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The Weird, Random and Interesting Things That Fit Nowhere Else Thread


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#141
Gromnir

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Now if you watched Airwolf when it originally aired that would be something.


As you would admit you watched that.

*snort*

 

airwolf and blue thunder were competing tv shows both based on a 1983 movie 'bout a kinda covert police helicopter, blue thunder.  the blue thunder tv show, cast including bubba smith, **** butkus and dana carvey, were vast superior to airwolf.

 

...

 

actual, we can't say which show were better as we didn't actual watch much of either.  did see the original movie though. even so, a **** butkus, bubba smith, dana carvey dramatic tv show 'bout an urban stealth helicopter sounds like can't miss tv to 2017 Gromnir.

 

broadcast tos star trek were before our time, but we do recall, on our summer trips to chicago, watching the man from atlantis and the six million dollar man.  battlestar galactica were a bit later. were earliest broadcast scifi for us. from time we were in high school, tos were kinda a mainstay on weekday afternoon tv.  would need to rush home from football/track practice if we didn't wanna miss the start o' star trek. right before/at dinner time would be re-runs o' tos star trek.  musta seen every episode dozens o' times. 

 

didn't have a tv back home in pine ridge, but when we visited family in chicago, we would sit in front o' tv for hours at a time.  best tv stuff we recall were the ubiquitous saturday afternoon "horror" and kung fu movies.  there weren't much genuine horror movies on during saturday afternoons, but there always seemed to be the abbot and costello "meet" movies playing.  were also much danny kaye and similar vaudeville kinda guys. became a big danny kaye fan thanks to saturday afternoon tv.

 

even so, is possible a high point:

 

 

arguable better than the original fembots from bionic woman.

 

HA! Good Fun!

 

ps we also recall the cathy lee crosby wonder woman tv movie, but that is 'bout as far back as we can recall o' specific tv.


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#142
Gfted1

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I just watched that entire 7 minutes. And it was Andre the Giant in the suit! :lol: God, how I loved The Six Million Dollar Man growing up. I even had an "action figure" of him where you could peek through a little hole in the back of his head and see his "bionic vision". Other little panels popped of his arm and leg so you could see the mechanics in them. It was glorious. *wipes tear*

 

I also grew up watching most of the above mentioned shows when they originally aired...but not The Man From Atlantis, never heard of that, going to have to check it out. 



#143
Malcador

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Blue Thunder had a better theme.

#144
Amentep

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Man from Atlantis has Victor Buono in it as a reoccurring bad guy which is fun. Another decent short lived show was David McCallum's Invisible Man.

Airwolf was a Saturday show. I remember it as being dull but for certain age brackets it probably was a good sat show.

Now...who remembers the Phoenix with Judson Scott from 1982? Supertrain? The Fantastic Journey...?

The TV movie The Girl, The Goldwatch and Everything from 1980?

#145
Gromnir

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gonna admit we don't recall supertrain, but we do 'member phoenix.  am embarrassed to admit we liked phoenix. had some similarities to the incredible hulk with the protagonist seeming curse to travel on foot from town to town, solving the locals problems while dealing with a larger quest.  the greatest american hero were released kinda at same time as phoenix, but it lasted longer and were more campy.  watched fantastic voyage, but am pretty sure we had no idea what it were 'bout. time travel and the bermuda's triangle... or maybe not.  was it on at the same time as logan's run?  

 

HA! Good Fun!



#146
Amentep

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I think only three (?) Episodes of The Phoenix aired - we watched them all. I think it has a much worse reputation than it deserved.

Supertrain was a sci-fi love boat set on an atomic train. Really weird concept.

Fantastic Voyage faced the one-two punch of The Waltons and Welcome Back Kotter / Three's Company on the other networks. Mostly all I recall is the Bermuda Triangle and Roddy McDowall.

#147
Raithe

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So for the completely random and from nowhere, this mild amusement and quirk of an eyebrow:

 

Blockchain - Information about a Bitcoin transaction

 

That's somebody sending $160 million in Bitcoin over the internet. Transactions costs were 0.00016201 BTC ($0.7).


Edited by Raithe, 14 August 2017 - 04:02 AM.


#148
rjshae

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So for the completely random and from nowhere, this mild amusement and quirk of an eyebrow:

 

Blockchain - Information about a Bitcoin transaction

 

That's somebody sending $160 million in Bitcoin over the internet. Transactions costs were 0.00016201 BTC ($0.7).

 

People still use 'whois'?



#149
Katphood

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Alias has been a while now but... showing your age for knowing it? What? What am I then for having watched TNG when it originally aired? Ancient? :o

If you watched TOG when originally aired, I'd be impressed.

 

Nah, not that old, sorry. Well maybe in mind and spirit. ;)

 

Man, I used to watch this:

 

I must be a fossil.  :grin:


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#150
Malcador

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https://www.amazon.c...R2PLPYMZPGJ5JQ/

I think this guy is not a fan of Stephen Ambrose (man behind Band of Brothers)

#151
rjshae

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How to do 12 different accents:

 

 

Kind of fascinating, at least to me.


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#152
Raithe

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20768259_10102193011314864_7189431028325



#153
Raithe

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#154
Raithe

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http://vaudc.org/lee-defense.html

 


IN DEFENSE OF GENERAL LEE

By Edward C. Smith
Saturday, August 21, 1999
© Copyright 1999 The Washington Post Company

 

Let me begin on a personal note. I am a 56-year-old, third-generation, African American Washingtonian who is a graduate of the D.C. public schools and who happens also to be a great admirer of Robert E. Lee's.

 

Today, Lee, who surrendered his troops to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House 134 years ago, is under attack by people -- black and white -- who have incorrectly characterized him as a traitorous, slaveholding racist. He was recently besieged in Richmond by those opposed to having his portrait displayed prominently in a new park.

My first visit to Lee's former home, now Arlington National Cemetery, came when I was 12 years old, and it had a profound and lasting effect on me. Since then I have visited the cemetery hundreds of times searching for grave sites and conducting study tours for the Smithsonian Institution and various other groups interested in learning more about Lee and his family as well as many others buried at Arlington.

 

Lee's life story is in some ways the story of early America. He was born in 1807 to a loving mother, whom he adored. His relationship with his father, Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee, (who was George Washington's chief of staff during the Revolutionary War) was strained at best. Thus, as he matured in years, Lee adopted Washington (who had died in 1799) as a father figure and patterned his life after him. Two of Lee's ancestors signed the Declaration of Independence, and his wife, Mary Custis, was George Washington's foster great-granddaughter.

 

Lee was a top-of-the-class graduate of West Point, a Mexican War hero and superintendent of West Point. I can think of no family for which the Union meant as much as it did for his.

But it is important to remember that the 13 colonies that became 13 states reserved for themselves a tremendous amount of political autonomy. In pre-Civil War America, most citizens' first loyalty went to their state and the local community in which they lived. Referring to the United States of America in the singular is a purely post-Civil War phenomenon.

All this should help explain why Lee declined command of the Union forces -- by Abraham Lincoln -- after the firing on Fort Sumter. After much agonizing, he resigned his commission in the Union army and became a Confederate commander, fighting in defense of Virginia, which at the outbreak of the war possessed the largest population of free blacks (more than 60,000) of any Southern state.

 

Lee never owned a single slave, because he felt that slavery was morally reprehensible. He even opposed secession. (His slaveholding was confined to the period when he managed the estate of his late father-in-law, who had willed eventual freedom for all of his slaves.)

 

Regarding the institution, it's useful to remember that slavery was not abolished in the nation's capital until April 1862, when the country was in the second year of the war. The final draft of the Emancipation Proclamation was not written until September 1862, to take effect the following Jan. 1, and it was intended to apply only to those slave states that had left the Union.

 

Lincoln's preeminent ally, Frederick Douglass, was deeply disturbed by these limitations but determined that it was necessary to suppress his disappointment and "take what we can get now and go for the rest later." The "rest" came after the war.

 

Martin Luther King Jr. was one of the few civil rights leaders who clearly understood that the era of the 1960s was a distant echo of the 1860s, and thus he read deeply into Civil War literature. He came to admire and respect Lee, and to this day, no member of his family, former associate or fellow activist that I know of has protested the fact that in Virginia Dr. King's birthday -- a federal holiday -- is officially celebrated as "Robert E. Lee-Stonewall Jackson-Martin Luther King Day."

 

Lee is memorialized with a statue in the U.S. Capitol and in stained glass in the Washington Cathedral.

It is indeed ironic that he has long been embraced by the city he fought against and yet has now encountered some degree of rejection in the city he fought for.

In any event, his most fitting memorial is in Lexington, Va.: a living institution where he spent his final five years. There the much-esteemed general metamorphosed into a teacher, becoming the president of small, debt-ridden Washington College, which now stands as the well-endowed Washington and Lee University.

 

It was in Lexington that he made a most poignant remark a few months before his death. "Before and during the War Between the States I was a Virginian," he said. "After the war I became an American."

 

I have been teaching college students for 30 years, and learned early in my career that the twin maladies of ignorance and misinformation are not incurable diseases. The antidote for them is simply to make a lifelong commitment to reading widely and deeply. I recommend it for anyone who would make judgment on figures from the past, including Robert E. Lee.

 

[Dr. Smith is co-director of the Civil War Institute at American University in Washington, D.C.]


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#155
rjshae

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20768259_10102193011314864_7189431028325

 

But what if you're in clown training?

10052016-d7-1024x894.jpg



#156
Raithe

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The trouble with amateur sleuthing and desire to Dox...
Those who aim to identify Charlottesville marchers but sometimes misfire...

Edited by Raithe, 18 August 2017 - 01:50 AM.


#157
Malcador

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The trouble with amateur sleuthing and desire to Dox...
Those who aim to identify Charlottesville marchers but sometimes misfire...


Amateur internet analysis being bunk? I am surprised. Ah well, people of all stripes have to be justice porn fetishists so this is what happens

#158
Guard Dog

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OK, this is going to be a bit of a rant. But bear with me please. It was rolling around in my mind on the way home yesterday. As many of you know I have studied the American Civil War at length. I am pretty ambivalent about removing the confederate markers from public places. I really don't see the aesthetic value of statues in every park. Just a matter of taste I guess. Plus statues of people in places they have no connection to makes no sense to me. Lee & Davis in New Orleans? Why? I don't see moving or just removing them as erasing history in and of itself. Although that may be the intention. I'd draw the line when it comes to removing them from Gettysburg, Shiloh Battlefield, places like that as some are now calling for. Now you ARE erasing history.

 

As big a sin as erasing history is revising it to suit modern mores. And that has been going on with the CSA since around the beginning of the 20th Century when all these statues started being placed. I am of course, referring to the "Lost Cause" narrative. That the South was engaged in a virtuous struggle against a northern tyrant bent on taking their State's Rights. It begins with the statement "The war wasn't really about slavery". It's an appealing notion and one I was once partial to myself I'm sorry to admit. But even a little bit of reading and learning about what led up to South Carolina seceding and why it all happened will disabuse any rational person of the notion it was not about slavery. It was. Not because they were evil people who enjoyed oppressing other people. It was about money. Industrial scale agriculture before the industrial revolution. Slavery was a means to an economic end they would not consider parting with so yes, it was about slavery. 

 

As pernicious as the lost cause narrative is, a new one has emerged that is equally harmful. Again it involves the failure to understand the context of events by applying modern mores to people from the past.  In yesterday's Washington Post editorial they stated the memorials were "part of an ideological campaign whose goals were to glorify men and women who betrayed the United States".  The problem with that is the United States in 1861 was a very different thing than it is in 2017. There was no "national identity". People did not consider themselves citizens of the United States, they were citizens of THEIR state. When Virginia seceded Lee would have considered himself a traitor had he not taken command of the Virginia military forces. Had Virginia not seceded he may have actually taken Lincoln's offer of command of the Union army. In those days even the army itself was not a national institution but rather a collection of units raised and supplied by the states. The United States became the country we recognize today in the years following the war. Partially because of the war and partially because of the railroad. As people became more mobile and no longer lived and died in the same states their parents did the "national identity" began to form. Calling the people who fought for the CSA "traitors" is wrong. They were the people of their time dealing with circumstances beyond their control.

 

Historical events should not be revised to suit modern mores. It should be remembered as it happened in the context it happened. To be honest I don't see the point in memorializing the political leaders of the CSA. I don't think they deserve it. Memorializing to soldiers who were not fighting for slavery, rather defending their homes from an invading force is appropriate when placed in appropriate places. Cemeteries, battlefields, etc. That the cause the fought and died for was immoral, evil even is a tragedy. But it was not one of their making. There is a great line in Shakespeare's Henry V: "Now if those men do not die well it will be a black matter for the king that led them to it" That's why I don't think we should see statues of Jeff Davis, Alexander Stephens, or folks like that. 

 

Just my $.02


Edited by Guard Dog, 18 August 2017 - 04:59 AM.

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#159
Wrath of Dagon

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“The most effective way to destroy people is to deny and obliterate their own understanding of their history.”

“Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book has been re-written, every picture has been re-painted, every statue and street and building has been re-named, every date has been altered. And that process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.”

“Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.”

“If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.”

“If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face—for ever.”

George Orwell. https://www.goodread...e_Orwell?page=1

#160
Hurlshot

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Well said GD. I find it interesting that all the people defending Lee's statue seem to know nothing about the guy.






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