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fgalkin

Inspiration for the Dyrwood

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Is it just be, or did did anyone else notice that Dyrwood is basically a complete set of negative stereotypes about the USA set during the Renaissance? I mean, it has things like "former colony that still fetishizes their revolution centuries ago," "being a global leader in animancy research, while having a massive fear and distrust of same," "freeing the slaves, then keeping them down through racism and economic explotation," "massive religious persecution by out of control populist groups that basically defy and distrust all authority that is not themselves," "have a massive program of domestic surveillance led by Lady J.Edgar Hoover," "ended a war with a magical nuke," "love guns (and Magran)," and, of course, "have a bad relationship with the natives, due to a history of displacing them by wholesale slaughter."

 

Do you think it was intentional by Obsidian? 

 

Have a very nice day.

-fgalkin

Edited by fgalkin
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It was very intentional. Dyrwood = USA. I found it was a very interesting take as, it seems, most fantasy settings are set in an inspired Europe. To have the setting in an inspired America gives a slightly different feel. The immigration, the attacks on the native population, hostility and idolization of nobility. Great stuff.

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The Saints War is basically the US Civil War. Or as they call it in Readceras, the War of Southern Aggression.

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The Saints War is basically the US Civil War. Or as they call it in Readceras, the War of Southern Aggression.

That's really reaching. The civil war was not primarily a religious war (it only barely was religious do to some propaganda). It was pure economics on both sides.

 

The saint's war is more like the crusades then anything.


It's good to criticize things you love.

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It was based on the USA, but I don't feel like it was as negative a portrayal as you make it out.  For one thing, they were far kinder to their natives than the US was, even including the war of burnt trees.  For another, Pallegina particularly makes a big deal about how its an engine of new ideas.  Finally, they haven't really fought an imperialist war in this.

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Readceras is Canada (never left the empire, see) mixed with Puritanism (they even mention the Readceran work ethic at some point). So, basically the War of 1812 mixed with the Civil War. Which makes the Dozens... the KKK? Damn, I think I sided with the KKK in my last playthrough. I was just going for completionism...

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I think people get too caught up in the specifics. While it may be based on America it isn't a laundry list of things to represent.

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It's good to criticize things you love.

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"ended a war with a magical nuke,"

 

Damn, I didn't pick up on that similarity, but now that you mention it, yeah, probably not a coincidence.

 

 

"have a bad relationship with the natives, due to a history of displacing them by wholesale slaughter."

 

Well, the Glanfathans did their fair share of slaughtering. Didn't both of the wars (Broken Stone War, and War of Black Trees) start when Glanfathans launched an assault against Dyrwoodan villages, murdering all civilians in the ones they raided?

 

Since the Glanfathans' stated motivation for those assaults wasn't self-preservation, but rather along the lines of "they hurt our religious feelings because some individuals from their midst trespassed on some ruins built by yet another civilization", I don't really think they fit the whole "poor innocent oppressed natives" stereotype.

Edited by Ineth

"Some ideas are so stupid that only an intellectual could believe them." -- attributed to George Orwell

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idolization of nobility

 

That's not exactly a signature American thing though.

It has been (and in some ways still is) much more prevalent in Europe.


"Some ideas are so stupid that only an intellectual could believe them." -- attributed to George Orwell

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Oh, absolutely. It's right there in the Aloth's accent.

 

It was based on the USA, but I don't feel like it was as negative a portrayal as you make it out.  For one thing, they were far kinder to their natives than the US was, even including the war of burnt trees.  For another, Pallegina particularly makes a big deal about how its an engine of new ideas.  Finally, they haven't really fought an imperialist war in this.

 

Agree. The Dyrwood actually seems to be a pretty decent place when its society isn't crumbling into dust due to years spent with barely any infants born.

 

One could argue this is a big part of the reason that Thaos goes after it. While we hear a lot about a couple of bad events in Dyrwoodan history, the lore reveals a pretty dynamic nation with a lot to be said for it. Particularly threatening to the Engwithan agenda is the interplay between Dyrwood and Eir Glanfath, a relationship which seems to have prompted tremendous social and scientific progress in both nations since Hadret's time. Dyrwoodan knowledge of animancy is problematic for Thaos, but what's even worse is that Dyrwoodan animancers are sharing knowledge with Glanfathan mystics, which is a group he really can't afford to lose.

 

I think people get too caught up in the specifics. While it may be based on America it isn't a laundry list of things to represent.

 

This. It parallels the nation, yes, but not really any specific points in its history. Broad strokes.

Edited by gkathellar
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If I'm typing in red, it means I'm being sarcastic. But not this time.

Dark green, on the other hand, is for jokes and irony in general.

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idolization of nobility

 

That's not exactly a signature American thing though.

It has been (and in some ways still is) much more prevalent in Europe.

 

 

Hostility and idolization, there is a dual nature. Not sure about Europe but Americans are aware of how there's a fascination with foreign (ie British) nobility while at the same time stating that our ideals are opposed to nobility at the same time. This plays out with the crucible knights and the dozens pretty well. The Dozens hate all things noble while the crucible knights want to be nobles themselves.

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'Cept for the whole pantheon thing, of course, which wasn't around in the Renaissance or the U.S. Or reincarnation.


"It has just been discovered that research causes cancer in rats."

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'Cept for the whole pantheon thing, of course, which wasn't around in the Renaissance or the U.S. Or reincarnation.

Well, yes? But we're talking about culture (and the history that shaped that culture). I mean, I don't think anyone here will dispute that the Valian Republics are based on Renaissance Italy, for example, or that Eír Glanfath is heavily inspired by the Celts? 

 

Have a very nice day.

-fgalkin

 

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