Jump to content

Welcome to Obsidian Forum Community
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

An Honest but Harsh Review on the Setting

review lore setting language

  • Please log in to reply
144 replies to this topic

#141
Varana

Varana

    (5) Thaumaturgist

  • Members
  • 480 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer
  • Black Isle Bastard!

by the way, I have always hated Baldur's Gate (D&Ds???) custom of mixing Tolkien-style fantasy names with Fantasy Class B English Names. Sword Coast, Candlekeep, Trademeet etc. sound super retarded for me, I cannot imagine places being called like that in real world. Just smashing two random words against each other and done. This is a part of 'classic roleplays' I could never accept because it was a bit immersion breaking for me. PoE's naming, with cities like Defiance Bay, somehow feels more serious and making sense for me. I don't know, maybe that's just me.

Sure, that would never happen in the real world...
 
Now I'm just off to visit my parents, who live in Blackpool. On the way I will stop in and visit my aunt, who live in Thornton, near Southport. I hope the traffic round Guildford isn't too bad...

And if they're made well, even the Tolkienesque fantasy names once were of this type, but due to language changes, being in foreign languages, or incorporating personal names, are unrecognisable at first sight.
I used to live in a city called something like "Stony Creek". But because the name is of Slavic origin in Germany, most people don't understand its root in the first place, and then it went through several changes over the centuries. And the result is a "fantasy" place name which is another of the "retarded" ones, just mangled by time.
For the most part, all place names have origins like that. If your fantasy names are well done, they could, theoretically, be traced back to their rather mundane origins. (And we can safely assume that that is the case with Tolkien's names, even in those cases where he doesn' t tell us outright - Nargothrond sounds fancy, but essentially only means Narog-Fortress.)

Edited by Varana, 27 June 2015 - 02:59 AM.


#142
Elerond

Elerond

    One of the Obsidian Order

  • Members
  • 2649 posts
  • Location:Finland
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer

Any naming method that you can think to use in fantasy setting you probably find out that it is actually method that is actually used in somewhere in real world to name places. 



#143
Fardragon

Fardragon

    (10) Necromancer

  • Members
  • 1456 posts
  • Location:England

 

 

by the way, I have always hated Baldur's Gate (D&Ds???) custom of mixing Tolkien-style fantasy names with Fantasy Class B English Names. Sword Coast, Candlekeep, Trademeet etc. sound super retarded for me, I cannot imagine places being called like that in real world. Just smashing two random words against each other and done. This is a part of 'classic roleplays' I could never accept because it was a bit immersion breaking for me. PoE's naming, with cities like Defiance Bay, somehow feels more serious and making sense for me. I don't know, maybe that's just me.

Sure, that would never happen in the real world...
 
Now I'm just off to visit my parents, who live in Blackpool. On the way I will stop in and visit my aunt, who live in Thornton, near Southport. I hope the traffic round Guildford isn't too bad...

 

And if they're made well, even the Tolkienesque fantasy names once were of this type, but due to language changes, being in foreign languages, or incorporating personal names, are unrecognisable at first sight.
I used to live in a city called something like "Stony Creek". But because the name is of Slavic origin in Germany, most people don't understand its root in the first place, and then it went through several changes over the centuries. And the result is a "fantasy" place name which is another of the "retarded" ones, just mangled by time.
For the most part, all place names have origins like that. If your fantasy names are well done, they could, theoretically, be traced back to their rather mundane origins. (And we can safely assume that that is the case with Tolkien's names, even in those cases where he doesn' t tell us outright - Nargothrond sounds fancy, but essentially only means Narog-Fortress.)

 

Sure, it's pretty common for place names to be a mixture of current words, obsolete words, and words from languages that where previously used in the region. Tolkien uses this a lot, but it's also in PoE (e.g. Caed Nua).



#144
Nakia

Nakia

    Rogue of the Obsidian Order

  • Members
  • 1153 posts
  • Location:New Jersey, USA
  • Steam:nakiarogue
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer

In the USA many place names come from other languages than English, some rather straight forward and others have been some what changed.

Ohio, Kentucky, Florida, Brooklyn, Gila Bend, Louisville just to name a few.



#145
Tigranes

Tigranes

    Obsidian VIP

  • Members
  • 10491 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer

The lesson, as backed up by dozens of examples in this thread alone, is that if you know anything about how naming worked throughout human history, then you see how it works in things like POE, The Witcher, LOTR, and so forth.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: review, lore, setting, language

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users