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A New PC


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132 replies to this topic

#21
SamuraiGaijin

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If price is an issue ... Core2Duo is still a pretty good buy ... my future rig will be C2D E6600 (2.4 GHz), 975X mobo, 2GB DDR2 RAM, 250GB HDD, mid-grade VGA, etc. for well under $1300.

Take a step down (and still stick with top-name brands) ... and here's what I came up with after a quick browse on newegg:
CPU: C2D E6300: $185
Mobo: Intel 965PLTCK: $109
RAM: 2GB (2x 1GB) Kingston DDR2 667: $210
HDD: 250GB Western Digital (16MB Cache): $75
DVD+/-RW: $30
VGA: XFX (NVidia) 7900GS: $190
PSU: SilverStone 500W SLI Certified: $88

Modern, mid-range parts (not including the case): $887

You can recycle your current HDD & Burner and scale back on RAM and save $200. Take a gamble with a low-end PSU and save another $50, but the parts listed are the absolute lowest I would recommend for a gamer looking to buy a modern system with power to grow.

Edited by SamuraiGaijin, 05 December 2006 - 08:23 PM.


#22
Kroney

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yeah, but for me that means cpu + mobo + vid card + mammaries.  still almost a grand down the tubes.  if i wait it out, i can do the same for probably $500 in 6 months.  i'm not hurting now anyway.  i can run oblivion fine, as well as nwn2 and i don't play any shooters (though, even for a game like FEAR, i get 40+ fps... no need for 150 or whatever).  the next real taxing game i'm interested in buying is dragon age, and that's 18 months out.  gots time.

taks

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Mammaries??

Er, anyway. I currently have Athlon 64 3200+, AGP Geforce 6600GT, 1 gig DDR RAM and most things are still playable, although the system is starting to run out of legs.

One option is the cheaper max-out-available-tech route which would end up with me buying a 939 socket dual core Athlon, a not all that much more powerful GPU and another gig of rapidly-becoming-obsolete RAM.

On the other hand, I could take the crippingly expensive completely new tech overhaul. Intel Duo, new motherboard, PCIe GPU, DDR2 RAM. For my budget, and most of the "cheap" alternatives mentioned in this thread would be well over 500 pounds, I probably wouldn't end up with a noticeably faster machine.

It's all a bit difficult.

At any rate, anyone planning to upgrade at this time of year should wait until after Christmas. That's only common sense.

Edited by Kroney, 06 December 2006 - 06:05 AM.


#23
Rosbjerg

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I'm applying for a job that could land me 4000$ a month .. (I hope I get it!!) then I could buy a really good new Comp within 2 months! *fingers crossed*

#24
taks

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samurai's list is pretty good, though i'd still opt for the E6400 as it is only $40 or so more expensive.

kroney, you're saying essentially the same thing i'm saying. any upgrades to older architectures are obsolete in the very near future (RAM and CPU in particular) while providing very little benefit. a dual core AMD, for example, will net you the 4x00+ performance gain for sure, but the extra core does very little unless you're multitasking. the new architecture route, however, requires changing half a dozen components and quickly gets spensive.

yes, mammaries, btw. i have them on the mind at the moment. :-

taks

#25
metadigital

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what's the scoop on mobos that you're waiting on, meta?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

They haven't settled after the new CPU tech, yet. They are just a bit messy, and there is only one that has three usable PCI-e slots, for example (and the DirectX10 cards, for example, may be much better use for PhysX calculations, as it allows the calculations that are output by the GPU to be used as input).

The mobos at the moment are just too "patched" ... even the Intel-compatible ones haven't all standardized on the new standards (details escape me at the moment, the 975X chipset thinggie (Northbridge interface?): some mobos use the 965X, and are faster).

#26
Kroney

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samurai's list is pretty good, though i'd still opt for the E6400 as it is only $40 or so more expensive.

kroney, you're saying essentially the same thing i'm saying.  any upgrades to older architectures are obsolete in the very near future (RAM and CPU in particular) while providing very little benefit.  a dual core AMD, for example, will net you the 4x00+ performance gain for sure, but the extra core does very little unless you're multitasking.  the new architecture route, however, requires changing half a dozen components and quickly gets spensive.

yes, mammaries, btw.  i have them on the mind at the moment.  :p

taks

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Yeah, I'm agreeing. It's not an especially pleasant position to be in. Need to upgrade but can only upgrade to stuff that'll last maybe six months before depositing you right back to where you started.

And so do I.

#27
taks

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The mobos at the moment are just too "patched" ... even the Intel-compatible ones haven't all standardized on the new standards (details escape me at the moment, the 975X chipset thinggie (Northbridge interface?): some mobos use the 965X, and are faster).

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

which is what bums me out about the decline of AMD. they're using the HT interface, removing the bridges, and it is incredibly fast (and reliable). they just need to get their cores up to snuff. from what i've seen of their roadmap, nothing major is planned other than more cores per chip.

taks

#28
taks

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And so do I.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

i managed to solve my problem last night. :aiee:

taks

#29
metadigital

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The mobos at the moment are just too "patched" ... even the Intel-compatible ones haven't all standardized on the new standards (details escape me at the moment, the 975X chipset thinggie (Northbridge interface?): some mobos use the 965X, and are faster).

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

which is what bums me out about the decline of AMD. they're using the HT interface, removing the bridges, and it is incredibly fast (and reliable). they just need to get their cores up to snuff. from what i've seen of their roadmap, nothing major is planned other than more cores per chip.

taks

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The whole mobo situation reminds me of the X1800 debacle ... I fully expect it to be rectified really soon (now that the latest Intel platform is out).

Also, rumour has it that AMD might be exaggerating their current CPU woes ...

#30
taks

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oh, as in there may be some "double secret probation" type roadmap that even they do not know about? that would be cool.

taks

#31
metadigital

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Like the nVidia "We aren't going to have the 8800GTx card ready before January," type situation. :)

#32
Gorth

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I guess I'm joining the bandwagon of those who are considering building a new system...

I need something that is a) fast and 2) stable.

I've had a look at the new quad core technology and searched around a bit to see if there were any motherboards around that would support dual processors with quad core cpus (i.e. for a total of 8 cores) but couldn't really find any. Perhaps I'm just looking in the wrong places.

I've got some applications that are optimised for multiprocessor environments, so I would (I assume) benefit from multiple cores.

Since I would like to use the machine for gaming as well, what is the current most bang for the buck gfx cards out there? I've only ever used first matrox then nvidia cards. I've never really had any issues ever with compatibility, neither with games nor with opengl compliance for the gfx software. ATI has a more dubious reputation with it's drivers...

Will Windows XP Professional handle the multiple cores/cpus or is that server OS territory only?

I'm so *not* going to buy into the Windows Vista thing :ph34r:

Oh, and I won't need it before March, 2007, so if there is some new technology on the doorstep of 2007, so much the better.

Any recommendations what to look/search for, pretending that price doesn't matter ?

#33
metadigital

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The ATi X1950 Pro is the best budget card (130) or also GeForce 7900GS (160), and the nVidia XFX 7950GT XT2 (210) is the best single PCI-e card ... excepting the new 8800GS and GTX are better for next year (they handle the pre-DX10 rendering better than any other cards).

ATi is due to release its DX10 GPU first quarter 2007, and it is apparently a more streamlined design than the nVidia version, though the DX10 specification is much more detailed and robust so there is no room for deviation of interpretation of execution of the graphics instructions, so take that as you will.

The current Intel Quad Core CPUs are just two dual cores glued together, thus losing all the benefits of shared cache, etc (cue the Northbridge bottleneck, again). This will be rectified early next year with the "true" Quad core CPUs.

AMD is due to release a new CPU design early next year, too.

I have already stated my dissatisfaction with the current state of motherboard specifications.

Of course, if you want a bling rig, here is Custom PC's recommendation (extreme and budget):
  • CPU
    2.66GHz Intel Core 2 Extreme QX6700 773.09
    2.4GHz Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 211.32
  • motherboard
    Asus P5B Deluxe WiFi-AP 128.53
    Gigabyte GA 965P-S3
  • Graphics card
    XFX GeForce 7950 GX2 M520 Extreme Edition 379.34
    EVGA GeForce 7900GS KO 157.69
  • Memory
    2 x 1GB Patriot PDC22G6400 LLK 245.85
    2 x 1GB G.Skill F2-6400PHU2-2GBHZ
  • Hard disks
    Western Digital Raptor 150 162.14
    750GB Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 260.60

    300GB Samsung Spinpoint T HD300LJ 63.02
  • Chassis (nota bene: these case is a large one to allow for the water cooling system)
    Silverstone TJ07 239.09
    Coolermaster Stacker 810 108.26
  • PSU
    650W Seasonic S12-650+ 110.86
    500W FSP Sparkle Blue Storm AX-500-A 58.27
Water-cooling gear:
  • CPU and GPU Blocks
    Innovatec G-Flow (LGA775) 70.38
    Innovatec Cool-Matic (GeForce 7950 GX2) 165.55
  • Chipset block
    Swiftech MCW30 universal chipset block 27.31
  • Radiators
    Thermochill PA120.3 triple 120mm radiator 56.99
    Vadim LiquoCool Extreme 92mm radiator 25.40
  • Pump
    Swiftech DD12V-D5 (" Interior Diameter) 58.14
  • Reservoir
    Repack Cooling 5" reservoir 36.77
  • bits
    6 x nickel " thread to "ID hose connectors 2.35ea
    Jubilee clips 12-20mm 0.63
    Danger Den "ID tubing (10') 21.50
    3 x 120mm Revoltec UV red fans 26.43
    1 x 92mm Revoltec UV red fan 6.40
    2 x 1-litre Innovatek Protect IP fluid 33.40
    2 x Zalman ZM-2HC2 heatpipe harddisk coolers 47.92


#34
WITHTEETH

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I was going to get the 680i striker extreme by asus, but HARDOCP gave it a terrible review. Chipset runs hot, cpus run 5-10F higher, cant overclock past 400FSB

What is the stock setting FSB for this striker? And what does 400FSB equal in mhz for the cpu, anyone know?

Seems like a revision is in order, it may be due to the bios, but if its a hardware problem then I'm going to get some other chipset, any good 975X, whats the top of the line anyone know, im looking for overclockability, stability.

#35
mkreku

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I'm using a motherboard based of the 975X. It's an Abit AW9D-MAX and it's easily the best motherboard I've ever owned. It was designed from the ground up for overclocking, and uses solid state capacitors and other high level stuff. I've been playing around with it since I got it and overclocking is extremely easy on it. I've had it up to 3.4 GHz stable on the stock air cooler! I've been up to 3.6 GHz but I didn't dare to keep it there until I've gotten hold of a more efficient cooler.

I think I'm in love with my motherboard :o

A bit pricey though.

#36
metadigital

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I think that was the top-of-the-line mobo before the Asus took the crown (in Custom PC's view); certainly not a bad mobo at all. :o

I think the better availabilty of PCI-e slots was a big factor, as well as the fact that the Asus P5B Deluxe WiFi-AP allowed Core 2 Duo E6700 from 266MHz to 360MHz (the highest the magazine team had seen).

#37
WITHTEETH

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I'm using a motherboard based of the 975X. It's an Abit AW9D-MAX and it's easily the best motherboard I've ever owned. It was designed from the ground up for overclocking, and uses solid state capacitors and other high level stuff. I've been playing around with it since I got it and overclocking is extremely easy on it. I've had it up to 3.4 GHz stable on the stock air cooler! I've been up to 3.6 GHz but  I didn't dare to keep it there until I've gotten hold of a more efficient cooler.

I think I'm in love with my motherboard :)

A bit pricey though.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I've noticed a lot of people are getting this board. I'll have to check this and the one meta mentioned. I just bought a wifi card though so if i were to get the wifi mobo id feel i wasted 50 bucks... then again the mobo i was about to get cost 320! :)

mkreku, will it support core 2 quad? how do you feel about the expansion slot options?

edit: i noticed the abit has solid state capacitors, reset button, and overclocks pretty well. My only question is, are these 975x mobos able to have the higher FSB of 1333 when the time comes? Is it just an update they would give to the bios? :o

EDIT: EDIT: Do you guys think that all this passive cooling stuff is a waste of money when they could add a fan and call it good. You need a fan anyway if you are going to use water blocks to get some kind of air flow anyway right? Not that im using water.

Edited by WITHTEETH, 09 December 2006 - 10:31 AM.


#38
Bokishi

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I think I'll opt for the Cooler Master Real Power Pro 850w and its six 12v Rails ;)

#39
metadigital

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Did I mention that, if you can't be bothered to build that PC yourself, Vadim will build it for you, for 2,782. (And you can ask them for a GPU upgrade, too.)

#40
Bokishi

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I can't descrive any reason why they would charge that much.




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