Jump to content

Welcome to Obsidian Forum Community
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Why do some people/reviewers dislike the story of Pillars so much.

story plot deadfire pillarsofeternity

  • Please log in to reply
160 replies to this topic

#41
DarthWhite

DarthWhite

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 20 posts

Oh my. An interesting point, I can relate to that with both POE and POEII. Must say I do enjoy Deadfire itself very much, but the story... it does have problems im my opinion, yes.

 

First I'd like to mention, "dry" and "boring" don't make any story bad for everyone. Remember your books written by classics. Many of them are slow-paced, overly detailed, filled with unnesessary descriptions... but they are still considered great. Because they are. They just don't usually strike you as stories you'd fall for instantly and forget to eat and sleep while dwelling into them.

Now what makes an RPG plot catch your attention? When it feels personal. When it's feeled with emotions, when you can easily relate to what your character does. Look at POE2 for example. A God had awoken right in your house and killed everyone you knew there. Good. I mean quite personal, yes. But hey - you don't see it yourself, you are just told about that ((12) Mage made a great point about hearing vs expiriencing). You are given no chance to feel the loss or anger. In the next 30 minutes you speak with another God that gives you "mission", find out that you have a ship for some reason, fight with pirates, explore caves, travel to some town and are basically overwhelmed by info about world, races, fractions and so-very-important local sidequests. And that's what POE is all about. Can you relate? What emotions did you experince? Most likely you are taken away by all the small problems and gameplay itself. That's exactly what "dry story" means.

Compare it to Baldur's Gate 2 where you wake up in the cage, are tortured, watch some of your friends die and meet with the powerfull enemy face to face for the first few hours of the game. Compare it to NWN2 (which I really consider the best Obsidian game even now :)) where you first make relationships with your foster father and some village folk and then see them almost-killed by brutal attackers who try to get some strange artifact which you are now are asked to hide... If you don't like "they killed my relatives!" beginig, try remembering Planescape: Torment, DAO... all that games start with YOUR feelings, your motivation and your very personal quest. That's what's not boring. That's what makes game feel closer to you.

 

On a side note :)

 

Where as a relatively simplistic story like in the Divinity OS games does not seem to be getting this kind of response (and I am not bashing those games I loved those too). 

Are you sure? Oo Because if you look at steam revievs I think you'll find that every fifth or them or so says that Divinity OS plot is the worst part of the game :) Even the positive ones :) It has the same problems actually but just... on another level. Makes all POE story problems look small in comparison x)


  • Varana, illathid, LuccA and 2 others like this

#42
Varana

Varana

    (5) Thaumaturgist

  • Members
  • 480 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer
  • Black Isle Bastard!
The problem with that "losing your mind" thing, though, is that it doesn't seem too severe, or even mildly irritating to you. BG2 at least had a few cutscenes with the Slayer but essentially, suffered from a similar issue.
Luckily, BG2 had Imoen, and PoE1 had the Hollowborn - so you could use them as secondary motivation while the game failed to make the primary one seem urgent.
But while both purposes coincided in BG2, in PoE1 it's not readily apparent that both are connected. Even if you wanted to solve the Hollowborn problem, you only charge after Thaos because it's the only thing the game offers, until you do certain quests in Defiance Bay.
That's (one aspect of) what people mean with "telling not showing": You don't _experience_ your Watcher problems, and growing insanity. You are being told that it's really bad and you should do something about it but it never seems to actually affect you. That disconnect is, imho, one core problem with the storytelling, and many other problems are a result of it.
Also, the info dumps - Lady Webb but also the anti-Thaos girl (don't remember the name) right before the end. Much of what you find out about the whole story is told to you at very few points during the main quest. It's not that the story in itself is bad - it is not, on the contrary, I think the general idea behind it is very interesting - but that the pacing is quite off, and makes the story shine a lot duller than it could've been.
That the main quest is only loosely connected to the rest of the quests, doesn't bother me at all. I'm a fan of the Bethesda approach to main quests - point the player in its general direction but if they don't care about it, that's entirely fine. :D

The urgency problem ("why am I saving a kitten in a tree while I'm the Chosen One to fight the world-destroying bad guy?") - yes, that's a very common issue, and very hard to write around. The main difference is how good you can hide that dilemma, mostly.
  • Fluffle, illathid, Xyron and 2 others like this

#43
Jayngo

Jayngo

    (4) Theurgist

  • Members
  • 278 posts
  • Deadfire Silver Backer
  • Fig Backer

I have to admit, the story/world building in Pillars is not my favorite, when compared to Baldur's Gate/Icewind Dale. I give Obsidian full marks for creating their own world from the ground up. That's no small task.

 

I think for me, I'm not crazy about how heavy the story depends on multiple god's and the whole reincarnation thing. It's just too much heaviness. I will say, Deadfire seems better, even though there appears to be more god stuff than PoE had so far. I love the idea of this big statue walking through the islands and you are giving chase. Cool concept. I think having the key words able to hover over, like in Tyranny helps a lot. Almost like a cheat sheet or cliff notes on the spot.

 

With regard to characters and character building, I really love Eder and Aloth. I also like the rogue animated robot from WM (forget her name currently). Other than that, the other characters were just ok.

 

Typically, I play CRPG's for the story and character development first, then leveling aspect, then combat, in that order. Even though I don't generally like the PoE world as much as say, D&D, it's still really fun and usually intriguing. Plus, the nostalgia factor of playing new CRPG's has not and will not wear off on me!



#44
No idea

No idea

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 47 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer

That just tells you what these people know. 
 
A slow start is actually perfect for an RPG because it allows the player to build up his character. Remember the exchange with Calisca in PoE1? That's the sort of things that help flesh out a character and make him or her a little more than some numbers on the character screen. 
 
With that being said I still think PoE1 did a poor job introducing its setting. There is just too much information when you're getting started and it can only be overwhelming. 
 
I can't really say how Deadfire's introduction would feel to someone who hasn't played the first game but I think it's following the same pattern mostly. Having played the first game makes things much less confusing though. 
 
IMO the problem is not that the story is bad, it's more about those people not wanting to invest in the story. Perhaps they feel the path to be taken is not obvious enough. Maybe they want dragons to show up right after character creation just like in Skyrim (which is absolutely terrible and something no self respecting Game Master would do in a pen and paper RPG). Frankly I don't really know. I'm just glad we still get the opportunity to play games that provide a "slow" start.


Cant say about poe 2 but I liked the poe 1 history quite a lot. Rich and original, imo. However, I also think that it was too much lore at the begining. It felt a bit overwhelming. I started to really enjoy the lore in my sedond run, when I knew what the lore was about and could make more sense of it and not having to "memorize it" to find out what was all about.
  • dukeisaac, peko and gloomseeker like this

#45
sucinum

sucinum

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 37 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer

It's not that the story in itself is bad - it is not, on the contrary, I think the general idea behind it is very interesting - but that the pacing is quite off, and makes the story shine a lot duller than it could've been.
[...]

The urgency problem ("why am I saving a kitten in a tree while I'm the Chosen One to fight the world-destroying bad guy?") - yes, that's a very common issue, and very hard to write around. The main difference is how good you can hide that dilemma, mostly.

 

Sorry for cutting your post into two sentences. I think that is the same problem. The background story is great, but it doesn't really unfold and also doesn't really connect to the personal story.

 

How about this setup for PoE2: You have Caed Nua and stuff, everything fine, and then decide to go seafaring to solve whatever threads PoE has left open. A little quest or two, maybe an introduction to seafaring and then, boom, storm, stranded on beginner island. You do sidequests, repair your ship, get staff etc and set sail home to Caed Nua, only to find it devastated. You get some leads, Berath tells you stuff (basically the intro) and find out that the storm almost sinking your ship is connected to the devastation of Caed Nua. End of Act 1 (or probably 0), THEN you go charging for Eothas. You could even introduce a NPC (Serafen probably) who gets lost somewhere in between that and you recover him again.

 

It's almost the same start, but now your motivation is actually in the game and not some flashback. The sense of urgency is introduced later, after giving the player a proper tutorial and introduction. As it is now, there is too much tiny stuff to do, contradicting the epic story. Maybe the game is better the 2nd time you play it, when you don't have to find your way around.


  • LuccA likes this

#46
gloomseeker

gloomseeker

    (3) Conjurer

  • Members
  • 167 posts

I guess, as I said I am not saying their aren't issues with this story and I get having problems with the way it's presented too. I just find issues in so many games it sometimes seems like Pillars is singled out a little. Like the point about urgency (it makes no sense fot you to be doing side quests while *insert plot* is happening). That can be applied to so many rpgs I honestly roll my eyes when it comes up. I get that it's a problem but it exists in so many games as people expect side quests in rpgs and ,many rpgs have some level of urgency to their main quest so it can be all epic and save the worldy.

 

Definitely. 

 

I'm clearly not the only one who did find the writing a bit too "heavy" in the first Pillars of Eternity and Yosharian has illustrated this point perfectly. 

 

Still, I don't believe the story is limited to the quality of the writing as it is important to take into account pacing and the way the main plot and side quests work together (something that has been brought up in this thread already). 

 

To make a great story we need a few basic things, mostly an antagonist and a reason that drives the protagonist to progress through a series of events. 

 

Some of these things are up to the player. 

 

It's entirely possible to embrace the story of the first Pillars of Eternity in different ways simply by considering the way you choose to react to the visions of the Watcher's past. Sure, you're still looking to thwart the villain's plans but your choices do inform the relationship with Thaos (and Iovara for that matter). 

 

I've played only 12 hours of Deadfire but so far I didn't feel like my guy wasn't properly motivated to look for his antagonist. Nor did I feel that it was out of character for him to look around for opportunities to make some dough on the side. Sure it may be easier because I am playing an antihero (or a very reluctant hero at best) and becoming the pawn of supernatural powers is not high on his list (nor is he very respectful of these powers). 

 

A pally or a more religious type may feel obligated to focus on the main quest and ignore the rest but even then the sense of urgency is entirely up to the player (sure getting his/her soul back is probably a priority for the Watcher but all things considered it is a tall order to confront a god whether you're prepared or not and in the meantime  a Watcher still has to eat and pay his crew). 

 

What I'm trying to say is that the most important part is the actual roleplaying. 

 

In the BG series you had a few elements that were predetermined and you could build around them. The game gave you enough leeway to allow you to expand upon these elements and make them yours. Going through the events in the game allowed you to flesh out your character by creating a past for what had been a blank slate. 

 

Pillars is like that. We do have certain elements that won't change but we also have some room to maneuver (which is why I like trying different things and why I enjoyed my last playthrough of PoE1 in which I played a self centred mercenary type who enjoyed being blunt when he could and devious when he had to). By the way, my guy never really considered Thaos to be the antagonist. It was less about defeating Thaos and more about moving on and getting closure for his Awakening. In some ways my character was an unwilling participant in the events that lead him to end up on a boat in the Deadfire Archipelago (after all he does hate boats). 

 

Sure, some may argue that all that doesn't make a difference and that whatever story you may choose to spin you still end up going through (roughly) the same events and (mostly) doing the same thing. They may even say that all we have is the illusion of choice. The pretence that our decisions matter and have a direct consequence on the story as a whole. 

 

The truth is that when it comes to roleplaying the only thing that matters is for the player(s) to believe in this illusion that is carefully woven by the game master. Things may take unexpected turns but most of the time the game master will adhere to a script and even if very good game masters can make it look effortless and give the impression that things are entirely up to the player it's never really the case. 

 

When it comes to videogames things are even more restrictive but in the end as long as the player is willing to suspend his disbelief then it's possible for the player to invest in the story and make it more personal and thus more relevant. 

 

If the player doesn't embrace that opportunity to fuel his or her imagination then all that is left is a by-the-numbers approach that will only be about facts and mechanics with decisions motivated by game logic instead of actual roleplaying in which case the fun will probably come from crunching numbers rather than getting immersed in a story. 

 

That's why a slow start is a boon for the roleplayer because it gives him or her time to fill in the blanks leisurely without having to worry about the action whereas a more down to earth approach will probably want to be entertained with more action and less introspection. Of course things may not be so clear cut and I don't mean to say that roleplayers don't want any action in their games but It seems to me that both ways of playing the game are at odds and I think Pillars of Eternity is more skewed towards roleplayers. If anything in the first game the whole series of events leading to Caed Nua could be viewed as a long tutorial. We could also say that both need different things from the game. The ones who focus on roleplaying need enough space to build their stories within the story whereas the more practical gamers probably want to be shown and take an active part in the action on the screen. It's only logical because what happens on the screen is the most important thing to them whereas the roleplayers use what is happening on the screen to cater to their own stories (and for them it's these stories that make what's happening on the screen interesting, not the other way around). 

 

In any case I've been going long enough with this post so I think it's a good time to stop. I just want to stress the fact that I don't think things are so clear cut in reality (I believe there is a bit of the roleplayer and of the number cruncher in all of us) but it may offer a clue as to the reasons why people seem to react so differently when it comes to the story in a CRPG. I know full well not everyone has an experience in pen and paper roleplaying but this is definitely something that you should consider getting into if you ever find yourself writing stories about your character in a video game. ;)


Edited by gloomseeker, 11 May 2018 - 06:13 AM.

  • Mikeymoonshine and misterjimmy like this

#47
morhilane

morhilane

    Chanter and Keeper of Truth of the Obsidian Order

  • Members
  • 1131 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Gold Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Deadfire Silver Backer
  • Fig Backer
  • Black Isle Bastard!

A God had awoken right in your house and killed everyone you knew there. Good. I mean quite personal, yes. But hey - you don't see it yourself, you are just told about that


The entire In-Between segment mention memory lost, it's like the first thing you are told. You the player might care about losing Caed Nua, your character isn't really in a condition to do so, yet the game gives you one dialogue choice that reflect a personal stake still.

Also, I'm not sure how you missed the intro cutscene right after "new game" and the intro narration that shows Caed Nua destruction.
 

That's (one aspect of) what people mean with "telling not showing": You don't _experience_ your Watcher problems, and growing insanity. You are being told that it's really bad and you should do something about it but it never seems to actually affect you.


Am I the only one who had translucide creepy stuff popping here and there while playing POE1? Or dialogue choices after talking to ghosts that went like "I think I'm going crazy"? I doubt it. The translucide creepy stuff and the talking to ghosts is was cause Watchers to become insane, but you, the player, decided how much your Watcher was mentally affected by what he/she was seeing in POE1, not the game.

#48
Ontarah

Ontarah

    (2) Evoker

  • Members
  • 91 posts
  • Location:Texas
  • Pillars of Eternity Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer

What is it about the way these stories are told that is putting people off?


Cannot speak to Deadfire as I'm still replaying PoE1. I can tell you what irks me about PoE1 though obviously it's just my opinion.

Basically, I hate fantasy that turns magic into science. It comes off like "I like how magic/fantasy/fairy stories make me feel, but I'm embarrassed that it's magic/fantasy/fairy stories that make me feel that way so I'm going to turn it into bad sci-fi instead." Not only does it sap all of the, well, magic out of the story, but it can't help but have this thinly-veiled declarative statement about how the world "really" works embedded in it.

Obviously, this was not enough to stop me from playing the game but that was mostly for the characters, lore, and side quest stories more than the main one.

Edited by Ontarah, 11 May 2018 - 06:57 AM.


#49
Voss

Voss

    (6) Magician

  • Members
  • 760 posts
It is a problem. I'd rather just be an adventurer and fall into a natural story.

These 'Chosen One and Epic Plotz!!!!' stories are consistently terrible. Where these games are good at all, its in the exploration and side quests, and sometimes the party.

Baldurs Gate handles it probably the best of these games. The hook is the iron crisis, a regional problem that has discernable motives and moving pieces. Sadly its completely wrecked and abandoned to focus on the ridiculous Child of Bhaal thing.

Can't grasp why being a wizard, warrior, or whatever isn't considered enough of a power fantasy.

Its also weird since if they're putting so much effort into a world, why put so much into 'Epic Plotz!!!' that will destroy\reshape it?

#50
Ontarah

Ontarah

    (2) Evoker

  • Members
  • 91 posts
  • Location:Texas
  • Pillars of Eternity Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
Eh, one other choice. I *really* hate all the descriptive "his eyes shift furtively" and "he wipes sweat from his brow" descriptive junk in the dialogue. The Infinity Engine games did not need it. Good dialogue in books doesn't need it. It's just baggage that slows everything down for no particular reason.

Edited by Ontarah, 11 May 2018 - 07:00 AM.


#51
Voss

Voss

    (6) Magician

  • Members
  • 760 posts

Am I the only one who had translucide creepy stuff popping here and there while playing POE1? Or dialogue choices after talking to ghosts that went like "I think I'm going crazy"? I doubt it. The translucide creepy stuff and the talking to ghosts is was cause Watchers to become insane, but you, the player, decided how much your Watcher was mentally affected by what he/she was seeing in POE1, not the game.

Of course you weren't the only one to see it. But if you consider how its presented (especially the first time through) there isn't any reason to associate it with you.

You wake up after the device and randomly see torture porn. OK, people obviously do weird rituals here, maybe they tortured people here and you're seeing spirits of the dead. Then you find you can talk to spirits of the dead. So the reasonable conclusion is this machine has let you see spirits and it has nothing to do with you.

Maerwald is a feeble old man and trapped in some sort of weird loop where he's raping his mother to burn his village over and over again. (And lost any sense that its different people). While horrible, That is completely different from what you're presented by the game. Especially since it just seems like you're seeing more spirits (including the mother)

So Maerwald is established as an unreliable source with personalities that are actively, if randomly, hostile towards you. After this point, you rarely see random visions of torture porn, and interact repeatedly with spirits, and its an actively useful Special Power that allows you to accomplish things no one else can. That the game occasionally pops up to tell you it is somehow a bad thing is utterly laughable.

Edited by Voss, 11 May 2018 - 07:28 AM.


#52
Crucis

Crucis

    (11) Wizard

  • Members
  • 1600 posts

 

I'll not play PoE2 for a few months, but I'm reading a few reviews.

 

The opinion on the story that got me most worried was Rock Paper Shotgun's on-going review. It said that the main story was too disconnect from every other quest (kinda similar to PoE1 actually). In PoE1 however, it was more forgivable because the main story was you seeking a way to get rid of your soul-awakening. It did not feel very imediate - which was a complaint from a lot of people - but at least it made sense when your character was dealing with a slow-progressing illness and chose to adventure here an there in sidequests.

 

Now, however, there's a giant god that took your soul stamping cities (apparently) and it just feels weird (according to the review) to be doing anything else besides following that god. This is a very poor story design decision and it god me less excited to play the game :(.

 

Can anyone who have played the beggining of the game give their thoughts about that?

 

I am a few hours into Deadfire and can confirm that, the pacing just feels wrong at the start. One day, you watch the gods discussing and get the feeling that this is an important matter. The next day (actually a week later, since you travel by ship) you start running errands in a really huge city. Eder even makes a comment about losing track.

 

Also you have a lot of stuff to micromanage, especially your ship, but also companions, factions and your personal fame. You have to make a lot of choices, like distributing skills on a borderline overwhelming skill tree, but can't really judge their outcome, since combat is very rare. And select a ship crew out of lots of NPCs, which all have different skills and character traits. And spend money you don't have on ship stuff you can't judge what it does. And hey, your cook broke her hand and morale goes down, since you don't have beer on board, manage that! Also there are several factions you can side with or not, but don't really get an idea how and why that matters and what consequences this will have in the future. There is one larger dungeon (a mansion of some kind), but the reason to enter it seems miniscule and also requires to take a side between two factions, where you can only talk to one of them. All other fights are simple brawls, a lot of buildings and persons have no meaning (yet).

 

I feel very lost and without a red thread. I know sooner or later everything will be pieced together, but the start is really rough. First you are drawn in, then you are let go. Everything you do feels pointless compared to your really important main quest.

 

It's still a good game, don't get me wrong :)

 

 

I may be an oddball here.  I know that some people wanted a more involved stronghold in/after PoE1.  I didn't.  I don't play this sort of game to play "Sim Stronghold".  I'm not interested in having to manage a castle, or a stronghold that's a ship.  I'm much more into the quests and the combat and the stories.  To me, managing a "stronghold" is an unnecessary distraction.

 

I do get that you need to get from place to play in the Deadfire and that requires a ship.  I'm just not sure why we should need to have to pay attention to the minutia of running said ship.



#53
Ontarah

Ontarah

    (2) Evoker

  • Members
  • 91 posts
  • Location:Texas
  • Pillars of Eternity Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
I didn't mind the Caed Nua stronghold building. What sucked was having to constantly come back to fight off attacks. If you left it to auto-resolve, it seems like 33% of your buildings would get torched 100% of the time, even if you had way higher defense than prestige.

I would usually knock the difficulty down to Storytime for these just to get it over and done with so I could get back to what I really cared about.

Edited by Ontarah, 11 May 2018 - 07:47 AM.

  • Yria, Baltic and Mikeymoonshine like this

#54
Crucis

Crucis

    (11) Wizard

  • Members
  • 1600 posts

I didn't mind the Caed Nua stronghold building. What sucked was having to constantly come back to fight off attacks. If you left it to auto-resolve, it seems like 33% of your buildings would get torched 100% of the time, even if you had way higher defense than prestige.

I would usually knock the difficulty down to Storytime for these just to get it over and done with so I could get back to what I really cared about.

 

Hence why I never left it to auto-resolve.  Of course, I liked the combat so heading back home for some R&R and a little practice time with the local rowdies (aka the people who dared attack my castle)!  :biggrin:



#55
Crucis

Crucis

    (11) Wizard

  • Members
  • 1600 posts

It is a problem. I'd rather just be an adventurer and fall into a natural story.

These 'Chosen One and Epic Plotz!!!!' stories are consistently terrible. Where these games are good at all, its in the exploration and side quests, and sometimes the party.

Baldurs Gate handles it probably the best of these games. The hook is the iron crisis, a regional problem that has discernable motives and moving pieces. Sadly its completely wrecked and abandoned to focus on the ridiculous Child of Bhaal thing.

Can't grasp why being a wizard, warrior, or whatever isn't considered enough of a power fantasy.

Its also weird since if they're putting so much effort into a world, why put so much into 'Epic Plotz!!!' that will destroy\reshape it?

 

I have no problem with Epic plots.  But I will say that letting you know right from the start that the story is epic seems unnecessary and arguably can cause the story to lose some of the epicness over time.  OTOH, if you start small with, say, the BG1 iron crisis, you have a small scale problem that you work to solve and you start picking up pieces to some larger plot that you are unaware of at the start of the story.  You have an increasingly larger mystery to solve, which can cause the epicness of the underlying main story to grow and grow as you uncover more and more.

 

I don't want to rip on the PoE2 story because I've only barely gotten started.  But it seems to me that POE1 and 2 bear a similarity with BG2, where in each 3 stories, you start with someone done you wrong in a very personal way.  OTOH, in IWD1 and 2, despite their arguable flaws for being very linear, you were just a relative nobody with a party of nobodies who ended up in the adventure.  And in BG1, you weren't a nobody, but you didn't necessarily realize that from the start.   Of course, I suppose in PoE1 and 2, it's hard for you to be a nobody given that you become a watcher at the start of PoE1, though that doesn't quite put you on the same level of importance as you are in BG2.  Watchers, while rare, are hardly gods and not entirely unheard of.

 

Perhaps the PoE1 storyline would have been a little better if there was no connection to Thaos at the very start.  You could still have been turned into a Watcher, but without any need to go chasing after this crazy guy (who turns out to be Thaos).  Obviously, a few tweaks here and there to the story would be needed to give you a reason to go to Caed Nua and the to Defiance Bay.  And then to go after Thaos.    Maybe someone hires you or otherwise inspires you to hunt for the assassin who killed the Duke and to stop what his dastardly plans were.  (Maybe Lady Webb wasn't killed and it was she who sends you after Thaos.) 

 

I don't think that the general PoE1 story line was irredeemable from the fault of seeming too epic from the start.  I think that it could have been tweaked in some minor ways to allow its epicness to be more of a growing mystery that you had to reveal like peeling an onion.

 

I have no idea how PoE2's story will play out.  I'll remain hopeful.



#56
PugPug

PugPug

    (4) Theurgist

  • Members
  • 303 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer

POE1's story was bad because the writers did the impossible by having mountains of words without actually telling the story at all until the end. There wasn't anything there to keep you interested. "Find the bad wizard before you go crazy" is the only goal for 95% of the game, and you don't even know why during that time.

 

"He's old and he does things. What things? Things. With people."

 

It's all like that.


Edited by PugPug, 11 May 2018 - 11:43 AM.


#57
artyom

artyom

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 32 posts

POE story is just like all the stupid marvel movies: there is a bad guy and you're the good guy. Except POE makes all these unnatural twists and turns for the sake of having twists/turns.

 

If there was an option I'd remove all these dumb dialogues I have to read related to the main story line and instead only read the separate quests. I am tired of seeing "Ethos" this Ethos that, or that I am the chosen one who is so special.

 

BG1 or BG2 stories were better at that time because we werent used to seeing stories. 20 years later, 10 more rpg games, and no story has changed. Just different names. No creativity put into the core of the story or to storytelling; all creativity was put into twists and turns which  only confuses and irritates me because I've no need to learn about another mythical tale of how a chosen one is so special that he defeats and challenges a god.  



#58
Hayte

Hayte

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 29 posts

The prose in PoE1 is very purple. When creating a Deadfire save state, I realised I had to wiki almost every choice because I could not remember anything I did in the game and I have over 750 hours played in PoE1. Yeah...


Edited by Hayte, 13 May 2018 - 02:49 AM.


#59
splicer777

splicer777

    (0) Nub

  • Initiates
  • 3 posts

The dialogue has to be witty in some way or it is not worth reading. The characters and voice acting make me cringe and directly interrupt my experience of the game. Maybe it's just me being an adult and I have a low tolerance for these things.

 

In Icewind Dale I created a party with 6 original custom portraits and my imagination did most of the work. Its enough to have good music, nice scenery, and swift pacing for an RPG like this. I think the greatest strength of the Infinity RPGs is CUSTOMIZATION. Just let me create the perfect character, the way I want to in my particular flavor of lore (very adult like, Witcher 3 style, no false heroism or epic cheese) and I can tolerate everything else about an RPG. 

No need for loads of text. Personally I don't like companions that talk to my character, even in BG1 I couldn't stand Imoen.

I feel more connected to my characters when they are original and they are mine like in IWD1. This allowed for a far more immersive experience. 



#60
gloomseeker

gloomseeker

    (3) Conjurer

  • Members
  • 167 posts

The prose in PoE1 is very purple. When creating a Deadfire save state, I realised I had to wiki almost every choice because I could not remember anything I did in the game and I have over 750 hours played in PoE1. Yeah...

 

I hate to be that guy but if you have spent 750 hours playing PoE1 and can't remember most of these choices then either you haven't been paying attention at all or you have a really terrible memory.


  • Starwars, peko and PantherX14 like this





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: story, plot, deadfire, pillarsofeternity

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users