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Nathaniel Chapman

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About Nathaniel Chapman

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    Obsidian VIP

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    mission viejo
  • Xbox Gamertag
    pedrothedagger

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  1. Sozzy looks awesome. Best contribution to these forums from Volourn EVER and anyone who says otherwise is A LIAR. Such a high bar!
  2. If you think being funny will lead Volourn to forgive you know that it won't. Also know that it is spelled sozzy not "Soz-ey", r00fles! yeah but sozzy just looks... wrong. Also, I mean, if I was looking for forgiveness from people on the internet I would be a sad, sad human being. I REGRET NOTHINGGGGG
  3. as one of the designers who worked on SoZ I am chiming in unhelpfully to say that "SoZ-ey" is my favorite adjective. that's all. also you guys are being kind of nutty about BETRAYAL involving people changing jobs in the game industry. Sometimes people make life decisions for personal reasons or professional reasons that extend beyond moustache twirling?
  4. AAAAActually, that's not really entirely true. While I definitely played quite a bit of X-Men Legends (as a tester) we didn't really look that much at the Marvel games as an influence for DS3. The bigger influences on the combat actually WERE games like Devil May Cry and Ninja Gaiden. Our dodge mechanic was pretty much straight from NG, and aspects of DMC inspired early thinking about the ability system. Obviously the other big influence was games like D2, WoW, etc.on the more stat-y/ability/levelup progression side of things. There were some other odd influences (Demon's Souls, ICO and Le
  5. Again, D3 is a traditional client/server game. It's not a matter of being "halfway" - services like Gaikai are OnLive are pretty fundamentally different technologically. Which isn't to say that they can't be successful, but it's a very, very different process and requires an even greater level of network reliability. There's a lot less ability for a client to "smooth over" rough patches in a connection when the client is doing literally none of the simulation/rendering.
  6. This is why I thought cloud gaming had an upper hand. It doesn't require maintenance from the user side, who indeed, need to invest on their connections, though. The companies can collect user data more freely since it is the user who is allowed to use their servers. This solves most part of the "piracy" issues, too, - A better control on IP form the greedy IP holders. ...Well, at least, it seems the distribution, or more precisely, the service has a certain advantages for both publishers and the users. Then, again, this is just a view from a gamer, who doesn't have any inside-industry ex
  7. This is why I thought cloud gaming had an upper hand. It doesn't require maintenance from the user side, who indeed, need to invest on their connections, though. The companies can collect user data more freely since it is the user who is allowed to use their servers. This solves most part of the "piracy" issues, too, - A better control on IP form the greedy IP holders. ...Well, at least, it seems the distribution, or more precisely, the service has a certain advantages for both publishers and the users. Then, again, this is just a view from a gamer, who doesn't have any inside-industry ex
  8. The PC gaming market is plenty healthy. The current console generation is probably reaching market saturation, especially at the current price levels, I'd guess. I don't know many folks (then again I mostly know gamers, so...) who would buy a 360 but haven't yet. From my knowledge: games can lose plenty of money on consoles and they can lose plenty of money on PC. They can also make money on both platforms. Cross-platform games tend to do better on consoles, however 1) PC development is substantially easier and thus generally cheaper and 2) there are some types of games that are not feasib
  9. In regards to the hit/flop mentality, I'm curious why a publisher would even fund a project they forecast will "flop". Financially speaking, what's the point in even allocating funds for a project if they don't think it will sell well, or at all? Or is it a case of them sinking as little as possible in the off chance that it will actually make money? Sort of a low risk investment that could pay off? Note that flop doesn't mean financially unsuccessful, it just means non-huge sales. In practicality, it means they limit their risk by investing as little as possible, targeting a cert
  10. It's not that publishers don't care about quality, per se. It's more that, for AAA development, it's a hit/flop mentality. If a publisher thinks something will be a hit, they will sink a ton of money into it and try to make it as good as they can. If they don't, the assumption is it will be a "flop" (meaning not sell millions) and they'll try to get it out as cheaply as possible to recoup losses or make a modest profit. The biggest problems with this are that players pay the same price for both kinds of games, and feel cheated when they get a game that a publisher hasn't invested enoug
  11. Cancelled games are always better than released ones You said that Obsidian was gonna knock it out the park or whatever the idiom was! And now you're retracting it! I feel betrayed! P.S. : To be less ironic, as much as Morgoth likes to troll, I think there's a point. Dungeon Siege 3 and South Park don't really seem to be the kind of projects Obsidian's audience expects. I guess that's just fair, since Obsidian's fans alone don't really make it financially viable for the company to survive, and I have high hopes for South Park (Dungeon Siege III has been treated fairly harshly, but
  12. Cancelled games are always better than released ones
  13. ... How do you know that Vermont and Aliens weren't "utter nonsense"?
  14. I appreciate the (mostly!) warm regards. And I know to ignore Morgoth as he's trollin' much of the time The reality is if working for Obsidian wasn't great I wouldn't have stayed for almost 7 years. That's quite a while in game industry dog years. And, since I personally know that OEI has kick-butt projects coming out and awesome people to make them, I'm not exactly worried about the future for them.
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