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Coronavirus Goes Fourth


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16 minutes ago, Zoraptor said:

I think they did that literally ten minutes after I posted, so it was probably my fault.

Not likely to be a badly manufactured batch, the relevant European regulations are extremely strict. If it's a 'bad batch' improper post production storage, improper dosing/ training, or- at a pinch- deliberate tampering would be far more likely causes. They're all far less likely than other explanations though.

The irony though 😂

 

Civilization, in fact, grows more and more maudlin and hysterical; especially under democracy it tends to degenerate into a mere combat of crazes; the whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, most of them imaginary. - H.L. Mencken

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14 hours ago, BruceVC said:

Dark arent you concerned with this  " Vaccine hesitancy " that we see throughout the world ? Its quite big in the USA amongst minorities and the Trump support base. On CNN they were saying more than 40 % of Republican men wont take the vaccine 

Take a look at this graph in the link below to see who in the USA are worst offenders around this 

https://www.mediaite.com/politics/almost-half-of-republican-men-say-they-wont-get-the-coronavirus-vaccine/

I'm always hesitant with something in its first itteration, and I can't blame people, to be somewhat hesitant until they see results on real population. 

I said once before, that I do believe the vaccinations are the solution, just it was too early to rely on it and trumpet around the success. Usually complex problems require discipline and time, both of which are lacking in the modern populace. 

We see various mutantions emerging, we still do not know the exact source / origin and while tests show various positive outcomes, they are just tests in a control group, which might not be fully representative. 

 

There is also too much of politics around distribution of various vaccines, and profit margin protection, to treat this roll out more seriously. 

 

All this points me to a direction, wait, isolate, observe and see for a next gen roll out. 

 

 

Edited by Darkpriest
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9 hours ago, Darkpriest said:

Based on the rushed testing protocol they used, as well as being from a highly questionable information source (Putin's Russia), that would be the vaccine I would have the greatest hesitancy in using.

"It has just been discovered that research causes cancer in rats."

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9 hours ago, Darkpriest said:

It was inevitable, good opportunity to develop some soft power so some will want to block that.  That said, don't think the Sputnik vaccine is dodgy.   Hopefully the US does something with the AZ doses it's sitting on for now, Canada and Mexico can use those - https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/11/us/politics/coronavirus-astrazeneca-united-states.html

Edited by Malcador

Why has elegance found so little following? Elegance has the disadvantage that hard work is needed to achieve it and a good education to appreciate it. - Edsger Wybe Dijkstra

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The trials for Sputnik are as good as any approved vaccine except, ironically, the AZ one and have been peer reviewed by western academics plus published in The Lancet. Ironically ironic, a lot of the criticism of AZ comes from them being far more detailed with their information than anyone else including Pfizer, Moderna and J&J; and people mining that data for criticisms (eg the whole "can't use on over 65s" is not because it didn't work, but because not enough in the control got covid for that demographic. Couldn't tell if that were the case with others though, as the stats aren't detailed enough). At this point criticism of Sputnik is 100% FUD, unless you're criticising the others for the same things, and it has the best balance of efficacy and cost of any of them- and loses out marginally only to the J&J one when it comes to practicality due to that one requiring a single dose.

Edited by Zoraptor
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2 hours ago, Zoraptor said:

At this point criticism of Sputnik is 100% FUD, ...

Pretty much the same place that vaccine hesitancy is coming from, I'd say.

"It has just been discovered that research causes cancer in rats."

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It seems that EMA isn't able to say that AZ vaccine doesn't cause dangerous blood clots in really rare (less than 20 cases among 20 million vaccinated people) cases, but thinks that countries should continue to use it because they estimate that it benefits far exceeds any risk (such 2009 statement) and inform patients and doctors and nurses about the possibility such rare blood clots and monitor recipients if they are deemed to be in a risk.

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me-waiting-for-my-turn-for-the-vaccine.j

The good news for me at least is that the state is lowering the eligibility age for vaccines at the end of the month, so I'll finally be able to join a queue. My old work buddies and I are hoping things will reach a point where we can get together for a gathering some time this summer. Keeping my fingers and toes crossed...

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"It has just been discovered that research causes cancer in rats."

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So, the EU had been threatening to block vaccine exports to the UK, including making (false) allegations that the UK has an export ban- in actuality they just got a guaranteed delivery contract instead of the EU stupidly going for a 'best effort' one because they thought they'd have domestic offerings. The response from Pfizer has been to point out that they receive critical ingredients from the UK, and any reciprocation of ban would see the EU with way less vaccine rather than more.

Pretty much sums up the overall competence of the EU's response- make an empty threat backed up with outright lies, when the vaccine you're relying on requires ingredients from the country you're threatening. And they seemingly didn't have a clue that that's the case despite vaccines being perhaps the single most important acute need strategic resource on the planet at the moment.

The previous crop of EU appointees weren't exactly inspiring except the thoroughly competent Mogherini, but the current crop are making them look like Solon.

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is it so hard to wait a couple more months before abandoning social distancing and common sense pandemic practices? if we had collectively been more conscientious back in march o' last year, we wouldn't have anywhere near +550k deaths. a handful o' months o' rigorous social distancing, and then a few more o' less stringent but still advisable practices, would likely see an end o' the US problems, but we can't seem to stop punching our selves in the face.

HA! Good Fun!

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"If there be time to expose through discussion the falsehood and fallacies, to avert the evil by the processes of education, the remedy to be applied is more speech, not enforced silence."Justice Louis Brandeis, Concurring, Whitney v. California, 274 U.S. 357 (1927)

"Im indifferent to almost any murder as long as it doesn't affect me or mine."--Gfted1 (September 30, 2019)

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12 hours ago, Zoraptor said:

So, the EU had been threatening to block vaccine exports to the UK, including making (false) allegations that the UK has an export ban- in actuality they just got a guaranteed delivery contract instead of the EU stupidly going for a 'best effort' one because they thought they'd have domestic offerings. The response from Pfizer has been to point out that they receive critical ingredients from the UK, and any reciprocation of ban would see the EU with way less vaccine rather than more.

Pretty much sums up the overall competence of the EU's response- make an empty threat backed up with outright lies, when the vaccine you're relying on requires ingredients from the country you're threatening. And they seemingly didn't have a clue that that's the case despite vaccines being perhaps the single most important acute need strategic resource on the planet at the moment.

The previous crop of EU appointees weren't exactly inspiring except the thoroughly competent Mogherini, but the current crop are making them look like Solon.

I don't suppose you could get me a job as a yard jockey down there? I'm looking to get away from everything 😂

Civilization, in fact, grows more and more maudlin and hysterical; especially under democracy it tends to degenerate into a mere combat of crazes; the whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, most of them imaginary. - H.L. Mencken

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3 hours ago, Gromnir said:

is it so hard to wait a couple more months before abandoning social distancing and common sense pandemic practices? if we had collectively been more conscientious back in march o' last year, we wouldn't have anywhere near +550k deaths. a handful o' months o' rigorous social distancing, and then a few more o' less stringent but still advisable practices, would likely see an end o' the US problems, but we can't seem to stop punching our selves in the face.

HA! Good Fun!

Just like Brazil. People didn't respected lockdown last year and claimed it doesn't work. Now we are at the worst moment since it began.

Edited by InsaneCommander

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2 hours ago, Azdeus said:

I don't suppose you could get me a job as a yard jockey down there? I'm looking to get away from everything 😂

Even if it were a serious request I wouldn't even consider it momentarily. Covid is one thing, but anyone wanting to avoid that is infinitely better going to, and may Allah smite me for saying the word, Australia.

I couldn't in good conscience advise anyone to move to NZ until they fix the housing market appreciating at 30%+ p/a (who would a thunk no capital gains tax and zero interest rates would result in that? Only those with a functioning brain and IQ above ambient temperature, which apparently describes no one at Treasury or in Government here) and at 20x the average annual wage, before tax. Rents up 30%, wages up 1%, and 'experts' are baffled why the economy is in recession despite the housing bubble. Easy answer, 50% of the population has had their disposable income reduced by having to pay rent increases which are then used to repay the banks rather than being spent in actual businesses. So stimulus, much economic activity etc etc. Oh well, you know what they say; there is only one type of person who believes in infinite growth in a finite system: economists, politicians, and idiots and they'll ride the bubble all the way down to oblivion. 

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I've been using the pandemic as an easy way out of social gatherings for a year now.

I need to start a list of excuses so I can start rehearsing them, because I'm pretty certain I've forgotten how to improvise excuses on the spot ._.

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Civilization, in fact, grows more and more maudlin and hysterical; especially under democracy it tends to degenerate into a mere combat of crazes; the whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, most of them imaginary. - H.L. Mencken

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On 3/20/2021 at 10:16 PM, Zoraptor said:

Even if it were a serious request I wouldn't even consider it momentarily. Covid is one thing, but anyone wanting to avoid that is infinitely better going to, and may Allah smite me for saying the word, Australia.

I couldn't in good conscience advise anyone to move to NZ until they fix the housing market appreciating at 30%+ p/a (who would a thunk no capital gains tax and zero interest rates would result in that? Only those with a functioning brain and IQ above ambient temperature, which apparently describes no one at Treasury or in Government here) and at 20x the average annual wage, before tax. Rents up 30%, wages up 1%, and 'experts' are baffled why the economy is in recession despite the housing bubble. Easy answer, 50% of the population has had their disposable income reduced by having to pay rent increases which are then used to repay the banks rather than being spent in actual businesses. So stimulus, much economic activity etc etc. Oh well, you know what they say; there is only one type of person who believes in infinite growth in a finite system: economists, politicians, and idiots and they'll ride the bubble all the way down to oblivion. 

As far as I know, that discrepancy between the housing prices' growth and real wage growth is the same across the vast majority of the developed world, especially in larger cities. I'd be surprised if the situation isn't by and large the same in Australia. It sure is throughout western Europe, at least. While the specifics of the phenomenon vary by region(here in Sweden dubious lending practices have had an effect, back in Portugal foreign speculators and very low wages did not help) the main cause for the phenomenon appears to be ever widening income inequality and eternally low interest rates.

Just to say housing is a problem everywhere, so it wouldn't be a reason not to move to NZ.

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My sister lives in Australia, she'd literally have to sell both her houses there to buy a smaller one here, and take a wage cut of 20% too.

Realistically the only way- literally- to buy a house is if you already own one and can borrow against that or at very very least aren't paying rent, hence the biggest buyer sector at the moment is- literally- people who already own 6+ houses and can leverage those properties for borrowing. If you're trying to buy a house you're spending ~25k on rent if you're lucky, need to save ~20k to keep up with the deposit's appreciation alone, and that on a median wage of 70k, before tax. For the typical person that leaves 5k to spend on everything else. Then they wonder why the economy is tanking despite all the money printing and low interest rates.

Actually, there was some progress today. If you were a property investor you could (lol) write off borrowing costs including interest against tax- which of course a normal mortgagee could not. That has been removed, but up until literally today if you were a property investor you typically paid, literally, no tax on either those 30% p/a capital gains nor on the rent you charged the serfs renting your land.

Oh yeah, coincidentally, the average number of properties owned by the average New Zealand MP is 3+ even without counting those hidden away in trusts etc- and there is a grand total of one MP in parliament who doesn't own a house.

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12 hours ago, Gfted1 said:

^Well youre never going to meet a nice lumberlass and have giant kids that way. :p 

Tinder.

Why has elegance found so little following? Elegance has the disadvantage that hard work is needed to achieve it and a good education to appreciate it. - Edsger Wybe Dijkstra

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14 minutes ago, Gfted1 said:

Speaking of which, and I understand that Im old and have been married for 1000 years, but DAMN, people have no shame on that app. :lol:

Hey now, why were you on Tinder ? :p

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Why has elegance found so little following? Elegance has the disadvantage that hard work is needed to achieve it and a good education to appreciate it. - Edsger Wybe Dijkstra

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4 hours ago, Pidesco said:

As far as I know, that discrepancy between the housing prices' growth and real wage growth is the same across the vast majority of the developed world, especially in larger cities. I'd be surprised if the situation isn't by and large the same in Australia. It sure is throughout western Europe, at least. While the specifics of the phenomenon vary by region(here in Sweden dubious lending practices have had an effect, back in Portugal foreign speculators and very low wages did not help) the main cause for the phenomenon appears to be ever widening income inequality and eternally low interest rates.

Just to say housing is a problem everywhere, so it wouldn't be a reason not to move to NZ.

It started happening 2-3 years ago in eastern Europe too, or at least here in Serbia. I heard a story/theory that it's not people who are buying up the market, but companies. They drive up the demand and prices and keep buying at a loss, so that when there is virtually no free real estate in area anymore they start renting it out at exorbitant prices. It kind of makes sense consider how empty most new buildings, that sold out, are. Then again could be rich people investing (money laundering) in real estate.

Edited by Sarex
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