Jump to content

Guard Dog

Members
  • Content Count

    628
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    160

Posts posted by Guard Dog

  1. 29 minutes ago, Achilles said:

    Yup :(

    Again, I'm just trying to square this against other things I hear you say.

    Or to put it another way, I can tell that you care deeply about corruption in government. What I'm hearing is that, when framed as a values question, if put in a position where we had to weigh rooting out corruption against supporting individual freedoms, individual freedoms comes first. In which case, it would seem that we should just accept that a certain amount of corruption is inevitable. When framed as a legal question, we should just trust that norms will be respected and that "bright lines" will be identified when crossed. When framed as a logistics question, what "should be" is maybe less important that what can practically be accomplished. Interestingly, it seems to me that this last one should afford you some insight into the minds of those who consider third party votes as "wasted".

    I don’t see is how we have to choose between the two. That’s the kind of “transactional thinking” Gromnir was warning against. In most respects Donald Trump was a better candidate to protect individual liberty than Hillary Clinton ever could’ve been. I didn’t vote for Donald Trump. It’s quite possible he would even have been a better candidate for individual liberty than Joe Biden. I still didn’t vote for Donald Trump. It would be a cold day in hell before I supported a man like that. If a political figure is corrupt and I really don’t give a damn where he sits on the political spectrum. He’s not worthy of the office he sits in. If you were asking me if I would rather see an honest authoritarian or a corrupt libertarian my answer would be neither. I reject the notion that it’s a choice of two. There is always a third option even if it’s only “none of the above“. Like I said your vote is your name. No candidate is owed that just because they mostly agree with you or they presume you have to pick some lesser evil. You don’t.
     

    now the great legal barbarian of the west takes that a one step further than I do. Trump is a terrible president, a corrupt authoritarian and the Republicans supported him. Therefore the Republicans deserve to lose. Can’t fault his thinking on that. But I would rather see the Republicans retain control of some of the government so the Democrats do not have total power. I’m pulling very hard for one or both of the republican candidates in Georgia to win their respective races and deny the Democrats complete control of Washington. But for what it’s worth if everything were reversed and the Democrats were trying to prevent complete Republican control of Washington I would be pulling for the Democrats in that instance. Politically united government is a thing to be feared and avoided. Just my opinion. In the particular instance of the Georgia runoff I don’t know that any of the four candidates are corrupt or not. All of them have said and done some morally questionable things from what I’ve read. I don’t think any of those four are any dirtier than the rest of the rats in the sewer

  2. On 12/20/2020 at 1:49 PM, Achilles said:

    Actually I don't. You're arguing it as a legal question and I'm proposing that it's an ethics question.

    It's not uncommon for managers within an organization to be subject to "blackout" dates, during which they cannot make certain types of trades - usually their own company stock, but in some cases with stocks related to their industry. It's accepted as a normal part of the role and a safeguard against any claims of impropriety. Is there a good reason why this is wisdom in the business sector but not in congress?

    Lastly, I guess I'm just trying to square the "they're all corrupt" talk against the "it's only corruption if they cross this very specific line, otherwise they are private citizens and any move to curb that is government overreach" talk. Do you see how these might seem like contradictory viewpoints?

    P.S.

    Except Trump, right?

    Trump did not have control of his assets while in office. I’m not sure who did. The presidents finances are managed in a blind trust while they serve. When it comes to corruption in Congress there are many, many forms it can take. Insider trading is probably the least and easiest to detect. I’ll be honest I don’t really have a strong opinion on this one way or the other. But it seems like a pretty hard sell because you’re going to have to get the Congress critters to agree to do that to themselves.

  3. I live alone these days. But I always try to make Christmas something different, something special. Even if it’s just for the critters. My first wife and I made stockings for all of our puppies. I still have three of them and put them up with a little tree every year. Desiree and Tommy of course have been gone for several years. But I still put them up with Sunny’s. I put presents in hers. She will get some scrambled eggs and steak strips added to her breakfast Christmas morning. Me too LOL. I bought the chickens a big bag of Happy Hen dried mealworms. You should see how they go nuts for that! They may not know the difference from Christmas Day and any other but it makes me happy to see them happy.

    The one thing I miss both this year Thanksgiving and Christmas is dinner at the VFW. A lot of the guys came and brought their families and it was usually a big cheerful party. Obviously we didn’t do that this year. Maybe next.

    When my first divorce was done I had a really bad time dealing with it. I was extremely depressed, terribly lonely, and completely and totally broke financially speaking. I hate to admit it but there were times during those days I started to wonder if the World would not be better off if I were not in it. For me those feelings amplified between Thanksgiving and Christmas. But there are always good reasons to go on and every low is followed by a high later. You just have to focus on the positive things in your life. And there’s always something in everyone’s life that’s a positive.

    • Like 3
    • Thanks 2
  4. 18 minutes ago, Achilles said:

    1) Except Trump, right?

    2) Not sure you answered the question

    Which? if it was reasonable to keep people from profiting from their positions of influence? Well it’s already illegal to do that. It’s called insider trading and people do go to jail for that. Heck you can get dismissed from Congress for even the suspicion. The ethics committee takes that pretty seriously. Unless you’re a member of the majority party. Or the question was it OK for the government to make slavery illegal? If you ask me that should’ve been settled before the constitution was even ratified. The folks in 1788 did the country no favors by not eliminating slavery before the constitution was even ratified. I realize there was a chance they would lose Georgia and South Carolina over that. If that was the price it should have been paid. They could not have lasted on their own economically. A Civil War and generations of suffering might have been avoided.

    but on the other hand there are a lot of people living happy and productive lives in the United States today, particularly people of color, who would never have been born. So even in terrible things there’s usually an upside. 
     

    anyway back on the topic at hand. If you want to set up some kind of a blind trust for Congress members the way the president and vice president have that would be one way to go. But you cannot tell one American they may not do some legal activity another American can do. Surely you see the legal problem with that idea right?

  5. 12 hours ago, Achilles said:

    Is it reasonable to have a rule which states that people who are in a position to influence markets are not able to personally benefit from doing so? Especially if they voluntarily put themselves in that positions under the guise of serving others and not themselves?

    Once upon a time, it was legal to purchase another person with your own money. Was the government wrong to make that illegal?

    Not even the same thing is it? Stocks and securities are not living humans. When the president and vice president get elected to office all of their assets are placed in a blind trust and managed by someone else. I suppose you could try to do something like that for a congressman or senator. But passing a law for bidding them to manage their own assets without some alternative is a non starter. Besides some of these old birds spent 30 years in politics. Stock and securities are a vital part of retirement planning for pretty much everybody now.

     

    • Thanks 1
  6. Correct me if I'm wrong... isn't espionage an act of war? Doesn't anyone thing the President, either of them... should say something about this? I'm not suggesting we expel all ambassadors and go to DEFCON 2 but surely there is SOMETHING they should be doing? 

    • Thanks 1
  7. Why Are Americans So Distrustful of Each Other? - WSJ

    Hint: Politics. Political leaders (one in particular but no one has a monopoly on this) falsely convincing folks political opponents are literal enemies and all the societal institutions (sports, media, schools, churches, stores, etc) that we all rely on are actual combatants in a culture war being waged against one group or another. And based on some of the comments coming from incoming Biden Admin people Biden's call for unity runs only one way. So don't expect any improvements. 

  8. My favorite hypocrisy so far came from the mayor of either Austin or San Antonio, I forget which. After admonishing his citizens not to travel he takes a private jet to Cabo. In fact one story had him making the announcement from Cabo. Most of these guys I bet it really chaps their ass to have to apologize. Who were the stinky plebeians to question what they do?

  9. 1 hour ago, Gromnir said:

    hypocrite? no question 'bout it. however, the recall petition, even if all the signatures is gathered, is a longshot effort. 

    brianna kielar from cnn went down the list o' democrat hypocrites regarding covid-19 restrictions. not a short list and hardly comprehensive.

    however, am always amazed at how gd will complete blow basic facts for no good reason whatsoever. the french laundry cannot accommodate 600 people. 60? maybe. hyperbole is thy middle name. the gavin newsom dinner party were a collection o' 'bout a dozen people. still bad. still hypocritical. not need the exaggeration to make a point.

    aside, as we mentioned in another thread, the ca covid limits has been applied complete inequitable and with little consideration o' actual intercourse between counties. our neighbors recent went on a weekend trip to santa cruz in spite o' the new travel guidelines.... though admitted they would not have been able to do so this week as santa cruz predictable slipped into the highest tier o' threat level. idiots.

    napa, where is french laundry, didn't have an indoor dining restriction at the time o' gavin newsom's dinner. to his credit, not much credit, newsom did not plead some kinda technical adherence to guidelines in his apology. the ca governor deserved to be lambasted and criticized.

    the other day we were driving through wilton, ca to our local veterinarian and we saw a group o' folks pleading with motorists to stop and sign their gavin petition. the signature gathering effort were set-up in a parking lot adjacent to the local feed store. four or five clustered and maskless wingnuts sold trump/maga (and harley davidson) paraphernalia from same table they collected john han****s.  as you might imagine, we were not moved to sign.

    curious, the feed store carries mazuri (purina) bear diet in bulk. 

    HA! Good Fun!

    I got the number off the news broadcast on POTUS Channel 124 SiriusXM. It was during the Michael Smerconish show this morning. I like his show. If the facts are incorrect either I misunderstood or they were reported incorrect by CBS radio Or a little of both. I assure you it was not intentional nor hyperbole.

     

    Edit: It was over a dozen people from different households at the party with Newsom. Not 600. I either miss heard or misunderstood or ran two stories together in my head. Not intentional.

  10. The fine folks of California are halfway to recalling their governor. The petition for a recall election has passed 750,000 signatures. Newsom is one of the biggest corona lockdown hypocrites, but just one of many. While he shutting down and putting restaurants out of business in his own state telling his citizens they must stay home and wear masks he goes to a fancy birthday party of 600 people wearing no mask at a restaurant whose average meal costs more than the unemployment check of the people he’s put out of work. Hey one thing you have to love about California is they know how to dispose of troublesome governors.

  11. 9 minutes ago, Gfted1 said:

    How do you "cash out"? Can you just go to the bank and collect your $20k and transfer them the bitcoin? Or you can only virtually spend it at places that accept bitcoin?

    To buy and sell crypto you have to sign up to an exchange. There are several but I use Coinbase. You create a virtual “wallet“. And yes you could use it just like a currency if you were doing business with someplace that accepts bitcoin as payment. Or any other cryptocurrency. There are several. One even has the backing of the US treasury. But you can sell the asset back to the exchange like any other security 

    • Like 1
  12. 11 hours ago, Gromnir said:

    literal or politically?

    in the past we would have observed aoc popularity would need eventual be supported by actual achievements, but such isn't the case in 2020 american politics. today, messaging and branding is more important. blame on republicans. blame on moderate democrats. heck, blame on the lincoln project. tangible success is unimportant as long as her message resonates with her base and there is a them to blame for failures.

    sound familiar?

    polarization means aoc can be successful, and so too may marjorie taylor greene.

    brave new world.

    HA! Good Fun!

    US politics these days is a big shiny package with nothing in it. All butter no bread. I guess this was inevitable. 

×
×
  • Create New...