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Troy4747

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About Troy4747

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  1. I'm afraid you missed the point of this discussion. They all work and put energy into their product because it will bring them money and they most likely enjoy doing it as well. Good for them. What more should I do? paying the money as a customer is not good enough according to you? Should I send them a letter? Should I beta test it? What is enough for a customer to do? They advertise the game as a finished product and yet it is not. Someone made the decision to ship the game knowing full well it's bugged, unbalanced, having a backlog of things yet to publish and I am protesting about it. There were more options to go for. They could have announced open beta for a period of time. Your op says you're offended because a stacking bug made the game more easy than it was designed to be. And you're offended as a result? If I buy a ticket to a horror movie, am I entitled to be offended if it wasn't scary enough, or if it was too scary? There's no guarantee you'll be entertained, or your personal measure of what is 'difficult enough' will be satisfied. Having personally solo'd Baldur's gate trilogy, etc., I don't know how you can claim this game isn't more difficult than those classics were. Regardless, offended? Pick a new word. Is it really offensive to you? If so, you're too easily offended. Even as is, game is better than most other rpg's, and the writing is outstanding. I think paying money does entitle one to expect a working product, so the bugs as to performance/quest breaking etc., I think are of a more serious nature. But offended because the game was easier than you thought it should be on your first play through? Again, give me a break. Last, if you think people get into the game development industry to make money, re-think that. Your don't get it do you ? It works like this. They know game is unfinished and buggy. They release it anyway and pretend it is finished so that people spend $. I buy it. I play it. I beta test for them unwillingly. I find this offensive. If buy a bike I want to ride it NOW. Not in 2 weeks not in 3 months now. I know there is a lot good things about this game but this topic is not about it. It is about simple honesty in game industry these days. But: 1) No one made you buy this game, or buy it now, nor have I seen any promise by Obsidian that this game is bug free. There are news stories pointing out these bugs, and Obsidian has a very old reputation for releasing buggy games. 2) There are return policies if you're so truly offended. Get your money back and go somewhere else. 3) Products are released with bugs all the time. Cars, strollers, games, etc. Recalls, firmware upgrades, software patches, security updates, etc. Several AAA console games released last fall were fundamentally broken. 4) They've released a patch in week 1 that fixed the biggest bugs....so have some patience. 5) Again, I doubt you'd say this stuff to Feargus Urquhart or any other Obsidian employee's face. 6) The game design itself is not poor or fundamentally broken. This is not Rome 2. But for a few minor (now fixed) bugs, Pillars is a very polished product with very intelligent design decisions and excellent writing. Say what you will critically about its style, plots, etc., but this is clearly an above average game made by people who are very skilled at their craft. Internet trolls.
  2. I'm afraid you missed the point of this discussion. They all work and put energy into their product because it will bring them money and they most likely enjoy doing it as well. Good for them. What more should I do? paying the money as a customer is not good enough according to you? Should I send them a letter? Should I beta test it? What is enough for a customer to do? They advertise the game as a finished product and yet it is not. Someone made the decision to ship the game knowing full well it's bugged, unbalanced, having a backlog of things yet to publish and I am protesting about it. There were more options to go for. They could have announced open beta for a period of time. Your op says you're offended because a stacking bug made the game more easy than it was designed to be. And you're offended as a result? If I buy a ticket to a horror movie, am I entitled to be offended if it wasn't scary enough, or if it was too scary? There's no guarantee you'll be entertained, or your personal measure of what is 'difficult enough' will be satisfied. Having personally solo'd Baldur's gate trilogy, etc., I don't know how you can claim this game isn't more difficult than those classics were. Regardless, offended? Pick a new word. Is it really offensive to you? If so, you're too easily offended. Even as is, game is better than most other rpg's, and the writing is outstanding. I think paying money does entitle one to expect a working product, so the bugs as to performance/quest breaking etc., I think are of a more serious nature. But offended because the game was easier than you thought it should be on your first play through? Again, give me a break. Last, if you think people get into the game development industry to make money, re-think that.
  3. This is why internet posts/forums tend be terrible. I highly doubt you'd say such a rant to any of the developers if you met them in person. Put yourselves in their shoes. You worked on a project for years, and now because of a few (admittedly frustrating bugs), you have some fan who did nothing more than put some of his money down say he's offended and crap all over the years of work, energy, and creativity you and all your co-workers/friends put into this product...all for his benefit. I understand being disappointed. Having waited so long for a sequel to the fallout/bg/icewind dale/torment classics, which I consider this game to be, it's frustrating that the gameplay experience in the first week has been sullied by bugs and performance issues. But just as I played those games countless times, I'll replay this game too. They're working on a patch, and have plans for further patches (turn based mode in 1.10). So some disappointment/frustration about having to wait a bit more to get a more bugfree experience, sure. But offended? Give me a break.
  4. Is there a way to disable autosaving before each area transition? Autosaving seems to be the source of massively increasing area transition/loading times.
  5. Description: Area load and game save times have increased steadily and dramatically starting around act 2. I began noticing this around the start of Act II, i.e. after my arrival to the first main city. The game ran very well, with areas loading in 5 seconds or less for all of Act 1, 10+ hours of gameplay. Now loading an area typically takes 30 seconds to a minute, with a fair amount of that time spent on a black screen before the 'loading' screen shows up. It takes this long regardless of area size, so an inn or single room area takes as long as a big outdoor area. This significantly degrades the game experience when quests call for you to run quickly between areas. Note I tried installing the IE mod to change the setting so that the game autosaves before area load, rather than after, didn't solve this. I think the problem is some form of memory leak or decay causing save file/process to increase. Steps to Reproduce the Issue: Play a regular game (steam copy), get a full party (haven't tested this playing solo) and head into Act II. Important Files: Dropbox to save game: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1803465/32e9f5c477f7409fa1150c4a264d4607%209365365%20Sanitarium.savegame Output Log Dropbox (uploader doesn't work): https://www.dropbox.com/s/7d87j3zsikthkhw/output_log.txt?dl=0 System Specs Dropbox link to dxdiag: https://www.dropbox.com/s/pqcnbjx7dkm82tt/dxdiag.txt?dl=0 Screenshots I found this post discussing a similar and/or potentially the same problem: http://forums.obsidian.net/topic/72764-quick-saving-and-loading-times-increased-greatly-after-20-hours/
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