Jump to content

Welcome to Obsidian Forum Community
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

An Honest but Harsh Review on the Setting

review lore setting language

  • Please log in to reply
144 replies to this topic

#61
fgalkin

fgalkin

    (4) Theurgist

  • Members
  • 226 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer
  • Deadfire Silver Backer
  • Fig Backer

Why is "consul" acceptable, but "duc" is not? Neither are English terms, so neither should be allowed, under your reasoning. Besides, "consul" doesn't even make sense, as the position is nothing alike, Might as well call it "Ambassador" or "Hierophant" or any other meaningless, but pretentious-sounding term

 

Have a very nice day.

-fgalkin


Edited by fgalkin, 05 May 2015 - 11:22 AM.


#62
guguma

guguma

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Backer

Why is "consul" acceptable, but "duc" is not? Neither are English terms, so neither should be allowed, under your reasoning. Besides, "consul" doesn't even make sense, as the position is nothing alike, Might as well call it "Ambassador" or "Hierophant" or any other meaningless, but pretentious-sounding term

 

Have a very nice day.

-fgalkin

 

What do you expect me to do, if you still insist on not seeing the big picture but dwell on individual words. I agree that the position is nothing alike a consul. Then what is the position alike, did such a position ever exist in the real world? Is the position alike a "duc". "Duc" resembles the idea of a duke, a feodal ruler, not elected. A consul conveys the idea of an elected official, yet not by the people but rather by a favored class. Which one has closer meaning to the ruling class of Vailian Republics?

 

If you are going to use "duc" you might as well use "duke" instead. Would you like it if I used "Consool" instead of Consul. I would not, because Consool screams "I wanted to say consul, but did not, so I made a silly word for consul, now I have to define what Consool means, however I might have simply used consul instead and redefined the word in my setting". Just as "Duc" screams, "I wanted to say duke, but did not, so I made a silly word for duke, now I have to define what Duc means, however I might have simply used duke instead and redefined the word in my setting."



#63
fgalkin

fgalkin

    (4) Theurgist

  • Members
  • 226 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer
  • Deadfire Silver Backer
  • Fig Backer
"Duc" comes from the Italian "duce," which was the alternate pronunciation of the word "doge." Which is exactly the title they meant when they made the setting- a lifelong elected leadership position in the mercantile republics of Venice and Genoa. It was not arbitrary at all. Neither are the other terms they used.

It's terms like "Godlike" and "disease pudding" that are the problematic ones.

Have a very nice day.
-fgalkin
  • Varana, kaiki and Anonymous1924 like this

#64
Rosveen

Rosveen

    Obsidian Order's Prophet of Woe

  • Members
  • 708 posts
  • Location:Gdańsk
  • Pillars of Eternity Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Lords of the Eastern Reach Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer

It's terms like "Godlike" and "disease pudding" that are the problematic ones.

Why is Godlike problematic?

I like these "silly" words because they reinforce the impression that all nations speak different languages. It's realistic and gives them a unique flavor. They seem to be well thought out, foreign, but drawing from European roots and therefore familiar enough to not overwhelm me. It was a little confusing at first, but after a few hours the naming conventions started coming together.
 

One can revert to their native language when they lack the word they need to express themselves, but would it mean anything?
 
English is a foreign language to me, if I lacked the words in English to explain something here on this forum and reverted to my native language you would not understand anything and would ask me what I meant, and I would go find a way to express it in the English language.
 
It would be interesting to add a companion who insisted using words from their native language, and would not know the translation to common. It makes no sense for them to utter words in their native language and right afterwards give us a common translation.

I sometimes use terms from my native language, explaining them as "the equivalent of English X" or "similar to Y, but different in this and that aspect". Quite like your example: "Our tribal leaders, the anamfath..." I wouldn't mention the original name visiting the UK, but when I was giving directions to a friend visiting my country, I actually did use our names so they'd be able to recognize them when they reached their destination.


Edited by Rosveen, 05 May 2015 - 01:12 PM.


#65
Razorchain

Razorchain

    (3) Conjurer

  • Members
  • 141 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer

 

Dyrwood is based on the USA. The USA has ridiculous names like "Delaware," "Massachusetts," and "Mississippi." Such silliness! Who would come up with silly names like that?! Why didn't they just call it "Pilgrim Land," or "River Land?"

 

I do not want a linguistics lesson just by looking at a map! 3/10!

 

Have a very nice day.

-fgalkin

 

Those names have historic roots, based on history, The History, that actually happened, sadly most are named after massacred and extinct Native Americans, not only states but many cities and counties too. I just looked at what Mississippi meant and, surprise, it means "The Father of Waters"

 

We know Massachusetts, Paris, Berlin, Cairo, Copenhagen, because we live on earth. When someone tells you they live in Copenhagen, you understand perfectly well what they mean.

 

I do not intend to read the "Collected Volumes on the History of Dyrwood" or keep a "Concise Engwithian Dictionary" with me while I am trying to enjoy a story. 

 

 

Well but Copenhagen isn't the real name it's København.  It's just foreigners to Scandinavia that call it Copenhagen.  In old norse it's called Kaupmannahøfn which literally means Merchant City. So for me calling things something other than standard english words is no problem


  • kaiki likes this

#66
guguma

guguma

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Backer

 

 

Dyrwood is based on the USA. The USA has ridiculous names like "Delaware," "Massachusetts," and "Mississippi." Such silliness! Who would come up with silly names like that?! Why didn't they just call it "Pilgrim Land," or "River Land?"

 

I do not want a linguistics lesson just by looking at a map! 3/10!

 

Have a very nice day.

-fgalkin

 

Those names have historic roots, based on history, The History, that actually happened, sadly most are named after massacred and extinct Native Americans, not only states but many cities and counties too. I just looked at what Mississippi meant and, surprise, it means "The Father of Waters"

 

We know Massachusetts, Paris, Berlin, Cairo, Copenhagen, because we live on earth. When someone tells you they live in Copenhagen, you understand perfectly well what they mean.

 

I do not intend to read the "Collected Volumes on the History of Dyrwood" or keep a "Concise Engwithian Dictionary" with me while I am trying to enjoy a story. 

 

 

Well but Copenhagen isn't the real name it's København.  It's just foreigners to Scandinavia that call it Copenhagen.  In old norse it's called Kaupmannahøfn which literally means Merchant City. So for me calling things something other than standard english words is no problem

 

 

Exactly, thus when the city was founded it was named "Merchant City" (Merchant's Haven maybe?), it was given a meaningful name, just like how every culture names everything. Just as the Mississippi example.

 

So for you calling things something other than standard English words is no problem, tsk tsk, unbelieveable. I always call things in English, I travel to many countries yet I insist calling everything in English. When I go to Denmark I go up to the train conductor and tell them they have made a huge mistake, I will go to Copenhagen not to some nonsense called København and when s/he replies to me in Danish, I raise my arms in complete bafflement and yell them to stop talking nonsense.

 

Is this what you were able to fathom from all my posts?

 

A large portion of people in this argument are comparing the evolution of words and languages over thousands of years, uttered by thousands of cultures and evolved through years of intercultural relations, to the evolution of non-complete languages created in the past 3 years.



#67
Ieldra

Ieldra

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 28 posts
  • Location:Düsseldorf, Germany
  • Pillars of Eternity Gold Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer

About the names, here's how I see it:

 

(1) Names and titles have cultural baggage, and using the same names and titles as, for instance, at a certain time and place in real-world history transfers that cultural baggage to the fictional world. Which is fine if that's what you want, otherwise it's detrimental to the setting's identity. So using invented names for things that don't work like similar things in real-world cultures is often a necessity.

 

(2) Descriptive names are intrinsically problematic. Many real-world locations have them but they work only because we've grown up with them. If you sit back and think about what they mean, quite often they'd appear just as silly as some of the descriptive names used in some fantasy settings. 

 

For that reason, alien-sounding names are a necessity for some fantasy settings, especially if you want to emphasize that it actually *is* a fantastic setting where important things work differently than in the real world, rather than simply the pseudo-historical underpinning for a castle opera. In fact, rather frequently within PoE the invented names aren't alien enough to dispense with the cultural baggage they're carrying. Some examples have been mentioned. Yes, it takes time and effort to get an impression of the world if so much of the lore is expressed in alien terms, but that - deciphering the world - is part of what makes fantasy settings interesting.

 

The other side of this is of course, that if something is familiar and works the same way in the fictional world, most of the time there's no harm in using a term people know. In those cases, using alien terms just feels pretentious, and slightly changing terms just to sound a little foreign can come across as worldbuilding incompetence. Overall, I observe that the right balance was not always found but all in all things work for me.

 

@guguma:

You can't reasonably expect people to adapt to your culture if your're travelling in the domain of their's.


Edited by Ieldra, 06 May 2015 - 04:11 AM.


#68
Elerond

Elerond

    One of the Obsidian Order

  • Members
  • 2649 posts
  • Location:Finland
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer

Exactly, thus when the city was founded it was named "Merchant City" (Merchant's Haven maybe?), it was given a meaningful name, just like how every culture names everything. Just as the Mississippi example.

 

 

Every place in PoE has meaningful name, even if you don't know what that meaning is. They have alien sound because of that, and that alien sound makes setting feel much better than using some English phrases, because that would drop history behind the setting.

 

It is similar mechanic that Tolkien used in Middle-Earth to make it feel that it has history behind it. If you don't appreciate such effort fine, but in my opinion you don't just understand what makes good setting. 



#69
FlintlockJazz

FlintlockJazz

    White Rabbit of the Obsidian Order

  • Members
  • 1959 posts
  • Location:Pocket Domain in the Outer Astral Plane
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer
  • Black Isle Bastard!

 


I wonder why people find it hard to read, interpret and dwell on what they are about to say before speaking their mind.

I am entitled to state my opinion about the game or the setting, whether it is negative or positive, and that is exactly what I am doing here. There is nothing daring about that. I might as well say that I do not enjoy guns or monks being in a fantasy world, I did not, but I sure can.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

"I am trying to draw attention to pseudo-language vs. other forms of creativity and elements of immersion, where both uses resources from the same pool and stating that in my opinion other forms of creativity and elements of immersion adds more value to a product compared to utilizing a pseudo-language." 

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

If one is not entitled to speak what they do not like, then every creation must be accepted as flawless, whether it is an art, or a book, or a game, or a fantasy setting or a piece of music.

 

First you take on this zealous attitude of defending what is already there (some do this blindly, some actually provide reasons which is perfectly fine), then you wonder why products of the gaming industry have become so shallow, so cliche!

 

Consumer 1: "I do not enjoy what is done with the language"

 

Consumer Mob: "It is perfectly fine, you do not understand what you are talking about"

 

Consumer 2: "I think combat could be better"

 

Consumer Mob: "No it is perfectly fine, you are stupid, if you can do better do it yourself ...rabble rabble..."

 

Consumer 3: "It seems to me you skimmed off from the storytelling"

 

Consumer Mob: "...rabble rabble...We like it, it is the perfect length, do not play it if you do not like it ...rabble rabble..."

 

Consumer 4: "I believe classes and abilities need improvement, it lacks some complexity"

 

Consumer Mob: "...rabble rabble... no it does not, you need to get used to it ..rabble rabble..."

 

Now if I were a game developer and I saw this, I would feel absolutely no pressure of thriving to make a better product release, I have done just fine. In fact I can even do less and people will love it anyhow.

 

Same goes with art, literature, movies, music etc...

 

 

 

Then why did you declare how Fantasy worked hmmm?  Because you did, you made a sweeping statement about how fantasy should work, and I called you out on it.  I did not zealously defend the game, nice strawman, I called you out on a fallacious statement of yours.  Feel free to apologise whenever

 

Now, onto your false dichotomy, which was an obvious attempt at diverting away from above but I feel like having fun deconstructing you, about not criticising something leading to shallow games, no one stated that you can't criticise, but first of all your opinion on the use of language in the game is purely your preferences, I LIKE the use of language and naming in this game, so how does your criticism improve it?  On the contrary, your criticism actually tries to make the game more like everything else and therefore more shallow.  Nice job.  Second, who the hell said not to criticise the game?  Strawmanning again are we?


Edited by FlintlockJazz, 06 May 2015 - 04:48 AM.

  • kaiki and Ineth like this

#70
Exile2k4

Exile2k4

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 29 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer

The problem I found with the language in the game wasn't really with any specific name or term, but rather that there was a tendency to use multiple unfamiliar terms in a sentence which inhibited deriving meaning by context. If you have a sentence like "I met dasbasdiyb yesterday and they were upset with you" you can infer that it's probably a person's name, and something of what's going on. If you have a sentence like "dasnkdasun was in a adwiawdih with aindsida in adsuindasnu!" it's harder to pick up what each of these things is, not just because there are four times as many things to learn but because each lacks the contextual cues. Games like this tend to be fairly long, which is great, but I don't really have the free time to learn the range of peoples, places, creatures, gods & phenomena before starting, and for me personally it made parts of the game (particularly the opening) more opaque than engaging.



#71
Dadalama

Dadalama

    (3) Conjurer

  • Members
  • 148 posts

 

 


I wonder why people find it hard to read, interpret and dwell on what they are about to say before speaking their mind.

I am entitled to state my opinion about the game or the setting, whether it is negative or positive, and that is exactly what I am doing here. There is nothing daring about that. I might as well say that I do not enjoy guns or monks being in a fantasy world, I did not, but I sure can.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

"I am trying to draw attention to pseudo-language vs. other forms of creativity and elements of immersion, where both uses resources from the same pool and stating that in my opinion other forms of creativity and elements of immersion adds more value to a product compared to utilizing a pseudo-language." 

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

If one is not entitled to speak what they do not like, then every creation must be accepted as flawless, whether it is an art, or a book, or a game, or a fantasy setting or a piece of music.

 

First you take on this zealous attitude of defending what is already there (some do this blindly, some actually provide reasons which is perfectly fine), then you wonder why products of the gaming industry have become so shallow, so cliche!

 

Consumer 1: "I do not enjoy what is done with the language"

 

Consumer Mob: "It is perfectly fine, you do not understand what you are talking about"

 

Consumer 2: "I think combat could be better"

 

Consumer Mob: "No it is perfectly fine, you are stupid, if you can do better do it yourself ...rabble rabble..."

 

Consumer 3: "It seems to me you skimmed off from the storytelling"

 

Consumer Mob: "...rabble rabble...We like it, it is the perfect length, do not play it if you do not like it ...rabble rabble..."

 

Consumer 4: "I believe classes and abilities need improvement, it lacks some complexity"

 

Consumer Mob: "...rabble rabble... no it does not, you need to get used to it ..rabble rabble..."

 

Now if I were a game developer and I saw this, I would feel absolutely no pressure of thriving to make a better product release, I have done just fine. In fact I can even do less and people will love it anyhow.

 

Same goes with art, literature, movies, music etc...

 

 

 

Then why did you declare how Fantasy worked hmmm?  Because you did, you made a sweeping statement about how fantasy should work, and I called you out on it.  I did not zealously defend the game, nice strawman, I called you out on a fallacious statement of yours.  Feel free to apologise whenever

 

Now, onto your false dichotomy, which was an obvious attempt at diverting away from above but I feel like having fun deconstructing you, about not criticising something leading to shallow games, no one stated that you can't criticise, but first of all your opinion on the use of language in the game is purely your preferences, I LIKE the use of language and naming in this game, so how does your criticism improve it?  On the contrary, your criticism actually tries to make the game more like everything else and therefore more shallow.  Nice job.  Second, who the hell said not to criticise the game?  Strawmanning again are we?

 

Well much more simply put that is "your criticism is not immune to criticism".

 

@guguma

Nobody is breaking knees for saying they don't like something. Nobody is telling you you can't talk. Just as you are allowed to criticize so is everyone allowed to criticize you.


  • Ineth likes this

#72
guguma

guguma

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Backer

Then why did you declare how Fantasy worked hmmm?  Because you did, you made a sweeping statement about how fantasy should work, and I called you out on it.  I did not zealously defend the game, nice strawman, I called you out on a fallacious statement of yours.  Feel free to apologise whenever


1) Quote my statement where I oh so blatantly declared how fantasy should work.
 
2) If you are trying to deconstruct me make a meaningful statement about:

"I am trying to draw attention to pseudo-language vs. other forms of creativity and elements of immersion, where both uses resources from the same pool and stating that in my opinion other forms of creativity and elements of immersion adds more value to a product compared to utilizing a pseudo-language."

---------------------------  

The problem I found with the language in the game wasn't really with any specific name or term, but rather that there was a tendency to use multiple unfamiliar terms in a sentence which inhibited deriving meaning by context. If you have a sentence like "I met dasbasdiyb yesterday and they were upset with you" you can infer that it's probably a person's name, and something of what's going on. If you have a sentence like "dasnkdasun was in a adwiawdih with aindsida in adsuindasnu!" it's harder to pick up what each of these things is, not just because there are four times as many things to learn but because each lacks the contextual cues. Games like this tend to be fairly long, which is great, but I don't really have the free time to learn the range of peoples, places, creatures, gods & phenomena before starting, and for me personally it made parts of the game (particularly the opening) more opaque than engaging.

 
Agreed.

---------------------------
@Ieldra:

---
@guguma:

You can't reasonably expect people to adapt to your culture if your're travelling in the domain of their's.
---

I think you misunderstood my sarcasm, if you are referring to my statement about traveling through Denmark.

#73
Tigranes

Tigranes

    Obsidian VIP

  • Members
  • 10491 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer

I'd like to see an example of a sentence in-game that is loaded with so many unfamiliar terms you can't make out what it means. 

 

And no, being 'confused' by duc doesn't count, because it's pretty easy to figure it out whether you know the actual historical relationship or not. 

 

Nobody should be expected to know the etymology of duke/duc of vampire/fampyr. It was only raised because you made an erroneous argument that such derivations are nonsensical.



#74
FlintlockJazz

FlintlockJazz

    White Rabbit of the Obsidian Order

  • Members
  • 1959 posts
  • Location:Pocket Domain in the Outer Astral Plane
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer
  • Black Isle Bastard!

 

Then why did you declare how Fantasy worked hmmm?  Because you did, you made a sweeping statement about how fantasy should work, and I called you out on it.  I did not zealously defend the game, nice strawman, I called you out on a fallacious statement of yours.  Feel free to apologise whenever


1) Quote my statement where I oh so blatantly declared how fantasy should work.
 
2) If you are trying to deconstruct me make a meaningful statement about:

"I am trying to draw attention to pseudo-language vs. other forms of creativity and elements of immersion, where both uses resources from the same pool and stating that in my opinion other forms of creativity and elements of immersion adds more value to a product compared to utilizing a pseudo-language."
 

1. http://forums.obsidi...ting/?p=1684373

 

Do not cross the barrier between a fantasy world and the real one. Languages evolve, thus some utterance ends up being "beef". There is no justification for such evolution in a fantasy world.

 

So here you have made the statement that we should not 'cross the barrier' between real and fantasy.  Why not?  What gives you the right to make such an assertation?  And what exactly qualifies as 'fantasy' and not 'reality'?  Lots of reality in fantasy I'm sorry to say, did you know swords are real?  And then you finish off with the statement that there is no justification for such evolution in a fantasy world, based on what exactly?  Last time I checked, a fantasy world is constructed according to the rules established by the author, not some authority such as yourself who dictates what can and cannot be in fantasy.

 

2.  There is nothing meaningful to be said about that because there is nothing meaningful about it.  No attention is needed to be brought to it because it is something you either like or don't, the only issue is that you seem to think that because you don't like it then it's obviously something wrong, when it's really just a matter of taste (and your lack of it :p ).


  • Dadalama likes this

#75
Mhantra

Mhantra

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 8 posts

I find the world to be wonderfully designed, with great balance between the familar, the new, and the "familiaresque," which I think is what is bothering OP.  Of course, I am, "that guy," who tries to pronounce the names of all the Spanish named streets and cities in their Spanish/Mexican pronunciation...and am considered a complete outsider by the locals even though I was a local (lol).   But what has been said above by some rings true, try to learn the culture and then you will start to recognize the words as not abnormal at all. 

 

Sure, maybe this world is similar to past worlds, but it is a whole new world with different cultures and it takes some time learn it.  But here is a quesion:

 

How many of the history books did you read? I am totally fine with someone not reading the history books, I totally get that...but if you haven't, then perhaps you have lost a little of your credential to "review" the setting.  Not that it is completely invalid, but I would be curious to see an honest review from someone who spent a lot of time reading and learning about the history of the world and where the modern (in game) world has come from.


Edited by Mhantra, 07 May 2015 - 10:06 AM.


#76
abaris

abaris

    (5) Thaumaturgist

  • Members
  • 559 posts

 

 

Well but Copenhagen isn't the real name it's København.  It's just foreigners to Scandinavia that call it Copenhagen.  In old norse it's called Kaupmannahøfn which literally means Merchant City. So for me calling things something other than standard english words is no problem

 

 

Well, yeah. Vienna isn't the name of my city either. It's Wien, which again is derived from the Roman Vindobona. There has to be some kind of convention. Especially when it's a game where you don't go through volumes of history books to look up how any name came to be.



#77
Tigranes

Tigranes

    Obsidian VIP

  • Members
  • 10491 posts
  • Pillars of Eternity Silver Backer
  • Kickstarter Backer
  • Deadfire Backer
  • Fig Backer

Anyone who has some familiarity with how such things work, know very well that it's a normal and ordinary feature of all languages. 

 

As abaris says, having some conventions really makes it easier to tell. And we see various such conventional uses in POE: gul & Darghul, or the clearly Italian grammar of everything said by the Vailians, the relation between Glanfathans and Eir Glanfath, etc. 



#78
cirdanx

cirdanx

    (4) Theurgist

  • Members
  • 200 posts
  • Location:Austria
  • Steam:cirdanx

The first part made me angry, then i read everything. :)

 

I don´t actually agree with the naming part, we can easily scrap that under the rug, fffs Tolkien stole his names happily. If you think they look like crap, thats fine, infact i do agree with you that more practical names would stick more with people. As you said, i remember watchers keep, but i don´t really remember any dungeon or zone except twin elms in PoE...nope none.

 

Everything has influence from fantasy as we know it, but the naming hm. I don´t know, as i said i don´t remember them, but as a hobby writer (yeah that doesnt mean **** i know) i do take care to name places so people can keep it in their heads.

 

You do have some valid points, and like you, i also hope the build upon that game and come out with a second. (or the expansion they are working on)

 

I would still give the setting a bit more credit, even if the wording sucks, it´s kinda interesting (another take on a patheon but i like it). We do have some very good writing in that game.


  • wkal likes this

#79
MuseBreaks

MuseBreaks

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 32 posts
  • Location:Israel
  • Pillars of Eternity Backer

I agree 100% percent. The story and setting are dull and uninteresting and are nowhere near Baldur's Gate 2. I hoped for something epic and we got mediocre at best.

 

I will also add that although I do agree with what you said about the language, I think it's only secondary to the overall plot and setting and such. I could have forgiven the language if there was a sense of the epic feeling and interest I had in the Baldur's Gate 2 plot and setting. But there wasn't, so it's all nothing but one big mediocre gray game in terms of plot and setting.


Edited by MuseBreaks, 08 May 2015 - 04:53 AM.


#80
Grinch

Grinch

    (1) Prestidigitator

  • Members
  • 45 posts

The thing that bothers me with the language is that it immerses you with fantasy name changes  but then at times uses locker room profanity. DA:I does the same thing. It's almost as if the writers were 12 year olds trying to see how many curse words they could get away with. Don't know about anybody else but I lose immersion when it's like that. I don't mind profanity in games but have a reason for the profanity. The Hanging Tree dialogue between you and the dignitary ends up with what I believe is profanity for no reason. All the way through the conversation the dignitary acts in a proper manner then all of a sudden blurts out a profanity in the course of the conversation. To me it didn't make any sense.

 

Aloth's confrontation in front of the inn is the same way. No doubt Aloth insulted the villagers but it didn't come close to what you are supposed to have heard him say which was a profanity. My point is it didn't have to be there. It was clear Aloth was throwing insults. It's as if profanity was thrown in just for the sake of doing it. It's supposed to be a fantasy setting not a locker room


  • wkal likes this





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: review, lore, setting, language

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users