the the resource management was a more important aspect than the free exploration. I agree that it was a pretty harsh time limit before the patch but in the patched version after the initial quest of getting the water chip you could explore as much as you liked. I think after the patch you had over a decade ingame time befor the mutants destroyed everything.

Like i said, i dont think Pillars should use time limits since it was never designed for this, i only mentioned it since it is a possibility to prevent sleep scumming and to introduce other aspects in game mechanics.

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The whole problem with resting is that the discussion is taken completely out of context. The issue isn't 'resting' per se, the issue is whether or not you want to have meaningful mid-term / long-term resource management or do you want the player to be at full power before every single encounter. That is the core question the devs should ask, and then build the character system around those goals instead of starting with the details and hoping that the end product will resemble something. This isn't a 'choice' vs 'no choice' issue either, as there is balance to consider.

 

More or less. If they want any kind of meaningful sense of scarcity, attrition, resource management, the dungeon as an intimidating space, then some kind of restriction on restoring player power is necessary. If they want to instead offer a frustration-free experience where you blast enemies with cool spells that replenish whenever you like, then just get rid of camping supplies and whatnot. 

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