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Obsidian's ideas for a new Kickstarter (3rd Part RPS interview)


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Episodic content is garbage. I'm not backing it and would never buy anything less than a complete game.

 

 

Episodic garbage means they've mismanaged funds and are hoping to complete the game with funds from a piece of a game that in essence puts the entire game in danger of never seeing an end or getting very poor quality completion. I don't care what they say or promise, the moment the word "episodic" comes in I am out and that's the end of that nonsense.

 

 

So I guess you don't watch TV series either, read book series or watch movies that require a sequel to get the full story out...

 

And why the **** would you think that episodic means someone has been mismanaging funds?

 

1) It's a way to get a bigger game out in parts that could take otherwise way way too long for the fans. Case example Half-Life Episodes (and yes, I know the 3rd part still hasn't come out). But imagine if the game fans were still waiting for Half-Life 3 since they didn't release the games as episodic content. And well since Valve is Valve, I doubt they were in dire need for cash either.

 

2) It's a way to test if there's a market/fans for a new game idea. Less of a risk, especially if funded by the developer. Producing 5x 10-15 hour episodic games vs. 1x 50-75 hour game.  Kickstart episode 1 of the said game, and release next ones with whatever profit you are making with Kickstarted Episode 1.

 

3) From a marketing point a view it's also pretty damn good idea. You get five times the exposure in reviews, previews etc. if you do 5 episodes compared to the 1 game you would do. Sure, the costs for marketing campaing might go up, but still your product is featured more often with fresh content instead of just showing a new trailer of the same game you've been marketing for the last year.

 

4) For a new customer it's easier to buy something that costs 10-20 dollars than something that costs 50 dollars. I personally would have never paid 50 dollars for any TellTale's games since I had no idea if I would actually like their style of games. But since they release them one episode at a time, it's easier for me to throw ten bucks at the company and test out their games. And I imagine I'm not the only one, seeing how popular their games have turned out little by little.

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Hate the living, love the dead.

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While many people consider the Walking Dead series very good one of the main problems during release was delayed release.  Just like the crying that happened here when the "big announcement" didn't come there was a lot of crying by fans of the Walking Dead when some episodes didn't appear when expected or were outright delayed.  Telltale lost a lot of good will with fans who had purchased a Season Pass as they had effectively paid in advance for something that didn't materialize, of course it all arrived eventually but once that good will is gone it is very hard to rebuild it with those same fans, no matter how good your game is.  So some people are not sold on the episodic release model.

 

I understand that making something episodically involves working on the next episode during and after the release of the last one but it doesn't bode well for that model in the future if fans are going to get frustrated with it and bring their frustrations from one episodic game to another.

 

Personally the idea of a 50 or 60 hr game sounds good, it is about the average for a decent game.  However playing 10hrs in April and then having to wait until June for another 10hrs just doesn't seem attractive and that is without considering any delays.  I'd be more likely to wait until the entire series is released and get it then or not get it at all.  It took Telltale 8 months to release 15hrs of gameplay, imagine trying to stay interested in a 60hr game release episodically.

 

Also it would seem to me that the model only really suits some game types, like linear story, a more open world would be a total joke as an episodic release.

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I don't think episodic content means failure, but I also don't think it's a great way to make an RPG.  Episodic means linear or fairly unsatisfying exploration.  I think the format would diminish one of Obsidian's great strengths, which is their amazing world-building ability.  Furthermore, usually the slow-trickle of information from episodic games leaves me vaguely unsatisified until I've completed the series.

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Considering episodic releases: I'm not completely against it, but Feargus Urquhart's example wouldn't be my choice. If a game would need to be divided, it should only be tripled and offer at least 20-25 hours of gameplay per episode. The more important question for me would be if areas would be left seperated from another or if the following episode could really expand the game as a whole. Simply speaking: Would these epsiodes really emerge to one bigger game or would they feel to be seperated? The first choice is acceptable for me, the second isn't - and right now most epsiodic games use the seperated approach ;(

Thinking of a "Skyrim-like" experience I have my doubts, too. I'm just not a fan of Bethesdas style of offering vast narratives but lacking in telling an interesting main plot and creating deeper main characters. FONV succeeded over FO3 for me, but the main plot also wasn't that good.

If Obsidian would really choose such an approach, my willingness to back a new KS campaign would depend from the setting. Everything that's just a variation of the typical world of Tolkien and DnD - no more Elves please - or an universe like Mass Effect doesn't really need the help of us and both worlds are so worn-out for me.

I really wished, that a new KS would offer a world that would be more fresh for RPGs. Perhaps a Western scenario that could use steampunk elements, a dimension

similar of the time of the American and French Revolution or as my favourite a scenario playing in the ancient world where greek and roman mythology could offer enough inspiration for races and magical elements.

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Maybe a geographically episodic skyrim like game could work, Imagine  a game as big as the dlc Dragonborn, every 6 months the release another  island/plan of existence/duchy (or whatever contrivance they use to explain the  game) Each separate    episode could have a  main quest and  side quests resolved within it plus  a deeper main quest that carries over.

yeah that could work.

Personally I would love something with deep characters and factions of Obsidian coupled with the graphics, vistas and   broad scope of a TES game.

 

I also think they  seeing the  still quite impressive New Vegas sale numbers and  community support plus the  Eternity kickstarter    success that publishers would love to do  a deal with Obsidian.

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Skyrim isn't even a good game (at least for me). Too much is getting lost in Open World games in terms of narrative, story, reactivity and Roleplay term is getting dumbed by infintie crafts, scooping infinite dungeons that are similar and boring, no character development, and very few meaningful choices.

 

I mean, if it would really be something that can blow my mind, where I can chose nations that I support, where I grow in status and power, where I can buy different parts of lands and make my "strongholds" there and become  true lord of given lands, or just go and continue my story as some sell sword or even a merchant that grows influence in various lands etc. and moves from early adventuring to sending adventuring parties to do his bidding, etc....

 

Nah, I just do not buy Open World stuff.... narrative and story suffered in each of those games so far. Perhaps TW3 will change my mind (although I doubt) and I do not even intend to buy DA:I after all the fiascos from BW starting with ME2 and from what I've seen in gameplay videos so far.

 

If they are going to go for the next KS project. I want it to blow my mind with story, and world reactivity that is covered in a superb narrative sauce.

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Episodic content is garbage. I'm not backing it and would never buy anything less than a complete game.

 

 

Episodic garbage means they've mismanaged funds and are hoping to complete the game with funds from a piece of a game that in essence puts the entire game in danger of never seeing an end or getting very poor quality completion. I don't care what they say or promise, the moment the word "episodic" comes in I am out and that's the end of that nonsense.

 

 

So I guess you don't watch TV series either, read book series or watch movies that require a sequel to get the full story out...

 

And why the **** would you think that episodic means someone has been mismanaging funds?

 

1) It's a way to get a bigger game out in parts that could take otherwise way way too long for the fans. Case example Half-Life Episodes (and yes, I know the 3rd part still hasn't come out). But imagine if the game fans were still waiting for Half-Life 3 since they didn't release the games as episodic content. And well since Valve is Valve, I doubt they were in dire need for cash either.

 

2) It's a way to test if there's a market/fans for a new game idea. Less of a risk, especially if funded by the developer. Producing 5x 10-15 hour episodic games vs. 1x 50-75 hour game.  Kickstart episode 1 of the said game, and release next ones with whatever profit you are making with Kickstarted Episode 1.

 

3) From a marketing point a view it's also pretty damn good idea. You get five times the exposure in reviews, previews etc. if you do 5 episodes compared to the 1 game you would do. Sure, the costs for marketing campaing might go up, but still your product is featured more often with fresh content instead of just showing a new trailer of the same game you've been marketing for the last year.

 

4) For a new customer it's easier to buy something that costs 10-20 dollars than something that costs 50 dollars. I personally would have never paid 50 dollars for any TellTale's games since I had no idea if I would actually like their style of games. But since they release them one episode at a time, it's easier for me to throw ten bucks at the company and test out their games. And I imagine I'm not the only one, seeing how popular their games have turned out little by little

I don't watch TV the way you'd think no. I watch series after they are completely finished. Too many have extremely poor endings or no endings at all because they are no planned to end....they are planned to keep selling and selling and when their ratings start to drop the creators don't work towards giving it a proper ending but towards getting everyone excited again so when the imminent doom is inevitable they scramble together a poor excuse for an ending.

 

Well in the case of Double Fine Adventure it's easy to say exactly why funds were mismanaged: they admitted the 3.3 mil(800%) funding they got from KS is not enough to finish the game....basically they're going to be broke way too early....so they are going to sell half the game and finish the second half using the profits. But what if it doesn't sell? Or what if it sells really poor? That puts at risk everything....the backers could easily end up left with half a game or receive a severely sub-par second half. And the project was backed for 800% to original asking!!! The biggest question then remains....what would they have done if they barely made what they asked for if they can't manage with eight times as much?

 

1) Way too long for the fans? That's a joke right? I decide what's too long, when I play and for how long I play. I couldn't care less if the game took 1000 hours to complete, I do NOT and will NEVER pay for a part of a game. I won't back and won't buy.

 

2) Poor way to "test" because many like me couldn't care less if it's the greatest thing ever and walks on water, I don't buy unfinished content. I would only even start considering it after the final episode is out and production is done. Even then I would start to look into whether it had a quality ending before dropping a cent. Besides, Kickstarter itself is a tool designed to measure interest....no need to further compromise the game.

 

3) Five times exposure? That's assuming each outlet will run a story every time a chapter is released....bad assumption. And then there's a huge industry statistic that less than 20% of the people who buy a game(as in a complete one) ever actually finish it. Most get distracted and lost along the way. If they want extra coverage they should do more honest expansions like the one they have planned for after they finish the game, not ship an unfinished game.

 

4) These won't be $50 dollar games even complete, PoE is $35 and neither Wasteland 2 nor TToN will be $50. If they are that concerned with providing a cheap way to try a game they should do a free demo....nothing beats the price of free for a trial.

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Skyrim isn't even a good game (at least for me). Too much is getting lost in Open World games in terms of narrative, story, reactivity and Roleplay term is getting dumbed by infintie crafts, scooping infinite dungeons that are similar and boring, no character development, and very few meaningful choices.

 

I mean, if it would really be something that can blow my mind, where I can chose nations that I support, where I grow in status and power, where I can buy different parts of lands and make my "strongholds" there and become  true lord of given lands, or just go and continue my story as some sell sword or even a merchant that grows influence in various lands etc. and moves from early adventuring to sending adventuring parties to do his bidding, etc....

 

Nah, I just do not buy Open World stuff.... narrative and story suffered in each of those games so far. Perhaps TW3 will change my mind (although I doubt) and I do not even intend to buy DA:I after all the fiascos from BW starting with ME2 and from what I've seen in gameplay videos so far.

 

If they are going to go for the next KS project. I want it to blow my mind with story, and world reactivity that is covered in a superb narrative sauce.

 

I agree. Skyrim is the most definitive example of what modern RPGs are currently doing.  The whole charm of kickstarter has been getting away from that nonsense and back to what made the late 90s-early 2000s cRPGs so good.

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As with several others posting here, I am going to have to say "no dice" to Episodic Content, but please consider sticking with open world (at least for any large-scale RPG's).

 

On the subject of Kickstarters, the format seems to have worked for inExile, but the one thing I would do differently is offer potential backers the ability to play a demo of Pillars of Eternity. This would allow players to see what Obsidian accomplished in it's previous offerings. Those who like what they've seen in Pillars (or other games in the future), might have more incentive to back future Kickstarters (even if, to use a current example, Pillars of Eternity's kickstarter has barely been a year into having ended its kickstarter).

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I have to say I am also leery about doing another kickstarter when I have not yet seen the fruits of labor from POE, that said I would happily back again if the beta is out beforehand where I can see what it is like from streamers/youtube videos.  As long as I have something to be able to judge how well spent the kickstarter was.

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I have to say I am also leery about doing another kickstarter when I have not yet seen the fruits of labor from POE, that said I would happily back again if the beta is out beforehand where I can see what it is like from streamers/youtube videos.  As long as I have something to be able to judge how well spent the kickstarter was.

I think most will agree and that this is the overall most sensible sentiment even among Obsidian, not just the fans, which is why I suspect they've said next to nothing about it except they hope to be able to talk about it around March/April....by which point the Beta may presumably be out or at least we'll have seen plenty more gameplay footage.

 

The first bit of gameplay shown in the first trailer suggests that more lengthier demos may not be too far ahead and personally I am pleased with what we've seen so far.

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1) Way too long for the fans? That's a joke right? I decide what's too long, when I play and for how long I play. I couldn't care less if the game took 1000 hours to complete, I do NOT and will NEVER pay for a part of a game. I won't back and won't buy.

 

2) Poor way to "test" because many like me couldn't care less if it's the greatest thing ever and walks on water, I don't buy unfinished content. I would only even start considering it after the final episode is out and production is done. Even then I would start to look into whether it had a quality ending before dropping a cent. Besides, Kickstarter itself is a tool designed to measure interest....no need to further compromise the game.

 

3) Five times exposure? That's assuming each outlet will run a story every time a chapter is released....bad assumption. And then there's a huge industry statistic that less than 20% of the people who buy a game(as in a complete one) ever actually finish it. Most get distracted and lost along the way. If they want extra coverage they should do more honest expansions like the one they have planned for after they finish the game, not ship an unfinished game.

 

4) These won't be $50 dollar games even complete, PoE is $35 and neither Wasteland 2 nor TToN will be $50. If they are that concerned with providing a cheap way to try a game they should do a free demo....nothing beats the price of free for a trial.

 

 

1. *sigh* I did not mean the actual game content being too long. The wait time to get that said content is too long. Or do you think Half-Life fans would be really happy to have waited for years since Half-Life 2 when they are already going crazy between the wait period between Episode 2 and Episode 3? At least the fans got something to play and I never felt like I only got a part of the game or unfinished game to play. Though I think no one at Valve thought it would take this damn long to finish Episode 3, but they are Valve they can work on their games for eternity if they want to.

 

2. So you don't buy it, but others will. Yes, Kickstarter is a way to measure intrest, but if you want to create something bigger than the games we are getting now, episodic content is the key/solution if they don't want bring in publishers. There's no way an rpg can create the amount of donations Star Citizen got. Just because the game is in episodes doesn't mean the game won't have an ending. The ending will be different from a movie ending that has no sequel coming, but instead it would have a tv series cliffhanger ending which a lot of people seem to like very much. Or they could have each chapter/episode work out as a stand alone story with a proper ending. It depends a lot on how they are going to approach it.

And like you said, some people will wait for all of the episodes to come out, then so be it. There are enough people out there who are willing to pay for episodic content or there wouldn't be companies releasing their content in such a manner to begin with.

 

3. Yes five times the exposure. Yes, some magazines won't do a preview on each damn episode, but reviews on quality games are pretty much given especially on the internet for a game/episode of 10-15 hours worth of playtime.

 

4. The pricing was an example, not a set figure for crpgs currently coming out via Kickstarter. But since you brought it up, PoE will be around 50 dollars with the expansion seeing how it's being sold for about 20 dollars. I would imagine the game is complete only with all the DLCs/expansions, not with only the "vanilla" version.

Demos usually take a lot of extra time to create especially if they would make an open world game like Skyrim and you want them to create one from thin air just to see how it would be received? You do realize that they don't have unlimited amount of cash and resources to throw around.

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I ended up buying Skyrim recently because of a Steam sale, just because it had so many good reviews and so many people singing its praises. I lost interest very quickly and I haven't been able to muster up the enthusiasm to try it again. Regret wasting the money now.

 

The cost of open world is too often generic characters, generic dialogue, generic story and a generic protagonist. I created an Altmer character with an implicit background of being an anti-Thalmor rebel because I wanted to see how people would treat me differently based upon my race (like the awkwardness of being of an anti-Nazi German in the middle of the Second World War), but the answer to that question was seemingly 'not much differently at all.' My character ended up feeling like a personality-less arbitrary arrangement of stats. I find that very boring. 

 

So no, if they go the route of 2D Skyrim, I won't be backing it. I backed this project and Tides of Numenera because I'm excited for a return to an emphasis on telling a good story with interesting characters over lots and lots of generic, forgettable content. That description seems to be a major step in the wrong direction.

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1. *sigh* I did not mean the actual game content being too long. The wait time to get that said content is too long. Or do you think Half-Life fans would be really happy to have waited for years since Half-Life 2 when they are already going crazy between the wait period between Episode 2 and Episode 3? At least the fans got something to play and I never felt like I only got a part of the game or unfinished game to play. Though I think no one at Valve thought it would take this damn long to finish Episode 3, but they are Valve they can work on their games for eternity if they want to.

 

2. So you don't buy it, but others will. Yes, Kickstarter is a way to measure intrest, but if you want to create something bigger than the games we are getting now, episodic content is the key/solution if they don't want bring in publishers. There's no way an rpg can create the amount of donations Star Citizen got. Just because the game is in episodes doesn't mean the game won't have an ending. The ending will be different from a movie ending that has no sequel coming, but instead it would have a tv series cliffhanger ending which a lot of people seem to like very much. Or they could have each chapter/episode work out as a stand alone story with a proper ending. It depends a lot on how they are going to approach it.

And like you said, some people will wait for all of the episodes to come out, then so be it. There are enough people out there who are willing to pay for episodic content or there wouldn't be companies releasing their content in such a manner to begin with.

 

3. Yes five times the exposure. Yes, some magazines won't do a preview on each damn episode, but reviews on quality games are pretty much given especially on the internet for a game/episode of 10-15 hours worth of playtime.

 

4. The pricing was an example, not a set figure for crpgs currently coming out via Kickstarter. But since you brought it up, PoE will be around 50 dollars with the expansion seeing how it's being sold for about 20 dollars. I would imagine the game is complete only with all the DLCs/expansions, not with only the "vanilla" version.

Demos usually take a lot of extra time to create especially if they would make an open world game like Skyrim and you want them to create one from thin air just to see how it would be received? You do realize that they don't have unlimited amount of cash and resources to throw around.

 

 

1) I'll wait for complete content. No compromise here, will NOT buy or back incomplete content.

 

2) How many others? There's plenty opposition to the incomplete episodic proposition even on these boards and this thread. This game got 4 mil for proposing a complete game....it would have got significantly less for proposing a slice and sales are always a big unknown but generally those opposed to backing incomplete content would not buy incomplete content either. Is Obsidian willing to give the big finger to all opposing incomplete content? You won't see any opposition to complete content that's for sure, not when a basic pledge of $20 will get you the entire game.

 

3) And again, you're assuming something that is a plain fallacy. Significantly less people will buy an episode than would buy an entire game and additional coverage will not get all of them back. Nearly all games have their big sales happen in the first few days and episodes won't help. If I hear that episode 3 of some thing I didn't know about is coming out I won't care because I won't be bothered to catch up with one and two.....this is a very common trend observable in all forms of media.....TV shows, books, etc.

 

4) But that's not the same thing....every backer gets a complete game, the expansion provides more of that for those that really enjoyed it but it's not a per-requisite to enjoying the full game we get on day one and will be funded by Obsidian themselves not using KS funds. If it doesn't happen the backers won't be left with an incomplete experience.

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I ended up buying Skyrim recently because of a Steam sale, just because it had so many good reviews and so many people singing its praises. I lost interest very quickly and I haven't been able to muster up the enthusiasm to try it again. Regret wasting the money now.

 

The cost of open world is too often generic characters, generic dialogue, generic story and a generic protagonist. I created an Altmer character with an implicit background of being an anti-Thalmor rebel because I wanted to see how people would treat me differently based upon my race (like the awkwardness of being of an anti-Nazi German in the middle of the Second World War), but the answer to that question was seemingly 'not much differently at all.' My character ended up feeling like a personality-less arbitrary arrangement of stats. I find that very boring. 

 

So no, if they go the route of 2D Skyrim, I won't be backing it. I backed this project and Tides of Numenera because I'm excited for a return to an emphasis on telling a good story with interesting characters over lots and lots of generic, forgettable content. That description seems to be a major step in the wrong direction.

 

When Feargus says Skyrim, he means an open world game with Obsidian's own spices in the mix. Just look at New Vegas, it certainly didn't have generic characters or generic dialogue. Just because Bethesda makes bad open world games doesn't mean Obsidian would follow in their footsteps even if Feargus used the title Skyrim to get some recognition instead of saying "open world game".

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1. *sigh* I did not mean the actual game content being too long. The wait time to get that said content is too long. Or do you think Half-Life fans would be really happy to have waited for years since Half-Life 2 when they are already going crazy between the wait period between Episode 2 and Episode 3? At least the fans got something to play and I never felt like I only got a part of the game or unfinished game to play. Though I think no one at Valve thought it would take this damn long to finish Episode 3, but they are Valve they can work on their games for eternity if they want to.

 

2. So you don't buy it, but others will. Yes, Kickstarter is a way to measure intrest, but if you want to create something bigger than the games we are getting now, episodic content is the key/solution if they don't want bring in publishers. There's no way an rpg can create the amount of donations Star Citizen got. Just because the game is in episodes doesn't mean the game won't have an ending. The ending will be different from a movie ending that has no sequel coming, but instead it would have a tv series cliffhanger ending which a lot of people seem to like very much. Or they could have each chapter/episode work out as a stand alone story with a proper ending. It depends a lot on how they are going to approach it.

And like you said, some people will wait for all of the episodes to come out, then so be it. There are enough people out there who are willing to pay for episodic content or there wouldn't be companies releasing their content in such a manner to begin with.

 

3. Yes five times the exposure. Yes, some magazines won't do a preview on each damn episode, but reviews on quality games are pretty much given especially on the internet for a game/episode of 10-15 hours worth of playtime.

 

4. The pricing was an example, not a set figure for crpgs currently coming out via Kickstarter. But since you brought it up, PoE will be around 50 dollars with the expansion seeing how it's being sold for about 20 dollars. I would imagine the game is complete only with all the DLCs/expansions, not with only the "vanilla" version.

Demos usually take a lot of extra time to create especially if they would make an open world game like Skyrim and you want them to create one from thin air just to see how it would be received? You do realize that they don't have unlimited amount of cash and resources to throw around.

 

 

1) I'll wait for complete content. No compromise here, will NOT buy or back incomplete content.

 

2) How many others? There's plenty opposition to the incomplete episodic proposition even on these boards and this thread. This game got 4 mil for proposing a complete game....it would have got significantly less for proposing a slice and sales are always a big unknown but generally those opposed to backing incomplete content would not buy incomplete content either. Is Obsidian willing to give the big finger to all opposing incomplete content? You won't see any opposition to complete content that's for sure, not when a basic pledge of $20 will get you the entire game.

 

3) And again, you're assuming something that is a plain fallacy. Significantly less people will buy an episode than would buy an entire game and additional coverage will not get all of them back. Nearly all games have their big sales happen in the first few days and episodes won't help. If I hear that episode 3 of some thing I didn't know about is coming out I won't care because I won't be bothered to catch up with one and two.....this is a very common trend observable in all forms of media.....TV shows, books, etc.

 

4) But that's not the same thing....every backer gets a complete game, the expansion provides more of that for those that really enjoyed it but it's not a per-requisite to enjoying the full game we get on day one and will be funded by Obsidian themselves not using KS funds. If it doesn't happen the backers won't be left with an incomplete experience.

 

 

1. So you will wait while others like me will be playing the game. I'm sure your money will be appriciated later on as well. Different businessmodel means there's money coming out everytime a episode gets released and when a complete season is finished. Seems to be working just fine for Telltale with them working on multiple titles...

 

2. Yes, something like 10 people out of millions of gamers have said they would not buy episodic content. Or 10 people out of how many thousand users there are on this board... That hardly proves anything statistically. Feargus is a smart guy, he most likely has good solid information about episodic games that you and I don't have access to. That's his job after all..

Yes, this game got 4 millions. But this game was always designed to be a IE game that doesn't need to cut down to pieces to get the game out via Kickstarter, there's no reason to slice and dice Eternity and no one in their right mind would cut a game like this into episodes when you can create a huge game with just 4 millions. Open world game is a completely different beast though which is why Feargus is thinking about it.

 

3. Just like book series or tv series video games have followers as well, who will buy new content when it's out. Whether it's dlcs, expansions or episodic content. Steam etc. have made it possible to release that said episodic content since the game won't be out of the shelf after a month. It's still there, it will get featured every time on Steam when a new episode gets released (happens everytime with Telltale's games at least). The biggest Finnish gaming magazine has run reviews of each episode of Sam & Max for example.

And yes some people will wait for the season to be finished before buying. That's perfectly normal, it doesn't mean they will skip the whole game completely because it was released in smaller pieces.

 

4. Not really. Let's look Dragon Age as an example. It got an expansion. They had returning charachters from the expansion in Dragon Age 2 etc. So if you skipped the expansion, clearly you missed the "complete" Dragon Age experience from the 1st game.

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I ended up buying Skyrim recently because of a Steam sale, just because it had so many good reviews and so many people singing its praises. I lost interest very quickly and I haven't been able to muster up the enthusiasm to try it again. Regret wasting the money now.

 

The cost of open world is too often generic characters, generic dialogue, generic story and a generic protagonist. I created an Altmer character with an implicit background of being an anti-Thalmor rebel because I wanted to see how people would treat me differently based upon my race (like the awkwardness of being of an anti-Nazi German in the middle of the Second World War), but the answer to that question was seemingly 'not much differently at all.' My character ended up feeling like a personality-less arbitrary arrangement of stats. I find that very boring. 

 

So no, if they go the route of 2D Skyrim, I won't be backing it. I backed this project and Tides of Numenera because I'm excited for a return to an emphasis on telling a good story with interesting characters over lots and lots of generic, forgettable content. That description seems to be a major step in the wrong direction.

 

When Feargus says Skyrim, he means an open world game with Obsidian's own spices in the mix. Just look at New Vegas, it certainly didn't have generic characters or generic dialogue. Just because Bethesda makes bad open world games doesn't mean Obsidian would follow in their footsteps even if Feargus used the title Skyrim to get some recognition instead of saying "open world game".

 

 

If they mean a game like New Vegas, they really should say a game like New Vegas, which would leave me more favorably disposed to the idea. Name dropping Skyrim as a model throws a big wet blanket over any enthusiasm I have, and will continue to do so until I hear repeatedly 'it's an open world game, but no, it's not really all that much like Skyrim.'

 

That said, I still prefer a stronger story over another sandbox game.

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