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paz12

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Posts posted by paz12

  1. After patch: Same bug. I delivered the package, talked to Verzano, decided to defend him. Fought the killer commando. Verzano survived. Quest bugged: Verzano now tells me to deliver the package (which I already did). Seems like he HAS to die no matter what.

     

    Edit: The fight is also bugged in many ways: At the start of the fight I retreated to another room. I could hear the fighting in the other room. When I entered that room again to check whether or not Verzano had died, I realized that he was regenerating health ... The Doemonels were unable to kill him. (I didn't do anything. I basically just ran away, trying to wait for Verzano to die.)

     

    Edit2: I let Verzano die during the fight, killed the Doemenels, but Pellagina was nowhere to be found. Cannot recruit her.

    So tried again: I reloaded the autosave BEFORE ALL DIALOGS, just when entering the building after delivering the package. Then I played the whole scene again, chosing exactly the same dialog options. The fight started, I won, Verzano survived. Then I waited for about 10 seconds.  *pling*  Quest updated.

     

    There might be two possible causes for this bug:

    1) Clicking on Verzano immediately after the fight, ie. before the quest updates.

    2) Loading a manual save "inbetween".

     

    When I encountered the bug, I did both. I clicked on Verzano immediately after the fight, and I loaded a save from the start of the fight (a save from after the dialog, when the red circles appear at start of combat).

  2. 3.  Eothas, the god of forgiveness and redemption (and thus most directly opposed to Woedica) gets wind of this and can't figure out a way to counteract Thaos except by creating his own avatar.

    4.  Eothas selects Waidwen to be his avatar, possibly because conditions in Raedceras have driven enough people to the worship of Eothas that the god has sufficient power there to accomplish this.

     

    I was under the impression that Thaos was directly responsible for Waidwen's behaviour. What if Waidwen was possessed by Thaos? This makes a lot of sense, because Thaos, as he brags in the end, has a habit of throwing entire nations into turmoil.

  3. I don't think I've seen something like this in a game for a while: The story has two layers:

     

    Surface world: Raedric, Defiance bay, the politics of a country and its recent history

    2nd layer: The powers behind this country's fate.

     

    PoE manages to tell the story of a country in turmoil. The strong point of the story becomes obvious in Defiance Bay:

     

    There are three factions there:

    1) Animancers

    2) Knights

    3) The Dozens

     

    In my playthrough, I ended (killed) the Knights for their plans to construct soul powered golems. I also killed the Dozens because they were involved in the slaughtering of innocent people after the war with Waidwin (Eothas). I also made animancy take the blame for the Hollowborn situation. Because they came across as dangerous and utterly incompetent on top of that.

     

    Why did I choose to oppose these groups? Because they did not have a clue. They were fighting each other. And they did not seem to be able to solve the crisis.

     

    Maybe I am wrong, but the story doesn't seem to present any reasons why you should help any of those camps. They seemed absolutely unfit to solve the crisis.

     

    As a watcher, I wasn't interested in using souls or their power. I wasn't interested in activating ancient machines, continuing any crusades, or strengthening the army. I was only interested in restoring the usual order of things. Which (during my playthrough) lead to a situation where I felt like leaving the city ASAP, because it seemed to be filled with lunatics.

     

    Of course they did not really behave like lunatics. They were just completely ignorant...

     

    PoE creates in interesting gap between the real world with its politics and factions, and the layer underneath it. The country is built on the ruins of an ancient civilisation, but the current inhabitants of

    that country have a very limited knowledge of the gods and powers that control their fate. They are just the surface layer, unable to touch or even see the powers that are controlling their fate.

     

    The real meat of the story, and the real rulers of their world, are underneath: Leaden Key, Adra Stones, and the Gods and devices of an ancient civilization. Hopefully the story will be continued. It was fun to save the world without the world knowing it.

    • Like 1
  4. Because something that is not relevant needs to be ignored. Because changing the irrelevant makes it relevant.

     

    Taking offense in that poem serves only one purpose: Generating clicks (attention) for people who are unable to generate attention by doing anything relevant. Ignoring them is the right thing. Force them to do/say/be something relevant.

  5.  

     

     

    Is it actually possible to escape combat at all once it's initiated?

     

     

    Yes, you use a disable or interrupt (or an escape spell, clone potion, etc).  There are ways to leave a battle, no need for easy mode to hold our hands.

     

     

    False. Once aggroed, it's you or the bear. No escape. No indication to the player that you need to level up a bit before fighting it, yet there is a quest telling you to go in the cave. Game tells me to do something then punishes me for doing it.

     

    If the game tells you to jump from a bridge, are you going to do it?

     

    Feedback like this shows that most games have degenerated into something that comes with its own walkthrough built-in.

  6.  

     

     

    (...)

    I get your point. Although in my opinion not having the level information does actually add something to my playing experience.

     

    What does it add? It keeps me in the game world. When the game starts, I don't know anything about the land or its creatures. In the first couple of minutes I learn about spiders, then wolves. There's a bandit camp nearby. There's a bear cave. This first map exemplifies what I like about this game. Spiders can be beaten easily. Bandits are tricky. Bear is impossible at the start. All on the same map. Which is the only map that can be reached. When I died it wasn't because I was on the "wrong" map. It was because I was a level 1 adventurer who was stupid and a noob and didn't have a clue.

     

    What did I learn from this map? I learned that the world is dangerous. I learned this by dying in-game, not by looking at a number. After the first map I did accept the possibility to encounter something that is actually stronger than my party. This created suspense.

     

    What does this lead to? In my case, I read the monster descriptions in the 'pedia. I also did not dare to engage some scary looking creature, because I was semi-sure I'd get my ass kicked. When I fought that creature later, it was laughably weak.

     

    I also engaged a group of guys that I took for some generic, weak ass bandits. Turned out they were not and I burned through all my spells in one unexpected show of power.

     

    Suprises, suspense, triumph and fear would not have been possible if there was a level number. I'd know beforehand whether or not I am supposed to win this fight. On my 2nd playthrough I will know that spiders are weak to crushing damage and fire. I'll know that this group is dangerous and that group is not. I can focus on efficiency as opposed to exploration.

     

    To put it short: Having numbers takes away exploration and adventure. I like this on my first playthrough.

     

     

    Your logic is very flawed. The post you are arguing against describes exactly what you claim to want. I'm very confused about your position on this topic. Providing information about the difficulty of a mob is in-game information that your characters would get from evaluating a potential enemy. That is in-game information. Having to fight something, find out it kills you, and then reload is NOT keeping things "in the game world".

     

     

     

    What did I learn from this map? I learned that the world is dangerous.

    Incorrect. You, as a player, may have learned this, but your character certainly did not. You have to reload to a time prior to when your character found this information out (i.e. before the fight). This is NOT keeping things "in the game world" as you claim to like. This is exactly the opposite of that.

     

    Having said that, it would be easy enough to implement the feature as optional, so why not suggest that instead of all the people saying "omg no I don't want this"?

     

    It's the difference between PnP roleplaying and CRPG. You don't reload anything in PnP. You either play like a cowardly chicken, or you will simply die and roll a new character, if you did not make sure to consider all availble options before fighting this or that monster.

     

    In a PnP game, I would never fight anyone on the first map. It's the wilderness. I am alone. I am on my way to the next city. Why would I want to fight random bandits 3 or 4 vs 1? But here I can reload, so I might as well try my luck. (Which is why I said that I was dying like a stupid, lvl 1 adventurer nub. It's a really stupid idea to consider fighting anything on that map.)

     

    If you take a CRPG seriously, that means if you consider it to be a role playing game, you'd have to adjust the playstyle and be very, very cautious. Giving away the level (or HP) of the monsters is information that is kept away from the players in role playing games. The GM won't tell you: you are facing a lvl 5 troll with 5d6 HP. He'll tell you: You are facing a troll. It's everybody's guess how strong that thing actually is in comparison to your party.

     

    You are right in saying that more information is needed about the monsters though. Because during the 1st playthrough I didn't have any idea how strong a shadow of phantom might be, and there was nothing that could tell me. No books, no characters, no nothing.

     

    However: If you take your time and play PoE on normal difficulty with expert mode "on", you will get something that simply isn't offered by games that give away level information (or colour coded mob names). Adventure. Because then you will try to avoid fights at all costs, meaning you will sneak through the wilderness, beelining towards the next quest objective, without trying to farm XP from monsters that you know to be weaker than your party.

     

    I am pretty sure PoE can be played without reloading if approached in a role playing way. That means: Sneak to Gilded Vale. Talk to everyone. Pick up 2 companions. Sneak south. Pick up 3rd companion. Sneak East, pick up 4th companion. Return to map north of Gilded Vale. Kill four bandits and a bear. You don't need level information or reloading to accomplish this.

     

    This playstyle actually works in PoE. Which is probably one of the game's greatest achievement.

     

    Apart from that: Role playing games work best, when the party knows that they are seriously underleveled. Because that's where exploring the game world starts, as opposed to going on a killing spree.

     

    But I get your point. Having level information has it's advantages. It's helpful information. But it has its dangers. And those outweigh the benefits, in my opinion.

  7. There is, but you have to get all three groups angry at you.  I wasn't able to determine how to get someone angry at you from the code.

    In my playthrough, I killed all three groups. I didn't want to help any of those crooks. Lady Webb congratulated me on that and said something about a "rare show of incompetence", but sent me to attend the hearing nevertheless. Killing all three groups + Lady Webb leads to madness and game over btw, which is great.

  8. IMO there are two things missing from the autopause settings menu.

     

    1) Pause when action completed (character has no orders)

    2) Pause when action cancelled/interrupted (character has no orders)

     

    It can be very hard to figure out how long it will take to simply drink a potion. It can also be very hard to figure out how long it will take to cast this spell / activate that ability.

     

    I think it would be a good idea to add before mentioned 2 options to the game. Anyone feeling the same?

     

     

  9. Dieses _x000D_

    Findet man immer wieder. Ich frage mich ob das irgendein Marker für die Übersetzer war, der vergessen wurde(samt allen Korrekturen)

     

     

    Hm, nun ist es richtig. Vorhin war's noch bei mir falsch? Hatte mir diesen Commit angesehen: https://github.com/phob/pillarsofeternity-german-patch/commit/2cf0ae1b2dc9c27736a8fc7d623c2d5243d62c23

    Zwei commits weiter ist es bereits korrigiert :)

     

     

    da ich leider kein plan hab wo man das in den dateien findet sag ich mal ein paar auffällige sachen es gibt scheinbar einen Char der mit Tab gedrückt  oder mousover als Schlüssel angezeigt wird xD

     

     

    Dann wurde das Pet  Black Hound  wohl nicht übersetzt ^^   an einer stelle wurde Rats nicht als Ratten übersetzt 

     

    Eigentlich sind die sachen die ich gepostet habe keine wirklchen spoiler.  

     

    Sind  noch mehr sachen aber das hier zu beschreiben ist unmöglich ^^

     

    Schlüssel habe ich auch gesehen. Ich denke aber das ist sein Name und beabsichtigt.

     

    Black Hound finde ich in der deutschen Übersetzung gar nicht.

    Das _x000D_ ist ein Fehler, den Excel beim Importieren von Texten mit Zeilenumbruch produziert, wenn man keine Ahnung hat und/oder nicht aufpasst.

  10.  

    Once upon a time, I did write strategy guides.  I'm also a very, very long time CRPG gamer (you named it, I've prolly played it...including text based games).

     

    There is simply no good reason not to give players an indication of mob strength via an obvious mechanic.  As I've said previously, levels are a completely arbitrary contrivance designed to simply bookkeeping in character/mob growth.  Why is a bear level 5?  Because some dev said so.  That's it.  No other reason.

     

    Well, you can't know that some dev assigned bear = level 5 which means you can't make a rational decision whether to fight it or not.  Unless....

     

    You buy some strategy guide that has an actually useful bestiary that tells you the mob levels before you guess, or (and this is why strategy guide writer is a former occupation rather than current) you look it up on the net.  This adds nothing worthwhile to the gaming experience.  And when you get to mobs unique the PoE gameworld, you're truly just guess or looking up stuff external to the game.  There is nothing fun about randomly guessing whether a fight is winnable.

     

    The way it is now:

    I look at a wuzzatthing.  I decide to attack because it's standing right next to a chest, and therefore, you can't sneak past it.  First tho, I save the game.  It roflstomps my entire party.  I reload the game.  Where is the fun in that?

     

    The way things should be:

    I look at a wuzzatthing and see that it's five levels higher than me.  I make a tactical withdrawal and a note to come back when I've drank a lot more milk to grow big and strong with healthy muscles and bones.

     

    Now, maybe if it'd been closer in level I might have tried it because I'd made a lot of extra cash and had some sweet gear and a well-built (ie. no official companions) party that worked like a well oiled machine.  But the important part is that I make a decision based on information I have rather than make a guess and use save-load to mitigate the potential loss from a bad guess.

     

    I get your point. Although in my opinion not having the level information does actually add something to my playing experience.

     

    What does it add? It keeps me in the game world. When the game starts, I don't know anything about the land or its creatures. In the first couple of minutes I learn about spiders, then wolves. There's a bandit camp nearby. There's a bear cave. This first map exemplifies what I like about this game. Spiders can be beaten easily. Bandits are tricky. Bear is impossible at the start. All on the same map. Which is the only map that can be reached. When I died it wasn't because I was on the "wrong" map. It was because I was a level 1 adventurer who was stupid and a noob and didn't have a clue.

     

    What did I learn from this map? I learned that the world is dangerous. I learned this by dying in-game, not by looking at a number. After the first map I did accept the possibility to encounter something that is actually stronger than my party. This created suspense.

     

    What does this lead to? In my case, I read the monster descriptions in the 'pedia. I also did not dare to engage some scary looking creature, because I was semi-sure I'd get my ass kicked. When I fought that creature later, it was laughably weak.

     

    I also engaged a group of guys that I took for some generic, weak ass bandits. Turned out they were not and I burned through all my spells in one unexpected show of power.

     

    Suprises, suspense, triumph and fear would not have been possible if there was a level number. I'd know beforehand whether or not I am supposed to win this fight. On my 2nd playthrough I will know that spiders are weak to crushing damage and fire. I'll know that this group is dangerous and that group is not. I can focus on efficiency as opposed to exploration.

     

    To put it short: Having numbers takes away exploration and adventure. I like this on my first playthrough.

    • Like 5
  11. When did the term "RPG", as in "Roleplaying Game", change it's meaning to "Single Player World Of Warcraft"? You don't need to have a bull**** crafting system where you create minor health potions you never use, nor do you need to swap from your cow leather armor to space cow leather armor every 5 minutes for incremental upgrades. You don't need to go on search for le epic loot and kill a big spider for a sword of cutting +1 that magically cuts through flesh somehow better than a regular ass sword.

     

    Simple version: Why do people whine for these things and associate them with the term "RPG"

    It's called evolution:

     

    amoeba

    enhanced amoeba

    very much so enhanced amoeba

    This all leads to the pinnacle of creation: mankind

     

    ultima I-V

    Diablo 1-3

    WoW

    This all leads to the pinnacle of creation: cow clicker

     

    (At least from the PR&investment department's point of view)

  12.  

     

    if you find it too easy, try turning expert mode on

    Expert mode doesn't really make combat harder. Maiming doesn't matter if you don't die in the first place, AoE highlights and defense tooltips are a memory, not tactical challenge, and I'm not sure about combat tooltips, but I assume they aren't terribly useful for people who know what they're doing.

     

     

    I can assure you that aiming 120 degree cones or some AoE spells can be difficult if you have no range highlights, you usually end up with selection of Foe only or friendly only AoEs and single target spells, because aside of the first opening "round" it is hard to aim, unless you are door blocking

     

    This. I am playing on normal diff. + expert. No beta experience with the game. At the start, I had some (=huge) difficulties during the first couple of hours because I had to learn AoE ranges by roasting my frontline :D When I finally found Eder + hired another PC, it became a lot easier. I was considering switching expert mode off, but then again, it's fun if you don't really know what your casters are doing. Also: dialog options.

  13.  

    It's not that hard: +20 Verteidigung bei Niederschlag (=when a knock-down occurs, in German).

     

    Sorry man, but this would translate to 

    +20 Defence during Precipitation

     

    And "Niederschlag" (Precipitation) as a weather condition having effect on defence would be a weird translation in this context. (Maybe a better word would be "Bewusstlosigkeit"/unconsciousness/blackout)

     

    Looks like it is really difficult to get translations right :D

     

    Haha, I'm sorry, but "Niederschlag" is a perfectly normal term frequently used in boxing: "Stieglitz: Niederschlag kurz vor Ende" (http://www.ran.de/boxen/video/stieglitz-niederschlag-kurz-vor-ende-clip). "Niedergeschlagenheit" however, when used in boxing, is a feeling of disappointment since the fight was lost and all the pain has been in vain :D

  14. The characters in the keep definitely do gain XP - I did a test myself today.(I put my created mage in with 3017 XP, went and cleared the wilderness area before entering Defiant City and at the inn, dragged her out and she'd gained about 200-300ish XP. I didn't, like an idiot, check how much XP the rest of the activfe party had gained. It does appear to be at a fairly reduced rate, though, so I've no idea how much slower it is.

    I think they get around 90%. I was running around with a 2 man party, turning in quests for a while. When I came back, my main guy had gotten 1100 while the 3 sleepers in the inn got 900-something each. Not sure whether or not XP are reduced by the number of NPCs. My 2nd custom character doesn't level like the rest of them (I think).

  15. RPGs fangen eigentlich immer gut an. Doch für einen wie mich, der eigentlich keine PC-Spiele mehr kaufen wollte, weil sie einfach keinerlei Langzeitmotivation bieten oder generell viel zu schwer sind, ist Pillars of Eternity selbst auf leicht noch viel zu schwer.

     

    Gute Wertungen hin oder her, heutzutage wird alles sowieso in vielerlei Hinsicht zu hoch bewertet.

    Bin eigentlich auch ein Mensch, der sich auch ohne PC-Spiele wohlfühlt.

    Ich sagte auch mal, man verblödet dabei, geht ein oder wird ein Fettsack, oder man verliert den Bezug zur Realität.

     

    Pillars of Eternity ist das einzige Spiel, das ich besitze. Seit Jahren habe ich nichts mehr gespielt, weil mir das alles viel zu schwer ist und auch keinerlei Langzeitmotivation bietet.

     

    Bei Pillars of Eternity möchte ich aber dran bleiben, weil mir der Anfang einfach zu gut gefallen hat.

    Nun laufe ich zu dritt rum und habe auch einen angeheuert, aber egal in welches Gebiet ich gehe: Dort lauern immer Gegner, die mich sofort platt machen.

     

    Wie soll ich das bloß bewältigen?

     

    Benötige mal paar Einsteigertipps.

     

    Gruß

     

    Einsteigertipps: Lauf mal durch das Dorf am Anfang und verschaff dir einen Überblick, wer dort alles Hilfe benötigt. Dass man zwischendurch ab und zu stirbt, ist normal, dafür gibt es die Schnellspeicherfunktion. Schau in den Optionen nach, welche Taste "Schnellspeichern" ist.

     

    Kampf: Bei den ersten Kämpfen kann es helfen, einem deiner drei Figuren einen Bogen zu geben. Mit dem schleichst du vor, bis du einen Feind siehst und schießt dann auf den. Dann rennst du weg und zwar in Richtung deiner beiden Kollegen, die irgendwo warten. Wenn du es richtig machst (oder Glück hast), kommt dann nur eines der Viecher, die dich plattmachen wollen, und du kämpft drei gegen eins.

     

    Auch hilfreich: Automatische Pause einstellen: Pause bei "Gegner gesichtet" und Pause bei "Kampfbeginn". Außerdem: Bevor du jemandem irgendeinen Befehl gibst, auch immer erstmal das Spiel pausieren (mit der Leertaste). So kannst du besser planen, wer was machen soll und behältst den Überblick.

    Ganz wichtig: Wenn sich Leute im Nahkampf befinden, dann müssen die an Ort und Stelle bleiben und dürfen sich nicht bewegen, weil der Gegner sonst zusätzliche Angriffe auf deinen (scheinbar "fliehenden") Charakter bekommt. Ich bin am Anfang immer um die Gegner rumgelaufen, weil ich von hinten angreifen wollte, aber das funktioniert nicht, wenn sie sich erst einmal im Nahkampf befinden. Auf jeden Fall sinnvoll ist es aber, den Gegner in die Zange zu nehmen. Dann bekommt man einen Angriffsbonus.

     

    Am Anfang geht's, glaube ich, vom Dorf aus zuerst nach Norden (also zurück) und dann nach Osten und nach Süden. Wenn du zu dritt zu schwach bist, dann kannst du auch noch in die Kneipe im Dorf und dort am Tresen (wo du auch Essen kaufst) einen "Abenteurer anheuern", kostet ca. 150-300 Gold, glaube ich. Mit dem wärt ihr dann schon zu viert. Oder du heuerst zwei an.

     

    Viel Glück!

  16.  

     

    Everyone is used to WoW and vanity crap items and the next cool piece of gear.

    And, more relevantly, they've forgotten BG1 - an 80 hour game where you can count on 1 hand the number of magical weapons that offer anything other than a simple to-hit and damage bonus.

     

    Nothing other than Modern RPG conditioning/brain washing can explain why BG1 never got bashed for its "boring" loot itemization, while we sit here and watch PoE getting raked over the coals for it.

     

     

    Um.  I don't think you played the same BG1 the rest of us played.  Either that (and more likely), it's a bit easy to forget what a game released last century (seriously) was really like.

     

    But as I said before, while I don't necessarily agree with the OP, I do think Josh failed in his goal to make variety a viable option.  Regardless of what he may have intended with the design, padded armor still sucks.  Daggers vs stiletto is a no brainer in favor of stiletto.  And whatever cloak throws the most defensive buffs on you is the right choice regardless of class.

     

    The thing I remember about BG1's items is that I generated characters with the idea of using a specific item many hours later. I also remember that I rolled a rogue for the single reason of looting a chest in the area north of Jaheira's starting location, because this chest had some quality items that I wanted to get ASAP. On top of the scarce loot this game offered, BG1 also had the iron crisis, remember? Normal weapons were constantly breaking in the middle of the fight. Haha, hilarious!

     

    BG1: +1/+2 generic trash. And some truly legendary gear, named after some legendary guy who did legendary stuff. No droptables in that game, for sure.

  17. I'd suggest you play more, listen to reviewers less. 

     

    Spear and mace are very different. They do different damage types which can be significant depending on enemies' damage reduction types. Spear has reach and can attack from behind another character for example which can be pretty useful. Bonus accuracy and DR bypass are very different too, accuracy means little vs. an opponent with high DR while the spear would be better vs. an opponent with lower DR but higher deflection. 

     

    As for loot, equipment has enchantments similar to DnD. So for example you had your generic +1/2/3 bonuses or life drain or + 1d6 of a certain type of damage or some kind of spell effect on strike, etc. PoE has pretty much all that stuff. For example, instead of +X enchantments it has weapon quality which increases accuracy and damage. You can also enchant stuff and make your own magic weapons/armor as well as just find or buy them.  

    After reading this, I seriously need to get back to my stronghold ASAP! I've been finding some equipment with spells recently, and I would love to create my own "Flail of Combusting Wounds", or something like that.

     

    Currently my party is using "named" items exclusively. These items are significantly better than my starting equipment. I also felt very happy when I had the money and gems to improve my "unique" items (=items that have names). In BG some of the best gear came very very late in the game. I'm sure this will be similar with PoE. About padded armor being viable. I'm not so sure about that. My life got a lot easier since I equipped 4 of my guys with the heaviest armor available.

  18. This is one thing I can really agree with. There are 2 things that make PotD not a viable play option for a first-time playthrough. One is that once combat begins, there is no escape. If you aggro the wrong thing, your game is over. The other is that there is no way to determine which red circle is capable of one-shotting you.

     

    I am absolutely loving this game, but I do wish there was a con system. Without it, you probably shouldn't try PotD until you after you are thoroughly familiar with the game.

    IMO it's hilarious to even consider choosing PotD for the 1st playthrough. PotD should be for people who WRITE the guides, not for those who need or read them.

     

    Myself, I'm a BG/IWD veteran, and I chose expert/normal diff. on my 1st playthrough. And I seriously regret picking expert/normal instead of non-expert/hard.

     

    About the level info, etc. I LOVE the feeling of not knowing whether I am too powerful or too weak (cause in non-scaling RPGs you will always be either of those). On some maps I was too powerful and too weak on the same map! That's great. Creates some suspense.

    • Like 5
  19. I am very dissappointed with the quality of the German texts in the game. I started to play the game in English and I liked the story. Later, I switched to German and I had BIG problems to understand what is actually going on story-wise. I had to read many, many sentences twice of even three times to figure out what was going on.

     

    It seems the translators did not know English very well, neither were they able to create normal German sentences.

     

    Reading the journal description is like reading the desperate tries of a 15-year old who is totally overwhelmed by the challenge that comes with an ever so slightly more complicated sentence structure. The translators seem unable to break down a sentence into two and will happily create monster sentences that do not make any sense whatsoever.

     

    Apart from that the localizing the names creates another ton of confusion, because the names of locations are hard to distinguish from normal nouns.

     

    New game terms are translated very strangely:

     

    A cipher has been translated into "Medium", which is a perfectly normal and established technical term for somebody who is talking to the spirits of the dead. This term is NOT interesting, or mysterious. As it turns out a cipher is NOT just a medium.

     

    Animancy (a word that is quite similar to 'necromancy') has been translated into "Beseelung", which is a) losing the necromancy/science component and b) misleading, because 'Beseelung' in German means "to add a soul into something", which is just one tiny aspect of animancy.

     

    Leaden Key: translated to the very awkward 'Bleierner Schlüssel'. Simply calling it 'Bleischlüssel' would have been much easier to handle grammar wise.

     

    +20 defense during knock-down: +20 Verteidigung (=defense) während (=during) Niedergeschlagenheit (=feeling gloomy)

    Again: This is a translator that is incompetent: If there is no noun or expression for "during knock-down" ways must be found to improvise. It's not that hard: +20 Verteidigung bei Niederschlag (=when a knock-down occurs, in German).

     

    To sum it up: The translation of PoE is a word for word translation. It keeps the sentence structure at all costs, resulting in a text that is little better than edited google translate.

    • Like 1
  20. Actually, the german translation is pretty good in the written dialogues. It's everything else that is poorly, poorly translated.

     

     

    Worst offenders: Item and talent descriptions, item names (sometimes, there's something totally unrelated displayed instead of the item name) and combat text.

     

    I don't know how it is in the french localization, but it seems that it has different issues.

     

     

    The problem with this is: I can live with some bad translated dialogues; but everything that is related to frequently used game mechanics should have proper translation. This is not the case.

    Actually, I don't think the German localization is "good" anywhere. Even the dialogs offer lots of badly written German, with an abundance of grammar, spelling and style problems. Actually the German text has the level of somebody with no writing experience whatsoever. It's the work of amateurs. Hopefully it was as cheap as it looks.

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