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Oh man, I would love to get it, but it is probably Steam only :(

 

https://www.gog.com/game/tyranny_commander_edition_preorder

 

Or did you mean the boxed version only

 

 

The boxed version only. No reason to collect boxed edition, when it is Steam only, the collectors value is lowered a lot.

Edited by Mamoulian War

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1) God of War III - PS3 - 24+ hours

2) Final Fantasy XIII - PS3 - 130+ hours

3) White Knight Chronicles International Edition - PS3 - 525+ hours

4) Hyperdimension Neptunia - PS3 - 80+ hours

5) Final Fantasy XIII-2 - PS3 - 200+ hours

6) Tales of Xillia - PS3 - 135+ hours

7) Hyperdimension Neptunia mk2 - PS3 - 152+ hours

8.) Grand Turismo 6 - PS3 - 81+ hours (including Senna Master DLC)

9) Demon's Souls - PS3 - 197+ hours

10) Tales of Graces f - PS3 - 337+ hours

11) Star Ocean: The Last Hope International - PS3 - 750+ hours

12) Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII - PS3 - 127+ hours

13) Soulcalibur V - PS3 - 73+ hours

14) Gran Turismo 5 - PS3 - 600+ hours

15) Tales of Xillia 2 - PS3 - 302+ hours

16) Mortal Kombat XL - PS4 - 95+ hours

17) Project CARS Game of the Year Edition - PS4 - 120+ hours

18) Dark Souls - PS3 - 197+ hours

19) Hyperdimension Neptunia Victory - PS3 - 238+ hours

20) Final Fantasy Type-0 - PS4 - 58+ hours

21) Journey - PS4 - 9+ hours

22) Dark Souls II - PS3 - 210+ hours

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http://www.pcgamesn.com/tyranny/tyranny-evil-gameplay



Tyranny's take on evil isn't just nuanced, it's disturbing
 
If you've ever had the unfortunate experience of working as a manager for a large company, you're already well-versed with Tyranny's version of evil. At a preview event last week, I had the opportunity to sit down and play through the first few hours of Obsidian Entertainment's ‘evil has won’ RPG. As the type of person who sometimes gets a kick out of being contrarian, I went into that demo with the purpose of poking holes in Tyranny's attempts to seduce me to the dark side. If Tyranny wanted me to be bad, I was going to do everything in my power to do just the opposite. I thought it would be funny, but instead it left me feeling depressed. It's not because Tyranny doesn't accommodate being good, but because I found myself too weak-willed to choose it.
 
You see, in Tyranny, evil isn't some otherworldly demon that only wants to cause suffering. Instead, it's the kind of evil manifested in bureaucracies, ignorance, and ‘the greater good’. It's the evil of getting to work one morning and finding out that a group of executives you've never met have decided it's now your job to fire several employees. But as an agent in an authoritarian empire, I'm not just handing out severance packages.
 
I'm handing out death sentences.
 
Tyranny's story starts with a grim ultimatum. An army of separatists have congregated in a valley and need to be crushed before their rebellion spreads. The two armies that Kyros, the divine emperor of Tyranny, has sent to end the rebellion aren't getting the mission done. Instead, their radically different cultures have them squabbling like siblings, and it's my job to get them to cooperate and complete their objective. Making things worse is Kyros' passion for deadlines. As a godlike being of immeasurable power, he can issue magical ‘edicts’ that have devastating consequences if not fulfilled. In this case, his armies have eight days to settle their dispute and crush the rebellion or everyone—including me—will die. Now if that's not a good management tactic, I don't know what is.
 
As I arrive in the camp, I'm already dreading the decisions I know I'll need to make. With such a strict deadline, I'm torn over the best method to get the two factions to play nice. The Disfavored are an elite unit that values discipline and order, while the Scarlet Chorus is a rowdy warband of barbarians that thrive on chaos, but both are equally powerful. While I can simply side with one army and rebuke the other, both generals make it obvious that they'll make my life hell if I disrespect them. As if it's not bad enough that I have to settle their disputes, I also need to placate them.
 
Part of what makes these decisions tough is how incredibly well-realized Tyranny's world is. The writing and characterizations promise to be some of the finest that Obsidian Entertainment have ever done, and I immediately felt invested in the story. Strangely, I also found myself resenting Tyranny for that exact reason. You see, that investment also lets Tyranny manipulate me in ways that few RPGs ever have.
 
An hour into the demo, I arrive in the Scarlet Chorus camp to offer my aid helping the army get started on our mission to crush the separatists. A captain by the name of Fifth-Eye tells me that their progress is stalled by a pesky band of rebels in the nearby mountains. Fortunately, a recently captured prisoner might have some information that will lead to the rebel's camp, allowing me to take them out and free up the Scarlet Chorus to move into the valley. And this is where I began to realize that being good in Tyranny isn't easy.
 
I find the prisoner strapped to a pole in the center of camp. Beaten and broken by her captors, she's immediately willing to spill her secrets in exchange for her life. But as I question her, I realize that she isn't telling the truth. Using one of Tyranny's dialogue skill checks, I'm able to call her bluff and reveal her lies. Her facade crumbles and she begins begging for her life, and, wanting to be a good person, I take pity on her.
 
But Fifth-Eye isn't moved by her pleas. To him, her attempt to deceive us is a crime punishable by death. I stop him, but realize then the predicament that Tyranny has put me in. If I override Fifth-Eye's authority in front of his soldiers, that would harm my relationship with the Scarlet Chorus and jeopardize our mission. Even worse, Fifth-Eye's aggressive nature has me worried he might be dumb enough to fight me. But if I standby and let him kill this prisoner, wouldn't I be complicit in this woman's death?
 
I manage to convince Fifth-Eye that there's another option. The Scarlet Chorus has a reputation for absorbing the armies they defeat into their own ranks, and I urge him to let this woman decide her own fate by taking on a rite of initiation. For a moment, I feel proud that I managed to solve the problem without bloodshed. But then it's revealed that her initiation means savagely murdering her fellow prisoners with nothing but a rock. After all, she needs to prove she's loyal to her new masters.
 
It's here that Tyranny's treatment of morality resonates with me in a way that few games ever have. In most RPGs, good and evil are simple choices that have simple consequences. But Tyranny's choices don't fit neatly into my preconceived notions of right and wrong, and I'm left feeling conflicted and bitter. For a person who is supposed to have a great deal of respect and authority, I realize I have none at all.
 
Reading the grotesque lines of text describing a woman smashing her friends' skulls in with a rock while, all around me, Scarlet Chorus soldiers watch unflinchingly, I realize that I am a stranger in a strange land. I wanted to be good in Tyranny, to defy its expectations of me as the player, but one hour into the demo and I'm already responsible for a tragedy because I didn't have the guts to stand up for what I thought was right. I compromised for "the greater good." But I don't feel great, and I certainly don't feel good.
 
Being good in Tyranny doesn't mean simply picking the blue coloured dialogue option. It means defying the cultural norms of a society you're invested in and jeopardizing lives and objectives. It means putting yourself at risk. My instinct to acquiesce to that pressure is what depresses me as the evening ends and I return home.
 
When our moral compass points to absolutes, we're forced to make decisions that can negatively impact not just our own lives but the lives of the people around us. But at what point does that pressure begin to bend the compass needle? Even though I can't wait to play more, Tyranny's take on evil troubles me because it mirrors reality alarmingly well. When you sit down to play a fantasy RPG, the last thing you expect is to be reminded of the issues plaguing the real world. In that sense, Tyranny might just end up being the most politically relevant game of this year. Not because it has an agenda to push but because it has a disturbing understanding of the concessions we're willing to make when standing up for what's right demands sacrifices. Like a beloved relative spouting racial slurs while we quietly avert our eyes and say nothing, doing the right thing in Tyranny is complicated.

Edited by Infinitron
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Is there a physical edition? I mean, I like to physically own the games that are important to me. Yeah, a silly artifact of the past :p .

 

If you're in one of the above three countries, or don't mind ordering from abroad.

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Quite an experience to live in misery isn't it? That's what it is to be married with children.

I've seen things you people can't even imagine. Pearly Kings glittering on the Elephant and Castle, Morris Men dancing 'til the last light of midsummer. I watched Druid fires burning in the ruins of Stonehenge, and Yorkshiremen gurning for prizes. All these things will be lost in time, like alopecia on a skinhead. Time for tiffin.

 

Tea for the teapot!

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Is there a physical edition? I mean, I like to physically own the games that are important to me. Yeah, a silly artifact of the past :p .

 

If you're in one of the above three countries, or don't mind ordering from abroad.

 

 

No, I don't mind ordering it at all. Is an Obsidian game after all ;) . If the worst comes to pass, it'll be a nice decoration.

 

edit: how do I import?

Edited by hrwd
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I'm afraid i've never used a company for import, relying instead on friends abroad, so I can't help unfortunately.

Quite an experience to live in misery isn't it? That's what it is to be married with children.

I've seen things you people can't even imagine. Pearly Kings glittering on the Elephant and Castle, Morris Men dancing 'til the last light of midsummer. I watched Druid fires burning in the ruins of Stonehenge, and Yorkshiremen gurning for prizes. All these things will be lost in time, like alopecia on a skinhead. Time for tiffin.

 

Tea for the teapot!

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I read that there will be no combat friendly fire, which is probably my biggest disappointment about the game so far (even moreso than 4-char parties).

 

Ah well.  Still... Obsidian CRPG.  Should be good in other ways.  Maybe at some point someone will mod it.

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https://blog.tyrannygame.com/2016/10/27/dev-diary-12-spires/

 

Two of the most prominent features of the world of Terratus are the Oldwalls and the Spires. We mentioned the Oldwalls in our update about the Bane and showed some gameplay inside the Oldwalls in a previous stream. The Spires play a prominent role in the game’s narrative, and also serve as the location for the player’s base.

 

As you explore the Tiers you have the opportunity to gain access to several of these Spires. Claiming a Spire unlocks several gameplay benefits:

 

Reduced Travel Time: Each Spire is magically linked with the others. Once activated, you can teleport between your spires, reducing your travel time through the Tiers.

 

Upgrading Your Spires: Once you’ve acquired a Spire, you can spend money to build an upgrade on top of the Spire. You can find the details of each upgrade below. Each upgrade provides different benefits to your party, among them providing different rest bonuses when you rest at your Spire. You receive the bonuses for all of your upgrades when you rest at any of your spires.

 

Hiring Recruits: Once an upgrade has been built on top of a spire, you can begin hiring recruits to work for you at that upgrade. Recruits provide several functions for your party: they can train your party members in skills, they can sell unique weapons and armor, and they can produce new items for your party while they’re out adventuring.

 

Recruits can come from many different factions in the game, including from your enemies. With the right price, some members of factions that hate you are more than willing to work for you at your Spire. Some recruits are only available if you make certain choices during Conquest.

 

Spire Upgrades

 

There are four possible upgrades you can build on a Spire. Each upgrade can only be built once and cannot be removed once built. So once you choose to build a Training Ground, you’ll need to find another Spire before you can build the Library.

 

Once an upgrade has been constructed, it costs money to maintain. Each month than an upgrade is active, you must pay its maintenance cost. If you don’t have the money for the maintenance cost, then the upgrade is suspended and you no longer receive any benefits of the upgrade until you can pay it again.

 

Infirmary: The Infirmary upgrade provides a place where healers and alchemists can gather. Once this upgrade is built, you will be able to brew your own potions and poisons and prepare various plants to be safely consumed by your party. This upgrade can be vital to ensure your party’s survival – especially on harder difficulty modes.

 

Library: Once constructed, the Library upgrade attracts Sages and scholars from around the Tiers. After all, there aren’t many great libraries left after Kyros destroyed the Vellum Citadel. The Library allows your recruits to research hidden lore – from powerful magical Sigils that allow you to enhance and customize your spells, to stories of ancient Artifacts that you might be able to forge anew. Players who want to get the most out of the Spell Crafting system will make the Library and priority.

 

Forge: Smiths throughout the Tiers, including Kyros’ Forge-Bound, will be amazed at the Forge you can construct on one of your Spires. Building this upgrade allows you to increase the quality of your weapons and armor, improving their damage and defense characteristics. The Forge also allows you to create unique Artifacts and special named items that you won’t find anywhere else in the game.

 

Training Grounds: The greatest weapon masters and mages in the Tiers are drawn to the Training Grounds. Once constructed, you’ll be able to attract the finest skill trainers, able to increase your party members’ skills to the highest ranks.

Edited by Infinitron
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What's up with CRPGs and silly "strongholds"? Personally, I don't feel as though they were very good in BG2, and I haven't seen them be much better ever since...

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Put fascists and sociopaths on your ignore list.

Quote

Never believe that anti-Semites are completely unaware of the absurdity of their replies. They know that their remarks are frivolous, open to challenge. But they are amusing themselves, for it is their adversary who is obliged to use words responsibly, since he believes in words. They even like to play with discourse for, by giving ridiculous reasons, they discredit the seriousness of their interlocutors. They delight in acting in bad faith, since they seek not to persuade by sound argument but to intimidate and disconcert. If you press them too closely, they will abruptly fall silent, loftily indicating by some phrase that the time for argument is past.

 

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I don't think what they have in Tyranny really constitutes stronghold - instead it seems to be all about choosing in which order you wish to have accessible which services, which could be an interesting decision, even tho I'd like some to be mutually exclusive. Oh well.

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So I want a physical copy but I also want it to be on GOG. Alas, I doubt the option would be provided. I'll probably go with the boxed copy from the UK, Amazon doesn't ship it to Australia (which is unfortunate because I have copies of Civ6 and Dishonored 2 in my Amazon UK cart right now) but OzGameShop does. And price-wise, physical copies are actually significantly cheaper thanks to Brexit.

 

Archon edition (all prices converted to AUD for comparison):

GOG = $69

Steam = ~$79

Cheapest legit Steam key reseller - GamesPlanet UK = $61.50

Amazon physical (theoretically) = $67 + some expensive shipping unless you combine it with other stuff

OzGameShop (UK-based despite the name) = $52 with 5% back as store credit (you can also check with their parent store 365games.co.uk)

 

Obvious which one to go for based on price there. If I'm very lucky it'll show up on GOG Connect down the line, or else I'll buy it there when it's cheap.

 

 

P.S. Dishonored 2 is currently insanely cheap at 32GBP on Amazon UK, but you'll probably want to buy some other stuff to make up for the expensive shipping.

Edited by Humanoid

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Is there a physical edition? I mean, I like to physically own the games that are important to me. Yeah, a silly artifact of the past :p .

 

If you're in one of the above three countries, or don't mind ordering from abroad.

 

 

No, I don't mind ordering it at all. Is an Obsidian game after all ;) . If the worst comes to pass, it'll be a nice decoration.

 

edit: how do I import?

 

 

There are two main factors involved here: one is whether the selling shop is willing to send the particular item to your country (on Amazon for example it will say on the item page itself whether it's allowed, other stores might stop you on checkout). The other is your country's own laws regarding imports, which is more difficult to answer.

 

Most countries I imagine would have some form of import taxes and/or import duties which apply, though often they have a threshold under which no tax is charged. Australia, where I am, charges nothing unless the total value of the order is above $1000AUD, but that's unusually generous compared to most countries. In the UK for example, import taxes (from outside the EU, for now) apply for anything valued above a mere 15 pounds.

 

I've never exceeded the threshold, but from what I know, if you need to pay said tax or import duties, you'll probably get a letter from your country's customs department (or the post office if they do this on behalf of customs) with some paperwork to fill out and information on how to pay what you owe before they'll release your stuff into the mail system. (For larger imports the courier company may contact you directly)

 

 

P.S. The stores I have used to import from the UK are below, I've had good experiences with each:

 

Amazon (obvious)

365games.co.uk / ozgameshop.com (same company)

TheHut.com / zavvi.com (same company)

base.com (formerly dvd.co.uk)

Edited by Humanoid

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Despite how much I eventually grew to dislike Pillars, I'm genuinely excited for this game.  The setting and premise have me really intrigued, so hopefully the story delivers and manages to sink its hooks into me, unlike the aforementioned Pillars.

breen_tuna.gif.f209371d450243737d37ca9251849aff.gif

 

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Last companion: https://blog.tyrannygame.com/2016/11/01/dev-diary-13-sirin/
 

Dev Diary #13 – Sirin
 



1 NOVEMBER, 2016
AuthorBy Brian Heins


In our last developer update, we introduced you to the Spires of Terratus – your base in Tyranny. For this week’s update, we’re going to introduce you to the last of your potential Companions – Sirin, Archon of Song.

tyranny_dev_diary___sirin_portrait.png?wSirin caused the death of more people before she was seven than most soldiers do in their entire careers. One of the few mages on Terratus who was born with magic, Sirin first displayed her abilities the first time she cried. The midwife assisting with her birth burst out crying and asked what that bright light was and why everything was so cold. Her parents quickly learned anyone who heard Sirin’s voice was compelled by the emotion behind it. Fortunately for them, she was a genial and easy-going child, so it wasn’t much of a problem. Occasionally they would have to remind her not to use her powers on local children – especially after an episode with a local bully – but there were never any major incidents until she was seven years old.
Once word spread that Sirin had powers, people from all over requested her help. Crops weren’t growing? Send for Sirin. Your son broke his leg? Send for Sirin. People spoke of her miraculous voice and its heavenly sound. It wasn’t long before she gained the nickname Songbird, and everyone wanted to hear the Songbird sing.  Eventually, tales of Sirin’s voice reached Kyros, who knew that if this child truly was as powerful as everyone said, she could be a power tool for conquest. Using the Voices of Nerat, Kyros kidnapped Sirin from her family and delivered her to the royal court for training. During her schooling, she was deemed too dangerous to be allowed to use the full extent of her powers, so Kyros and the Voices of Nerat created a special helmet, placing it permanently on her head. If Sirin tried to go beyond the limits the helmet placed on her, the gem placed in it would shatter, killing her.
Once she was deemed ready (and properly under control), she was given back to the Voices of Nerat to help the Scarlet Chorus in their recruiting efforts. From that point on, her voice was used to convince any and all to join the Scarlet Chorus and fight for Kyros. But Sirin knew that she – and her voice – were simply a means to an end and that the moment she stopped being useful, her life was forfeit, so she did her best to recruit as many bodies as she could for the Chorus while planning a means of escape if the opportunity ever presented itself.

~Robert Land, Narrative Designer


Combat Role
Sirin was designed to control and manipulate the flow of battle by afflicting her foes with terrible sicknesses of the mind and body. Sirin’s power as an Archon grants her the unique ability to influence others with song (Those who played Pillars of Eternity’s Chanter class will be familiar with her mechanics). In combat, she will passively sing, causing minor blights and hindrances to foes that hear her voice, as well as subtle benefits to her allies.
As Sirin sings, she builds up a resource called ‘Breath’ that is later used to perform an ‘Aria’. Arias unleash powerful concentrated magical effects from Sirin’s voice on those she directs it towards. These effects can be devastating for enemies, or invigorating for her allies, depending on the Aria performed. A unique progression tree is used for Sirin’s songs that is automatically advanced as she gains levels, unlocking new songs, while Arias must be purchased exclusively from her two talent trees. Overall, the focus from each tree is directed towards either making Sirin a peaceful songstress who aids her allies with powerful beneficial effects, or an aggressive weaver of vengeful arias who aims to break her enemies where they stand.
Since Sirin’s songs are passive in combat. When designing them we thought it reasonable to assume that many users will want to pick one that has an enjoyable effect and leave it active in most cases. This is absolutely OK, and many songs serve to support this strategy. However, we wanted each song to also exist as a tactical counter to occasional problems posed against the party. For instance, I may enjoy using the song ‘Glory in Battle’ to grant my party several direct stat boosts, but if I’m currently facing against the Bane, I might be inclined to temporarily switch to the song ‘Bane of Night’, which is incredibly effective against Bane units. Every song is intended to have a specific theme to its effects and is also designed to have a larger payoff at the end of the song if the last stanza is reached.
When building Sirin’s talent trees, we wanted to allow players to decide if Sirin fits better in their group as a supporter of party offense or defense. Sirin’s ‘Peace’ tree provides several defensive talents, utilities, and a number of Arias that help to bolster ally defenses, free them from hostile effects, and even revive unconscious party members. Sirin’s ‘War’ tree has talents built to use Arias more quickly as well as a variety of offensive Arias that affect enemy minds, push them around the battlefield, or even shock them into submission.
Below are some songs available to Sirin:
Sword of Strength, Sword of Justice: A song of valor and defiance. Adopted by the Vendrien Guard to boost morale in their rebellion. Raises the Might, Wits, and Vitality of nearby allies with the sound of Sirin’s voice.
Bringer of Death: A song ominously describing the power of Kyros’ will as it washes over life and land, reaping those that stand against it. Lowers the Resolve, Parry, and Dodge of nearby enemies, as well applying the Weakened affliction to them.
Blood Brings the Dawn: A powerful battle chant Sirin was forced to sings for the Scarlet Chorus to inspire their victory. Raises ally movement speed and causes enemies to take Fire damage and Bleed effects.
Below are some of the abilities available to Sirin:
Aria of Respite: Sirin’s notes seep into the minds of her allies and draw them to lucidity. Removes a hostile effect from each ally affected.
Aria of Confusion: Sirin bombards her enemies with a cacophony of tormenting sounds. Those that fail to resist her power are Confused.
Sustained Breath: At the end of combat, Sirin can retain Breath for several minutes.
Rapid Tempo: Sirin accelerates her vocal progressions, increasing the speed of her songs and causing her to move through each stanza more quickly, but shortening the duration of their effects.
Guise of Innocence: While not wearing Heavy Armor, Siring becomes immune to engagement.
Aria of Nightmares: Sirin recalls a nightmare and begins to sing. The power in her voice creates an physical embodiment of her memory that will terrify and torment her foes.
Sirin is a literal font of power. With enough time, Sirin’s songs and arias can bring ruin to armies. While not exceptionally powerful in the early moments of combat, when Sirin builds enough Breath to perform an Aria, she can completely lock down small groups of enemies, or grant a surge that sends allies to victory. However, choosing the right Aria for the moment is important, since her Breath takes time to rebuild. Sirin is also rather frail defensively, so while it’s important to make sure she’s close to the battle for her songs, she should not wander close enough to draw attention. If she finds herself in trouble, abilities like Guise of Innocence can help her to escape, but ultimately she will need another ally to step in and take the enemies’ focus.
The longer a battle rages on, the more Sirin’s power seals the enemy’s fate.

~Nick Carver, Systems Designer

tyranny_dev_diary___sirin.png?w=730

 

Edited by Infinitron
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