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hamskii

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About hamskii

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  1. By the way, as I'm sure you've all seen by now, a new version of the PnP guide is available at https://eternity.obsidian.net.
  2. Erm. In a TT RPG one can be whatever one wants to be, and can literally do whatever one wants to do, imagination the only limitation. Railroading is like vampires. It sucks. Depends on the story that they're playing, surely? If there's a god rampaging around the game setting and the player doesn't intervene, then it makes sense that bad stuff would happen. Imo Eothas' Challenge isn't so much railroading as it is another resource management challenge.
  3. With Magran's Fires and the advent of turn-based combat, it is now possible to customise the gameplay to create a much more simulative experience. This thread is about discussing the combination of NG+ options that come closest to providing a tabletop RPG-like gameplay experience. Things I'm pretty certain about are: Turn-based mode: of course. Eothas' Challenge: creates a sense of urgency implied by the narrative but not previously reflected in gameplay, and forces players to plan and prioritise rather than swanning about every corner of the map, much like they would in a tabletop RPG. Abydon's Challenge: equipment maintenance is a part of many tabletop RPGs, but can be tedious for the GM to track. One of the advantage of video games is that this complexity and tedium can be handled by the game engine. Skaen's Challenge: makes light sources a necessary part of adventuring, as they are in many tabletop RPGs. Rymyrgand's Challenge: for much the same reasons as Abydon's Challenge. Woedica's Challenge: combined with Eothas' Challenge and Rymyrgand's Challenge, it turns resting into a careful game of resource management. And of course, resource management, particularly with spells (not so much abilities) is an important part of most TT RPGs. Trial of Iron: no do-overs on the tabletop, I'm afraid. Classic Difficulty: enemies' stats are enemies' stats, and enemy composition is designed around a balanced gameplay experience. I think Relaxed or Veteran also probably fall into the range of difficulties allowable by this, as although they artificially change enemy composition they don't give them stat buffs or debuffs. No Level Scaling Things I'm not so certain about (would be interested to hear peoples' opinions on these): Expert Mode: I guess it's a question of how tough your GM typically is. Do they let players sit and calculate effect radius so that they can avoid friendly fire? If not, then Expert Mode probably needs to be on as well. But given that tabletop is new, it's much more frustrating having it on. Berath's Challenge: This simulates the "bleeding out" mechanic of a lot of tabletop RPGs, but given that there is no way to mitigate this, it might be overly punishing, particularly when combined with Woedica's Challenge. Magran's Challenge: A common houserule is for players to have only a few seconds to decide their action. In practice, Magran's Challenge gives you less time than that, because you have to wait for your move action to complete before you can take another action. Also, you have to decide what to do for a whole party of characters instead of just your own, so the pace is much more frantic than it would be on the tabletop. Has anybody else tried a playthrough in "tabletop mode"? What settings did you use? What did you think?
  4. With Magran's Fires and the advent of turn-based combat, it is now possible to customise the gameplay to create a much more simulative experience. This thread is about discussing the combination of NG+ options that come closest to providing a tabletop RPG-like gameplay experience. Things I'm pretty certain about are: Turn-based mode: of course. Eothas' Challenge: creates a sense of urgency implied by the narrative but not previously reflected in gameplay, and forces players to plan and prioritise rather than swanning about every corner of the map, much like they would in a tabletop RPG. Abydon's Challenge: equipment maintenance is a part of many tabletop RPGs, but can be tedious for the GM to track. One of the advantage of video games is that this complexity and tedium can be handled by the game engine. Skaen's Challenge: makes light sources a necessary part of adventuring, as they are in many tabletop RPGs. Rymyrgand's Challenge: for much the same reasons as Abydon's Challenge. Woedica's Challenge: of course. Combined with Eothas' Challenge and Rymyrgand's Challenge, it turns resting into a careful game of resource management. Trial of Iron: no do-overs on the tabletop, I'm afraid. Classic Difficulty: enemies' stats are enemies' stats, and enemy composition is designed around a balanced gameplay experience. I think Relaxed or Veteran also probably fall into the range of difficulties allowable by this, as although they artificially change enemy composition they don't give them stat buffs or debuffs. No Level Scaling Things I'm not so certain about (would be interested to hear peoples' opinions on these): Expert Mode: I guess it's a question of how tough your GM typically is. Do they let players sit and calculate effect radius so that they can avoid friendly fire? If not, then Expert Mode probably needs to be on as well. But given that tabletop is new, it's much more frustrating having it on. Berath's Challenge: This simulates the "bleeding out" mechanic of a lot of tabletop RPGs, but given that there is no way to mitigate this, it might be overly punishing, particularly when combined with Woedica's Challenge. Magran's Challenge: A common houserule is for players to have only a few seconds to decide their action. In practice, Magran's Challenge gives you less time than that, because you have to wait for your move action to complete before you can take another action. Also, you have to decide what to do for a whole party of characters instead of just your own, so the pace is much more frantic than it would be on the tabletop. Has anybody else tried a playthrough in "tabletop mode"? What settings did you use? What did you think? EDIT: I had meant to post this in General Discussion rather than Technical Support
  5. Is there any way of extracting the gorgeous concept art from the bestiary (ideally in a transparent format!), other than laboriously going through, screenshotting it and then Photoshopping out the background? Or does anybody know if this has already been done elsewhere?
  6. Digging through the game files, it seems that there are a few new morsels of interactivity in the base game when the DLC is installed. The biggest one, which seemingly doesn't even relate to the DLC, is added reactivity for sidekicks when you take them to Ukaizo. I'd post them here, but unless someone really wants to see them here I think it's best for them to be discovered in game. In particular,
  7. I was running 4.0, but it seems that I didn't have the problem after all - I just didn't spot the new staircase in the Hall of the Unseen. Went right to the centre and totally missed it
  8. Sorry, I was looking in the wrong save game folder!! Here's one that I'm pretty sure is from yesterday: http://www.filedropper.com/wulfrun3edbc526-1aa6-4f05-9ea3-64b42f8dc292lax-12abcdefquicksave
  9. I'm having the same problem. The scripted interaction with isn't triggering, which is stopping me from starting the DLC. I have reported it as a bug here.
  10. So I installed the DLC as soon as it arrived yesterday, sailed around a bit (I'm at 20th level), got a scripted interaction about a giant earthquake, received a letter about the Critter Crusher (or whatever it's called!), and then...nothing. Sailed around some more, sailed to The Black Isles (which is now covered in tentacles that yield kith meat when harvested), entered the Hall of the Unseen, found my way to the centre, and everything is the same as it was. I tried restarting Steam, and that didn't work. Then I tried unticking The Forgotten Sanctum box, restarting Steam, ticking the box, waiting for it to download, and opening the game. The DLC buttons in the bottom left corner of the main menu said The Forgotten Sanctum was installed, I loaded my save and...nothing. Then I tried loading an earlier save and had exactly the same problem as earlier. This morning, I tried again - unticked *all* DLC boxes, waited for them to turn grey, ticked them all again, restarted Steam, waited for them to all turn white, launched the game, and...same experience again. The fact that I appear to be getting some but not of the DLC content has led me to believe that my problem is not the same as this one, where the DLC isn't installing for Season Pass users. I think mine is a different bug where the scripted interaction with Llengrath never triggers. I have attached my savegame in case it's useful for debugging. Wulfrun (8ebba82c-325c-493a-856a-ced1f38c4444) autosave_2.savegame.zip
  11. No staircase that I can see. Just went to talk to Arkemyr as well, and he didn't have anything new to say,
  12. So I installed the DLC as soon as it arrived yesterday, sailed around a bit (I'm at 20th level), got a scripted interaction about a giant earthquake, received a letter about the Critter Crusher (or whatever it's called!), and then...nothing. Sailed around some more, sailed to The Black Isles (which is now covered in tentacles that yield kith meat when harvested), entered the Hall of the Unseen, found my way to the centre, and everything is the same as it was. I tried restarting Steam, and that didn't work. Then I tried unticking The Forgotten Sanctum box, restarting Steam, ticking the box, waiting for it to download, and opening the game. The DLC buttons in the bottom left corner of the main menu said The Forgotten Sanctum was installed, I loaded my save and...nothing. Then I tried loading an earlier save and had exactly the same problem as earlier. This morning, I tried again - unticked *all* DLC boxes, waited for them to turn grey, ticked them all again, restarted Steam, waited for them to all turn white, launched the game, and...same experience again. The fact that I appear to be getting some but not of the DLC content has led me to believe that my problem is not the same as this one, where the DLC isn't installing for Season Pass users. I think mine is a different bug where the scripted interaction with Llengrath never triggers. I have attached my savegame in case it's useful for debugging. Wulfrun (8ebba82c-325c-493a-856a-ced1f38c4444) autosave_2.savegame.zip
  13. Yes! Josh has responded to some constructive criticism of the TTRPG which some people might find interesting. Internal playtesting is underway and Josh hopes to have a new revision out by the end of the year. Finally, here's a preview of the enchantment rules.
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